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LOAD-DATE: June 20, 2005




344 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 20, 2005 Monday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 028
LENGTH: 130 words
HEADLINE: Editorial;

She still throws like a girl
BODY:

``It really doesn't have anything to do with being a female. It's about the duties I performed that day as a soldier.''

- Silver Star recipient Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester

----------

Reality overtook rhetoric - again - on combat restrictions for women as Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester last week became the first woman since World War II to receive the Silver Star, the third highest medal for valor.

``Her actions saved the lives of numerous convoy members. Sgt. Hester's bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism,'' the award citation reads, citing an attack on her unit during which she moved through enemy fire to help clear roadside trenches of insurgents, killing three.

A retail store manager in civilian life, Hester's still in Iraq, doing her duty. We salute her.
LOAD-DATE: June 20, 2005




345 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 19, 2005 Sunday

THIRD EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 014
LENGTH: 1083 words
HEADLINE: INSIDE TRACK;

Wild and crazy guys hit Nantucket fest
BYLINE: By Gayle Fee and Laura Raposa
BODY:

NANTUCKET - A boatload of bold-facers landed at the Sconset Casino last night to fete and fawn over funnyman Steve Martin at the annual NBC Universal Screenwriter's Tribute at the Nantucket Film Festival.

The Peacock People packed the place with newsies like Brian Williams,``Today'' weekend gal Campbell Brown, anchorgal Natalie Morales, CNBC's Maria Bartiromo and ``Hardball'' heavy Chris Matthews. ``SNL'' creator Lorne Michaels made the scene with Steve, and the lovely Lake Bell, who will appear in ``Fathom,'' a new under-the-sea ``Lost''-esque series on the network's schedule this fall, also vogued on the red carpet.

Macauley Culkin, fearful that he may encounter a question about his good friend Michael Jackson, cowardly skulked in a side door. Indie fave Steve Buscemi, here at the festival with his movie ``Lonesome Jim,'' also skipped the cameras-and-questions part of the program. But wannabe White House daughter Alexandra Kerry paraded before the press (although she couldn't remember her favorite Steve Martinism), as did comic Jim Gaffigan and ``Blind Justice'' top cop-now-on-hiatus Michael Gaston.

Inside the casino, Williams kicked off the yearly gush-a-thon with his usual round of jabs at Nantucket's weather, cobblestone streets, red tide alert and, of course, rich residents.

``I could tell my children were uncomfortable when they saw a family getting off a Gulf Stream II,'' the newsie deadpanned. ``It's only a 10-seater with those old swivel reading lights and aftermarket DVD player. But the kids were very good at not staring.''

Steve Martin left the sight gags to NBC's Bob Wright who came out to fawn over the funnyman with his trademark arrow-through-the-head. Which is probably the reason the only photog shooting the event inside was the network's official shutterbug!

``I got it from Lorne Michaels' extensive collection,'' he said.

Williams nearly brought the crowd down with a story about being imbedded with an Army battalion under fire in Iraq earlier this year but drove his point home when he said the lieutenant, who was around his age, told the unit to ``Let's get small.''

``Even in that you-know-what hole, we exchanged a knowing glance that we were part of something,'' said the groupie, who told the Track he wore out three stylists on his stereo playing ``Let's Get Small,'' Martin's debut comedy album in 1977.

Michaels, who had Martin host ``SNL'' more than a dozen times, introduced his wild 'n' crazy friend after a video tribute that included 11 films that Martin wrote and starred in, as well as many memorable ``SNL'' skits.

``This is especially meaningful for me,'' Mr. Happy Feet deadpanned. ``After school, my friends and I used to play Nantucket Film Festival screenwriters. I remember taking that first piece of paper and putting it in the typewriter and thinking maybe this will get me (bleeped).''

After receiving his traditional boat quarterboard with ``Martin'' engraved on it, the man of the hour joked that he would have preferred ``a full board.''

``Several of us were up late last night trying to find a boat named ``Martin','' reported the NBC News cheese.

Bet that left Steve feeling like a Jerk!

TRACKED DOWN

Man of the hour Steve Martin and ``SNL'' sultan Lorne Michaels lunching at The Ropewalk...``Las Vegas'' boss James Caan having a cocktail with Mass. Sports and Entertainment Commission cheese Mark Drago at the Brant Point Grille before meeting his tanorexic Hollywood bud GeorgeHamilton... Ben Stiller and Lake Bell, late of ``The Practice,'' chatting on the couch at J. Seward Johnson's swank manse at a late-night festival bash... NBC News nabob Brian Williams looking at the preppy duds in Murray's Toggery Shop...

Funnyman Steve Martin and ``Inside the Actor's Studio'' sultan James Liptontook turns playing each other's straight man yesterday when the Bravo! interviewer staged a sit-down with Hollywood's favorite Jerk here at the Nantucket Film Festival.

Martin, on the island to be feted by the festival last night at the annual NBC-sponsored Screenwriter's Tribute, flashed his famous humor as well as humility and haughtiness during the 90-minute Q&A in front of a SRO crowd at the Nantucket High School.

``On `Inside the Actors Studio,' I,'' Lipton began.

``Is that YOU?,'' the astonished actor asked. ``Oh. My. God.''

``It's me when it's not Will Ferrell,''the Studio softball tosser said, referring to the ``SNL'' alum's dead-on impersonation of him. ``And full disclosure - he's better than me.''

Talk about Bringing Down the House!

``You really don't seem prepared,'' Martin gibed James, holding up his trademark stacks of blue note cards.

During the course of the questioning, the actor and screenwriter described his early fascination with show biz and how working at Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif., got him hooked on performing magic tricks, making balloon animals and telling jokes.

``To me it was show business,'' he said.

Fast-forward to his college years studying philosophy at Long Beach State and then onto UCLA where he had the good fortune of having an ex-galpal sleeping with the head writer of the Smothers Brothers TV show. Years later, he got back into performing, he said, because he was ``envious.''

``For generations comedy was East Coast-based, mostly Jewish,'' Lipton droned. ``And then suddenly there came on the scene a West Coast WASP with an arrow through his head and happy feet, spearheading a revolution.''

``Well. I don't know if I spearheaded a revolution,'' Steve in the striped seersucker jacket shrugged.

``You did.''

``Oh.''

File Under: All of Steve

WE HEAR:

That NBC News chief Brian Williams is never, ever away from the nightly broadcast because he has a special number on speed-dial on his cell phone that allows him to listen in to the show. ``It drives my wife nuts,'' he said.

That CN8 WILL include Needham homey Scott Rosenberg's woeful tale of losing his galpal, actress - and now Comcast spokesgal - Bridget Moynahan to New England Patriots QB/QT Tom Brady on ``Backstage with Barry Nolan'' on Friday night at 8. The screenwriter said he had no idea that the festival's Late Night Storytelling event was sponsored by Comcast. We blame it on the six Grey Gooses he imbibed pre-tale telling.

That ``Fat Actress'' PA Bryan Callum dated ``Monster'' director Patty Jenkins for nine years. They're such good pals, Patty said she'd put him in her next flick. That's Bryan's take on the situation anyway.

That wonderfully wacky Amy Sedaris is writing a book about entertaining and cooking for Warner Books.
GRAPHIC: EXCUUUSE MEEE! Film star and screenwriter Steve Martin, right, and `Saturday Night Live' creator Lorne Michaels head into the Sconset Casino on Nantucket last night. Staff photo by Mark Garfinkel

`PRACTICE' MAKES PERFECT: Lake Bell, lat of NBC's `The Practice,' was on hand for the Nantucket festivities yesterday. Staff photo by Mark Garfinkel ΓΏ1A
LOAD-DATE: June 19, 2005




346 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 18, 2005 Saturday

THIRD EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 011
LENGTH: 378 words
HEADLINE: Marblehead soldier succumbs to wounds
BYLINE: By CASEY ROSS and DAWN WITLIN
BODY:

A Marblehead Special Forces soldier who fought in the world's toughest battle zones died Thursday from wounds suffered during an attack earlier this month on his convoy in Afghanistan.

Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Piper, 43, died on his home soil Thursday after battling for two weeks against seared lungs and burns more than 60 percent of his body. He suffered the injuries when the Humvee he was riding in was struck by a homemade bomb June 3.

``He was what everyone wishes a soldier to be,'' his sister, Lisa Piper, said. ``Christopher joined the Marines the day he turned 18. He really believed in his own sense of righteousness, he was just born that way.''

Piper, who leaves a wife and two children from a previous marriage, served in Beirut and Iraq and was on his second tour in Afghanistan when he suffered the fatal injuires.

``He made everyone feel safe, had an incredible sense of humor and was incredibly smart,'' his sister said.

Despite endless career options - Piper was a high school honors student and football captain - the Marblehead native joined the Marines after graduating high school in 1980. He joined the Army in the 1990s and was most recently serving with a Special Forces unit based in Fort Bragg, N.C.

The attack that led to his death killed two other American soldiers and wounded an Afghani interpreter who was traveling in the Humvee. Piper, though badly burned, was pulled to safety by Afghani government soldiers he had been training, his sister said.

Doctors and family members reported steady improvement in recent days as Piper began undergoing a series of skin grafts to replace damaged tissue. But his condition took a turn for the worse after doctors discovered a previously unknown abdominal injury and performed emergency surgery.

The procedure was not enough.

Piper succumbed Thursday at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, Texas. In addition to his sister, he is survived by his wife, Connie Morales; his two children from a previous marriage, Diedre Piper, 13, and Christopher Piper, 12; his father and a brother.

``He touched everyone in both a gentle and strong manner. He believed and cared about the old-fashioned things: truth, justice, the American way of life, defending America and parenting,'' his sister, Lisa, recalled.
GRAPHIC: PIPER: Wounded by blast while serving in Afghanistan.
LOAD-DATE: June 18, 2005




347 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 18, 2005 Saturday

FIRST EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 011
LENGTH: 355 words
HEADLINE: Soldier `determined to serve' dies of wounds
BYLINE: By CASEY ROSS
BODY:

A Marblehead special forces soldier who fought in the world's toughest battle zones has died from wounds suffered during a recent attack on his convoy in Afghanistan.

Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Piper, 43, died on his home soil Thursday after battling for two weeks against seared lungs and burns over 60 percent of his body. He suffered the injuries when the Humvee he was riding in was struck by a homemade bomb June 3.

``This was his calling,'' his sister, Lisa Piper, told WBZ-TV (Ch. 4) yesterday. ``He was bound and determined (to serve) no matter what, no matter where.''

Piper, who leaves a wife and two daughters, served in Beruit, Iraq and was on his second tour in Afghanistan when he suffered the fatal injuires.

Despite endless career options - Piper was an honors student in high school and captain of the football team - the Marblehead native joined the Marines after graduating high school in 1980.

He served for six years before returning to civilian life, but Piper wanted to go back, to defend his country however and wherever he could, his family said.

``No matter where they needed America to come in, my brother was there,'' Lisa Piper told WBZ.

He then joined the Army and was most recently serving with a special forces unit based in Fort Bragg, N.C.

The attack that led to his death killed two other American soldiers and wounded an Afghani interpreter who was traveling in the Humvee. Piper, though badly burned, was pulled to safety by Afghani government soldiers he had been training, his sister said.

Doctors and family members reported steady improvement in recent days as Piper began undergoing a series of skin grafts to replace damaged tissue. But his condition took a turn after doctors discovered a previously unknown abdominal injury and performed emergency surgery.

The procedure was not enough. Piper succumbed Thursday at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio. In addition to his sister, he is survived by his wife, Connie Morales; two children from a previous marriage, Diedre Piper, 13, and Christopher Piper, 12; his father and a brother.

Material from The Associated Press was used in this report.
LOAD-DATE: June 18, 2005




348 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
June 16, 2005 Thursday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 033
LENGTH: 371 words
HEADLINE: OP-ED;

Lynch gets up close and personal on Iraq
BYLINE: By WAYNE WOODLIEF
BODY:

Rep. Stephen F. Lynch (D-South Boston) is a hands-on kind of congressman. From his days as an ironworker, Lynch likes to see it, feel it, experience an issue up close to see how it affects our country and the people he represents.

Lynch supported the Bush administration's invasion of Iraq from the start.

That's why the congressman's warning this week - after a fact-finding mission to Iraq where he ate, spoke and flew with the troops - that it's time for America to get serious about getting out sooner rather than later is an ominous omen for the president's vague ``stay the course'' path.

Lynch vividly described to business leaders of the New England Council riding with the crew of a Black Hawk helicopter from Baghdad to Tikrit, Saddam Hussein's home town.

``We flew about 120 feet off the ground,'' he said. ``And when we would pass over a caravan of goat herders or over a town, young children would rush out excited and smiling and waving up at the helicopter. And the gunners would throw out big bags of candy and soccer balls to the kids.''

Though he praised the Iraqi elections as a turning point in their own ``move against oppression,'' Lynch said, ``Only time will tell if the Iraqis will sufficiently appreciate and love that freedom. And at some point, we're going to run out of time.''

Set no hard withdrawal timetable, he cautioned. That could embolden the terrorists and endanger our troops. But a clear exit strategy is in order. Otherwise, ``Our presence militarily can be transformed into that of a colonial patron'' similar, Lynch said, to the British in India, the French in Vietnam and the Soviet Union in Afghanistan who ``stayed too long.''

What most angers Lynch is the lack of funding and support he sees for grievously-wounded American troops he often visits at Walter Reed Army Medical Center's Amputee Center.

``It is full of our young men who (in losing limbs) have sacrificed the simple pleasure of walking their daughter down the aisle or playing a game of catch with their kids.'' These are the costs of war that can never become acceptable. ``Never!'' he said.

``We can stay too long in Iraq,'' he added - and he ought to know. But is President Bush listening?

Wayne Woodlief's column appears weekly.
LOAD-DATE: June 16, 2005




349 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
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