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GRAPHIC: CRUSADER: For some, Batman is much more than a comic book character.
LOAD-DATE: June 12, 2005




355 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 11, 2005 Saturday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 011
LENGTH: 356 words
HEADLINE: Combat death of GI stuns Scituate family
BYLINE: By FRANCI RICHARDSON
BODY:

Never in a million years did the Kelley family of Scituate expect military police to arrive at their door with the grim news of their youngest son's death.

Their 26-year-old had volunteered to relieve soldiers who had been overseas months longer than expected. And instead of Iraq, he was stationed in the less chaotic theater of Afghanistan. But at 11 p.m. Wednesday, two MPs in full dress pulled up in a Scituate cruiser to report to Joseph Kelley that his son, Michael Jason Kelley, was killed in a mortar attack on the front lines of Shkin, Afghanistan.

``When he was sent, we never thought that he would not come back - that didn't even come up,'' Kelley's brother, Shawn Kelley, 33, of Vermont said from his parents' home yesterday. ``This was a total shock to us. Very rarely are you seeing a lot of activity in Afghanistan.''

Kelley enrolled in the military in 1997, just after graduating from Scituate High School. He wanted to take advantage of the college tuition benefit, which helped him through a few semesters at Bridgewater State College. College ``wasn't for him at the time,'' Shawn Kelley said.

After the massive tragedy of Sept. 11, 2001, Kelley took a full-time position in Homeland Security at Otis Air Force Base. While he was there, his Quincy unit was sent to Iraq.

While Kelley was reassigned to Rehoboth, he took up a request to relieve overextended personnel. He left April 1 to start what was to be an 18-month tour.

``He just felt that it was almost like his duty to volunteer and to go,'' Shawn Kelley said.

Military police told the Kelley family their beloved radar operator was unloading a helicopter when four rockets that were fired by insurgents killed him instantly.

Kelley's mother, Karen, was the last to talk to her child Monday.

``He was fine. He was healthy,'' Shawn Kelley said. ``He asked for some baby wipes and Vicks VapoRub, and he wanted some expanding foam for his tent because he wanted to seal out the bugs.''

Last Christmas, Karen Kelley had pushed for a large celebration in case something happened to her son. ``Michael was saying it's not going to be our last Christmas,'' Shawn Kelley said.
GRAPHIC: KELLEY
LOAD-DATE: June 11, 2005




356 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 10, 2005 Friday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: THE EDGE; Pg. e09
LENGTH: 611 words
HEADLINE: Dance;

Images of war inform choreographers' works
BYLINE: By THEODORE BALE
BODY:

When 27-year-old Jill Jackson studied choreography at Roger Williams University, her professor said once, ``If the step has a name, throw it away.''

In a recent telephone interview from her home in New York, Jackson said the advice had a profound effect on the development of her choreographic language. Rather than choosing from any particular lexicon of established gestures and movement, she's come to mine the emotional landscapes of her dancers in order to generate material. Her latest quartet, for example, scrutinizes ``conversations that have impacted the dancers' lives, telling stories through shifts in body language, dynamics and gestures,'' according to a press release.

Along with her peers Andrea Blesso and Annie Kloppenberg (both 26), Jackson performs in a program aptly titled ``Between the Lines'' tonight and tomorrow night at Green Street Studios in Cambridge. While each choreographer has her own unique style, the common denominator among the three is using personal narratives from the dancers as a starting point. The results, according to Kloppenberg, are vastly different.

``Andrea finds her ideas physically, in her own body,'' said Kloppenberg. ``She is a real mover. Jill is really good at employing choreographic tools. In rehearsal she opens up her toolbox and picks up the appropriate tool for the moment, and then she fits the piece together that way. My work is spatially driven, and I like to work with images. I try not to be didactic in any way.''

Blesso, who met Jackson when both were students at Roger Williams University, will perform a solo based loosely on themes of immigration, service in war, illness and what she calls ``everyday survival rituals.'' One of her favorite souvenirs is her grandfather's wool peacoat, from the time he served in the Navy during WWII. One of his most vivid memories became a catalyst for her solo.

``My grandfather came from Sicily on a big boat,'' said Blesso. ``I think people back then were harder workers and much more focused, not as self-absorbed and materialistic as today. During WWII, he was in a battleship and a torpedo blasted into the hull. Luckily it was a dud. He actually touched this thing that was supposed to kill half the men on the ship. Then they pushed it back out into the sea and they repaired the hole.''

Blesso said she supposes she should explore the roots of the women in her family as well. ``But the men are very inspiring to me because of their physical actions,'' she added. She describes her style as ``athletic but fluid, bound and dramatic but very released at other times.''

In an odd coincidence, Kloppenberg's newest dance also explores the emotional impact of WWII, although she never discussed the details of the piece with Blesso.

``When I first came up with the concept, I was feeling so disconnected from the Iraq war,'' said Kloppenberg. ``It doesn't affect me directly. I don't know anyone who's fighting there right now, but I strongly oppose it. Each of my dancers came in with a personal story, and we made little dances about each of those and then layered them on top of each other.''

In rehearsal, her dance eventually took shape around the theme of women supporting each other during wartime. She also incorporated material from her days as a dance and American studies major at Middlebury College in Vermont.

``We use buckets and flowers in the dance,'' she said, ``which originates in the story of Molly Pitcher. During the American Revolutionary War, she carried water onto the battlefield for soldiers to drink. Eventually she picked up fallen weapons and joined in the battles herself.''

Tickets, $12-$15, can be reserved by calling 617-864-3191.
LOAD-DATE: June 10, 2005




357 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 10, 2005 Friday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 008
LENGTH: 296 words
HEADLINE: Actor-alum takes center stage
BYLINE: By MARIE SZANISZLO
BODY:

For Harvard, the choice was admittedly a first.

John Lithgow said as much - and more - yesterday when the actor complimented his alma mater for its ``uncharacteristic recklessness'' in choosing him instead of the usual world leader or Nobel laureate to address the university's 6,580 graduates.

``Wisdom? From an actor? Are you kidding?'' quipped Lithgow, who graduated in 1967 and went on to win four Emmys, two Tonys and one Golden Globe award. ``If I were a wise man, I never would have gone into acting.''

A ripple of laughter peeled through Harvard Yard before the two-time Academy Award nominee offered up the obligatory pearl of wisdom: ``Be creative. Be useful. Be practical. Be generous.''

Lithgow then demonstrated by reading a children's book that he is writing and dedicating to the class.

Touching lightly on the controversy stirred by Harvard President Lawrence Summers' comments earlier this year about women and science, Lithgow's story is about a female mouse who attends the university and studies science.

Summers took a more serious tone addressing the graduates, reminding them how 1.2 billion people struggle to live on the equivalent of less than $2 a day.

``While the United States today may be at the zenith of its power,'' he said, never before has the world's perception of this nation been ``as troubled, or as troubling.''

Summers, one of the university's most controversial presidents because of his alleged insensitivity toward women and African-Americans on the faculty, did not specifically mention the war in Iraq.

But he devoted much of his speech to extolling the merits of recruiting international students and expanding study-abroad programs, and to outlining the university's role on the global stage.

Jennifer Heldt Powell contributed to this report.
GRAPHIC: HAT-IN-HAND: Actor John Lithgow tips his mortarboard to the crowd of graduates after receiving his honorary degree before his commencement speech. STAFF PHOTO BY STUART CAHILL
LOAD-DATE: June 10, 2005




358 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 9, 2005 Thursday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 030
LENGTH: 124 words
HEADLINE: Meet the MBTA's finest: Class of 2005 graduates
BODY:

The MBTA Transit Police Academy graduated 46 new recruits yesterday in a ceremony at Faneuil Hall that included promotions for some MBTA veterans.

T spokesman Joseph Pesaturo said 12 of the graduates will become transit police in Boston and the rest will join departments in 10 surrounding towns, including Wellesley, Milton, Acton, West Bridgewater and Norfolk.

During the ceremony, 12 transit police patrolmen were promoted to sergeant and five sergeants were promoted to lieutenant.

Transit police officer Andrew J. Galonzka, a U.S. Marine who just returned from Iraq, was also recognized during the ceremony. A military reservist, Galonzka had served on the force for just one week when he was called to duty. He returned to service yesterday.
GRAPHIC: BABY BLUES: Kenneth Wood of the Quincy Police Department holds his 4-week-old son Jack during graduation at Faneuil Hall. Staff photo by David Goldman
LOAD-DATE: June 9, 2005




359 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 9, 2005 Thursday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 030
LENGTH: 124 words
HEADLINE: Meet the MBTA's finest: Class of 2005 graduates
BODY:

The MBTA Transit Police Academy graduated 46 new recruits yesterday in a ceremony at Faneuil Hall that included promotions for some MBTA veterans.

T spokesman Joseph Pesaturo said 12 of the graduates will become transit police in Boston and the rest will join departments in 10 surrounding towns, including Wellesley, Milton, Acton, West Bridgewater and Norfolk.

During the ceremony, 12 transit police patrolmen were promoted to sergeant and five sergeants were promoted to lieutenant.

Transit police officer Andrew J. Galonzka, a U.S. Marine who just returned from Iraq, was also recognized during the ceremony. A military reservist, Galonzka had served on the force for just one week when he was called to duty. He returned to service yesterday.
GRAPHIC: BABY BLUES: Kenneth Wood of the Quincy Police Department holds his 4-week-old son Jack during graduation at Faneuil Hall. Staff photo by David Goldman
LOAD-DATE: June 9, 2005




360 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 7, 2005 Tuesday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 028
LENGTH: 726 words
HEADLINE: Letters to the Editor
BODY:

Woes overstated

The story on the Interstate Compact inaccurately states that our office could not provide answers on the number of out-of-state sex offenders under probation supervision (May 26). That number would have been provided had it been clearly requested. Your reporter specifically asked for ``instances or specific cases where there are offenders from out of state who are in Massachusetts.'' That is a different subject.

I explained that I didn't have information based on her question and that I was unable to speak with the commissioner. I was surprised to then read: ``To make matters worse, Commissioner of Probation John O'Brien was unable to provide the number of out-of-state cons his agency is policing.''

The next day, the Herald included the figure I provided - without attribution.

Also, ``con'' is wrong. A con is in prison - not on probation.

- Coria A. Holland,

Director of Communications

Probation Commission

See the link?

Why is it so utterly challenging for school committees and administrators to connect the dots? Two more stories (``At rainbow's end, an STD downpour'' and ``Shrewsbury dad complains about sex survey for 11-year-old daughter,'' May 26) are about pushing sexuality prematurely on our kids.

The homosexual agenda is one of the conductors of this runaway train - all behavior must be stripped of age appropriateness, morality and gender to fit in with ``gay marriage models.'' Whether it's a youth risk survey, an AIDS booklet for 7-year-olds or lesbian-laden bedtime stories for kindergarteners, our culture is headed in only one directon: down.

- Pamela W. Clare, Bedford

Pro-Kerry and proud

It's apparent that columnist Howie Carr doesn't really know why Massachusetts voted for Kerry (``If I can read your Kerry sticker, you're too close,'' June 1).

A Kerry voter is concerned about health care, a well-funded education for every American, the environment, foreign affairs and people dying needlessly in Iraq. The list goes on.

And by the way, NPR is the best unbiased news source and Garrison Keillor most likely is a genius and the beautiful person named ``Chauncey'' with a trust fund is most likely a Republican.

- Andrew Blanchard, Arlington

Gelzinis ever good read

First among many reasons to read the Herald is Peter Gelzinis' column. The man has a moral center lacking in many of today's pundits. He also has a sense of history, rare, save in the writings of George Will and a few others.

His latest (``Blind devotion to Hoover was the bile in Deep Throat,'' June 3) is typical of his work. He chastises an FBI corrupt with power. Black hat agents H. Paul Rico and John Connolly are left naked in Gelzinis' acid words.

But the FBI is still problematic in Boston, one of the cities where a young J. Edgar Hoover started his climb to power during the infamous Palmer Raids during the Wilson administration.

The Herald recently reported on an FBI that targets young anarchist wannabes while Osama bin Laden remains free. A civil liberties group demands details on government domestic spying on dissidents Howard Zinn and Norm Chomsky and anti-war groups while Whitey Bulger remains at large.

So long as Gelzinis graces the pages of your newspaper, I shall remain an avid and loyal reader.

- Steve Lindsey, Keene, N.H.

Obesity can kill

We thank the Herald for its vigilance in reporting the ongoing risks of obesity (``Feds say fatheaded study minimized obesity's risks,'' June 3). Obesity puts children at risk of diabetes, asthma, heart problems and other diseases. We should take action to protect our children by replacing junk food with healthier alternatives, particularly in our schools. A bill filed by Rep. Peter Koutoujian would take this sensible step to reducing the obesity epidemic.

- Roberta R. Friedman,

Director of Education

Mass. Public Health Association

Justice denied in Mass.

Paul Martinek is right (``Majority rule is real justice,'' June 4). A requisite number of citizens signed petitions to get the protection of marriage question on the ballot, yet a majority of Democrats refused to obey the Massachusetts Constitution and because of this a majority of judges took the law into their own hands and refused to mandate the Legislature put the question on the ballot.

Too bad these public servants don't take an oath of office to swear to uphold the Constitution and all principles therein.

- Don Schwarz, Stoughton
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