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LOAD-DATE: September 6, 2005




205 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
September 6, 2005 Tuesday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: FINANCE; Pg. 029
LENGTH: 288 words
HEADLINE: Katrina Boon to Builders
BYLINE: By SCOTT VAN VOORHIS
BODY:

Politically-connected builder Halliburton Co. and other big contractors saw their stock prices shoot up in the wake of Hurricane Katrina as investors bet they will clean up with massive reconstruction projects.

While the stock price surge had tapered off by Friday, Bush adminstration favorite Halliburton saw its stock price end the week just below its 52-week high of $63.44.

But Vice President Dick Cheney's corporate alma mater was hardly the only builder to benefit from a surge of investor interest after the storm.

Bay State builder Perini Corp. also saw an initial stock price surge, with its share price soaring 12 percent on Wednesday, before settling back at week's end to $18.85.

Bob Band, the company's president, has already contacted the Federal Emergency Management Ageny to offer his firm's services.

In particular, Perini has extensive experience building temporary housing during Iraq and Afghanistan over the last few years that could be put to work in New Orleans, he said.

``We would welcome any kind of assignment,'' Band said. ``It would be an honor to assist in the recovery.''

But Halliburton may already be in position to grab a share of the New Orleans work. The behemoth contractor is the U.S. Navy's go-to contractor for big disasters - a deal that already has Halliburton helping assess and repair damage to Navy bases in the Gulf Coast, according to a company spokeswoman.

Homebuilder Lennar Corp.'s shares rose more than $2 last Wednesday, when the full extent of Katrina's devastation began to settle in.

The stock finished the week at $61 - up $2.61 from where it stood just before the storm hit.

Toll Brothers, another major homebuilder, was up $2.50 from where it stood before the storm to $47.60 Friday.
LOAD-DATE: September 6, 2005




206 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
September 5, 2005 Monday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 004
LENGTH: 715 words
HEADLINE: KATRINA'S WRATH;

BAY STATE PREPARES TO WELCOME SURVIVORS;

Cape's Camp Edwards to house 2,500 refugees
BYLINE: By THOMAS CAYWOOD
BODY:

The feverish transformation of a Cape Cod army base into a makeshift refugee city - complete with its own school and police - will shift into high gear today with the first flights of displaced and destitute Hurricane Katrina survivors expected as early as tomorrow.

``This is going to take a major effort by state agencies and volunteers,'' Gov. Mitt Romney said. A section of Camp Edwards that includes unused military barracks, townhouses, mess halls, chapels, gymnasiums and other facilities is being readied to welcome roughly 2,500 Louisiana refugees who lost everything in the storm and subsequent flooding of New Orleans.

Meanwhile, a major contingent of 535 Massachusetts National Guardsmen activated to help restore order in New Orleans will begin flying out of Otis Air National Guard Base today.

The incoming refugees, who most likely will be airlifted from Texas where they've been sleeping on cots in the Astrodome, can be housed reasonably comfortably on the base for a month or two, Romney said. But, with nothing left for many of them to return to, the governor called on cities and towns to help the displaced establish new lives here. ``We're going to need to find, in many cases, permanent housing for these individuals. Jobs, housing, transportation and the like,'' Romney said.

Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino said the Hub waits with open arms. ``My administration is ready to help you restore your lives and make sure you get back to your normal family structure,'' Menino pledged.

The mayor had floated a plan to fly the refugees into Logan International Airport and house them in the Boston Convention Center, but state officials instead tapped Camp Edwards. Romney said the convention center arrangement ``just wouldn't be tenable on more than an emergency basis.''

Plans call for the refugees to be processed at an airplane hangar on arrival to determine immediate medical needs. The sick will be taken to Boston hospitals for treatment, while the others are settled into military quarters.

``We're going to need teachers. If we have children coming, we're going to be setting up a school down there at Camp Edwards,'' Romney said. ``They're going to come here with the clothing on their backs.'' Because it isn't clear yet what kind of people are coming - young or old, sick or well - he asked people to hold off on donating anything other than money.

``Cost is not one of our considerations. Compassion is coming first,'' said Romney, who added that the federal government was expected to pick up much of the tab.

The security force of Massachusetts National Guardsmen headed to New Orleans will be composed of military police, infantry and artillery units that have been trained to handle security missions in Iraq. ``Right now all we know is that they're going down to provide assistance with the security mission. That's as much as we know,'' said Brig. Gen. Oliver Mason, the state's top general.

GRAPHIC: Caring for the victims

Some 2,500 refugees from Louisiana will be airlifted beginning tomorrow from emergency shelters in Texas to Camp Edwards on Cape Cod, where they will be housed for up to two months while they try to put their lives back together. Here's how the state proposes to help them:

1. First few hours: Arrival and processing in an airplane hangar at Otis Air National Guard Base, overseen by Massport and state Executive Office of Public Safety.

- Evaluated for immediate medical needs

- Case file created

- Issued ID card or bracelet

- Paid a small sum of cash to buy sundries

2. First few days: Assessment by social workers, educators and counselors, overseen by state Executive Office of Health and Human Services

- Kids put in school

- Counseling begins

- Job placement assistance begins

- Federal disaster benefits applied for

- Attempts made to find missing loved ones

3. One to two months: The refugees will eat, sleep, worship, shop, go to school and begin the process of getting on with their lives at their temporary home on Camp Edwards, overseen by the Massachusetts National Guard with help from Red Cross and Salvation Army

- Social workers and employment specialists will help refugees find homes in Massachusetts by matching them with cities and towns and private residents willing to help them build new lives here.

Source: Governor's press briefing
GRAPHIC: MASS. APPEAL: Gov. Mitt Romney speaks about hurricane relief at a press conference yesterday as Secretary of Public Safety Edward Flynn looks on. Below, a section of Camp Edwards that includes unused military barracks, townhouses, mess halls, chapels, gymnasiums and other facilities is being readied to welcome roughly 2,500 Louisiana refugees who lost everything in the storm and subsequent flooding of New Orleans. STAFF PHOTOS BY MARK GARFINKEL, ABOVE, AND ANGELA ROWLINGS
LOAD-DATE: September 5, 2005




207 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
September 5, 2005 Monday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: THE EDGE; Pg. 024
LENGTH: 578 words
HEADLINE: MUSIC: Born to talk;

DVD shows Bruce Springsteen's a master `Storyteller'
BYLINE: By LARRY KATZ
BODY:

Almost every Bossaholic watched Bruce Springsteen's ``VH1 Storytellers'' special back when it first aired in April. So why get excited about tomorrow's DVD release of the show?

Simple. It's much better now, re-edited and expanded to more than double its original 44-minute length.

Springsteen, performing alone except for ``Brilliant Disguise'' with wife Patti Scialfa adding harmony, only plays eight songs, but they include ones cut from the original broadcast (``Nebraska,'' ``Waitin' on a Sunny Day''). And the stories he tells about his songs - which is the point of ``Storytellers,'' after all - are much longer and thus more gratifying.

Take, for example, his detailed explanation of ``Thunder Road.'' You can't help being charmed when he gets to, ``Got this guitar and I learned how to make it talk,'' and laughs as he calls it ``probably the hokiest line that I've ever written.''

``VH1 Storytellers'' was recorded on April 4 on Springsteen's home turf, the Two River Theater in Red Bank, N.J. He starts off sounding strangely nervous.

``It's an iffy proposition,'' he says of the show's song-talk format. ``Talking about music is like talking about sex. Can you describe it? Are you supposed to?''

His first song is ``Devils & Dust,'' the title track of his most recent album, and the name of his current solo tour, which comes to Worcester's DCU Center Oct. 20, to the Dunkin' Donuts Center in Providence Oct. 21 and to the TD Banknorth Garden in Boston Oct. 28. When he finishes playing it, Springsteen offers a line-by-line examination of the song and how it relates to the situation faced by young American soldiers fighting in Iraq. Shuffling through notes he says he pored over the night before in his kitchen, he seems uncomfortable and in a rush to get through an unfamiliar situation.

Don't believe it. Though it may look like Springsteen has never done this chat-heavy type of performance before, he has. In fact, it's very much like the solo benefit performance he gave in February 2003 at the Somerville Theatre for the now-defunct Double Take magazine. As in his arena concerts with the E Street Band, Springsteen is a master at feigning spontaneity. This is not to say that he followed a prepared script for ``VH1 Storytellers,'' only that he is a skilled showman who knows exactly what he is doing and where he is going.

Soon enough, Springsteen visibly relaxes in front of the ``Storytellers'' audience and turns more humorous.

``So what was that about?'' he askes rhetorically during his exegesis of ``Blinded By the Light.'' ``I always say that's the song that explains why I never did any drugs. I don't think I could've stood it. My mind was already reeling.''

Speaking in his introduction to ``Brilliant Disguise'' of the different faces we all wear at different times, Springsteen makes an almost shocking confession, the saintly singer/songwriter admitting to a fondness for visiting scruffy strip joints.

The DVD's sole extra is a 15-minute question-and-answer session with the audience (which was also a part of his Somerville Theatre show). One questioner says, ``I feel like I know you. Do I?'' Springsteen quickly shoots back, ``No,'' and laughs. ``It's part of the job, that whole `feelin' like I know you' thing.''

Yes, the star remains ultimately unknowable. But after watching this DVD - and savoring priceless moments such as his impression of Smokey Robinson singing ``Waitin' On A Sunny Day'' - fans will feel closer to Bruce than ever.
LOAD-DATE: September 5, 2005




208 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
September 4, 2005 Sunday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: FINANCE; Pg. 012
LENGTH: 382 words
HEADLINE: Relatives on edge for reserves' return
BYLINE: By Thomas Caywood
BODY:

After enduring the deadliest month of the war for Guard and Reserve troops, the families of local citizen-soldiers say they're coping and counting the days until their loved ones come home.

``Every single day, you wake up and thank the Lord that nothing happened to your loved one. Every day is scary. You can't go to bed and not have it on your mind,'' said Tony Procida of Portland, Maine.

His daughter, 1st Lt. Kristen Procida of South Boston, is serving as a platoon leader in Tikrit, Iraq, with the Massachusetts National Guard's 42nd Military Police Company.

National Guard and Reserve units from around the country now make up roughly half of U.S. combat forces in Iraq. At least 42 part-time soldiers were killed in action in August, far exceeding the previous highest total of 27 in May.

``We have not had any casualties this month, and we're grateful for that,'' said Lt. Col. Greg Smith, a spokesman for the Massachusetts National Guard. ``But all guardsmen are concerned for the health and welfare of our comrades in Iraq, especially guardsmen from other states. Whenever we hear of casualties, it affects us.''

Roughly 1,100 Bay State guardsmen are in Iraq or Afghanistan or are in the process of deploying. Insurgent mortar fire killed Massachusetts National Guard Sgt. Michael Kelley, 26, of Scituate in June. He was stationed in Afghanistan and killed near the Pakistani border.

Last week, Vermont National Guard Master Sgt. Chris Chapin, 39, of Proctor, Vt., was killed in a firefight during a combat patrol in Ar Ramadi, Iraq.

``I don't dwell on the facts, but I'm aware of things,'' said Andrea Heckman-Young of Orange, whose guardsman husband, Master Sgt. Joe Young, is on his second deployment to Iraq.

Heckman-Young said she keeps the fear at bay mainly through brute willpower.

``I know friends that are on the edge every day worrying about their spouse or child. I said, `You can't do it. Trust me. I've already gone through this once,''' Heckman-Young said.

Procida said he questions why U.S. troops are still in Iraq. It's a question that occurred to many others last week amid the botched hurricane rescue operations. Almost one-third of the men and women of the Louisiana National Guard, and an even higher percentage of the Mississippi National Guard, are deployed in Iraq.
LOAD-DATE: September 4, 2005




209 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
September 4, 2005 Sunday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 012
LENGTH: 368 words
HEADLINE: Bay State kin anxious for citizen-soldiers' return
BYLINE: By Thomas Caywood
BODY:

After enduring the deadliest month of the war for Guard and Reserve troops, the families of local citizen-soldiers say they're coping and counting the days until their loved ones come home.

``Every single day, you wake up and thank the Lord that nothing happened to your loved one. Every day is scary,'' said Tony Procida of Portland, Maine.

His daughter, 1st Lt. Kristen Procida of South Boston, is serving as a platoon leader in Tikrit, Iraq, with the Massachusetts National Guard's 42nd Military Police Company.

National Guard and Reserve units from around the country make up roughly half of U.S. combat forces in Iraq. At least 42 part-time soldiers were killed in action in August, far exceeding the previous highest total of 27 in May.

``We have not had any casualties this month, and we're grateful for that,'' said Lt. Col. Greg Smith, a spokesman for the Massachusetts National Guard. ``But all guardsmen are concerned for the health and welfare of our comrades in Iraq, especially guardsmen from other states. Whenever we hear of casualties, it affects us.''

Roughly 1,100 Bay State guardsmen are in Iraq or Afghanistan or are deploying. Insurgent mortar fire killed Massachusetts National Guard Sgt. Michael Kelley, 26, of Scituate in June. He was stationed in Afghanistan and killed near the Pakistani border.

Last week, Vermont National Guard Master Sgt. Chris Chapin, 39, of Proctor, Vt., was killed in a firefight during a combat patrol in Ar Ramadi, Iraq.

``I don't dwell on the facts, but I'm aware of things,'' said Andrea Heckman-Young of Orange, whose guardsman husband, Master Sgt. Joe Young, is on his second deployment to Iraq.

Heckman-Young said she keeps the fear at bay mainly through brute willpower. ``I know friends that are on the edge every day worrying about their spouse or child. I said, `You can't do it. Trust me. I've already gone through this once,' '' she said.

Procida said he questions why U.S. troops are still in Iraq. It's a question that occurred to many others last week amid the botched hurricane rescue operations. Almost one-third of the men and women of the Louisiana National Guard, and an even higher percentage of the Mississippi National Guard, are deployed in
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