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LOAD-DATE: August 17, 2005




257 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 16, 2005 Tuesday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 004
LENGTH: 393 words
HEADLINE: Neighbors say, `We've had enough'
BYLINE: By BRIAN BALLOU
BODY:

Marine of the Year Daniel Cotnoir remains a hero in the eyes of some Lawrence residents, despite being charged with attempted murder for shooting into a crowd early Saturday.

``Somebody had to step up to the plate,'' said Bruce Reynolds, owner of the Longhorn Gas Station on Broadway Avenue, who, like other residents is exasperated by late-night carousing and violence in Lawrence.

Cotnoir, whose lives next to the station, is accused of firing out of his second-floor window about 2:30 a.m. into a large crowd of raucous youths in front of Reynolds' station. The bullet hit a concrete island and shattered, sending shrapnel into the neck and leg of a 15-year-old girl and the leg of a 20-year-old man. Witnesses say someone in the crowd had thrown something at Cotnoir's house, and then threw a bottle through his window.

``In no way do I condone what he did, but I can understand his frustration with the city because we have been trying to get them to do something about those crowds for a long time,'' Reynolds said. ``I hold the city somewhat responsible for what took place. This all didn't just happen at a snap of the finger.''

Several residents living in the area said the city has been unresponsive in addressing the large after-hours crowds that spill out of area nightclubs on weekends.

``I don't want to point any fingers, but if the city and the mayor would have done something about all the complaints before, this probably would have never happened,'' said a 34-year-old woman who refused to give her name. ``Sure, it's stupid to shoot at people, but you have to understand what this man has been through.''

Cotnoir, a reservist, served in a mortuary unit in Iraq that was responsible for gathering dead Marines and preparing their bodies for the trip home. His family runs the Edgar J. Racicot Funeral Home, next to the gas station. Last month, Cotnoir was named the Marine Corps Times' 2005 Marine of the Year.

Lawrence Mayor Michael Sullivan said he is aware of the problem residents face with the pre-dawn crowds and plans to meet with Police Chief John Romero in the next few days to respond to the issue.

In talking about this latest incident, Sullivan referred to the shooting in March that left high school basketball star Hector Paniagua, 18, paralyzed.

``These two events took place near two after-hour clubs and involved teens,'' Sullivan said.
GRAPHIC: SICK OF IT: Bruce Reynolds, owner of Longhorn Gas Station on Broadway in Lawrence, says the city has been unresponsive to the problem of late-night crowds. STAFF PHOTO BY ANGELA ROWLINGS
LOAD-DATE: August 16, 2005




258 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 16, 2005 Tuesday

FIRST EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 004
LENGTH: 267 words
HEADLINE: Vet eyed for post traumatic stress
BYLINE: By BRIAN BALLOU
BODY:

A Lawrence District Court judge ordered decorated Marine Sgt. Daniel Cotnoir to undergo at Bridgewater State Hospital to determine if he is competent to stand trial for allegedly shooting into a crowd Saturday.

While Cotnoir's lawyer, Robert Kelley, said it is too early to tell if his client suffers from post traumatic stress disorder, court records say Cotnoir claimed PTSD may have played a role.

U.S. Rep. Martin Meehan said concerns about war-related post-traumatic stress underscore the need to strengthen the military's screening of returning soldiers. Meehan has several proposals before the Armed Services Committee to boost screening and treament.

Kelley said his client is ``very remorseful, emotionally upset, contrite about how this has affected his family. I don't think that lives or the safety of the general public are threatened by this man.''

But a state motion in Cotnoir's court file states, ``D discharged a shotgun into a crowd of people. Bullet fragments struck two people. D had been drinking. D is a highly trained Marine. D is claiming/has claimed that PTSD may have been a factor.''

On one occasion, authorities familiar with Cotnoir's service in Iraq say, he had to run into a burning vehicle that had been hit with a roadside bomb and retrieve bodies under enemy fire.

Meehan, who gave Cotnoir his Marine of the Year award earlier this year in Washington, is pushing legislation to improve diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and decrease the stigma attached to it. ``PTSD is something we've been working on a lot and it is one of Marty's personal crusades,'' said spokesman Matt Vogel.
LOAD-DATE: August 16, 2005




259 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 16, 2005 Tuesday

THIRD EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 004
LENGTH: 282 words
HEADLINE: Vet eyed for post traumatic stress
BYLINE: By BRIAN BALLOU
BODY:

A Lawrence District Court judge ordered decorated Marine Sgt. Daniel Cotnoir to undergo an evaluation at Bridgewater State Hospital to determine if he is competent to stand trial for allegedly shooting into a crowd Saturday.

While Cotnoir's lawyer, Robert Kelley, said it is too early to tell if his client suffers from post traumatic stress disorder, court records say Cotnoir claimed PTSD may have played a role.

U.S. Rep. Martin Meehan said concerns about war-related post-traumatic stress underscore the need to strengthen the military's screening of returning soldiers. Meehan has several proposals before the Armed Services Committee to boost screening and treament.

Meanwhile, Massachusetts National Guard Lt. Col. Paul G. Smith said guardsmen now receive the same post-deployment screening all military personnel receive. But because PTSD often doesn't manifest itself until well after a soldier's return, he said Guard officials are discussing the possibility of follow-up screening, but no formal proposal is under consideration.

Kelley said Cotnoir is ``very remorseful, emotionally upset, contrite about how this has affected his family. I don't think that lives or the safety of the general public are threatened by this man.''

But a state motion to hold Cotnoir without bail due to dangerousness states, ``D discharged a shotgun into a crowd of people. Bullet fragments struck two people. D had been drinking. D is a highly trained Marine. D is claiming/has claimed that PTSD may have been a factor.''

On one occasion, authorities familiar with Cotnoir's service in Iraq say, he had to run into a burning vehicle that had been hit with a roadside bomb and retrieve bodies under enemy fire.
LOAD-DATE: August 16, 2005




260 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 16, 2005 Tuesday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 026
LENGTH: 140 words
HEADLINE: Editorial;

The non-war stories in Iraq
BODY:

There was apparently a fair amount of grumbling at last month's meeting of member newspapers of the Associated Press (and that's most of the nation's newspapers including this one) about the wire service's Iraq coverage.

The A.P. does a fine job of covering the breaking news - the roadside bombings, the death tolls, the daily mayhem.

But, according to an account in The New York Times, editors are grousing that there is little or no coverage of success stories in Iraq - of schools built or rebuilt, of infrastructure repairs, of the kind of normalcy that columnist Ralph Peters wrote of on these pages Thursday.

A.P. officials pointed to the obvious dangers of reporting from Iraq. But the kind of coverage being demanded requires not necessarily more risk but a shift in priorities, and the kind of balanced reporting A.P. was known for.
LOAD-DATE: August 16, 2005




261 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 16, 2005 Tuesday

ALL EDITIONS
SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. 027
LENGTH: 547 words
HEADLINE: OP-ED;

Bold Bush needed beyond the Beltway
BYLINE: By Virginia Buckingham
BODY:

Go to Ohio, Mr. President. And on your way to the airport in Waco, stop and talk to Cindy Sheehan. Sure, it'll be a media circus, but a little unscripted media attention is exactly what you need right now.

The Bush administration is enamored with the fireside chat model of communication with the public. Prime-time addresses from the White House have been the venue of choice for the president to update the American people about the Iraq war and other major policies.

And when the president has ventured outside the Beltway to address the issue of Iraq, it's usually been in a well-crafted speech delivered before a friendly pro-military audience. The strategy was simple and effective to go over the heads of the naysaying mainstream media (MSM) and talk directly to the people.

But it's a strategy that has outlived its usefulness.

It's time to feed the MSM beast.

The president's 42 percent job approval rating is evidence enough that his message isn't getting through. The Associated Press compared that rating to former Presidents Reagan and Clinton at the same point in their second terms and the numbers were sobering. Reagan's approval rating was 57 and Clinton's a sky-high 61.

But there weren't mothers of dead soldiers on either of these presidents' doorsteps, either. And there wasn't a single town in Ohio featured on the evening news and front pages which lost 20 of its Marines in two days.

President Bush doesn't care much about his personal popularity. He prides himself on doing what he thinks is right, regardless of the political consequences.

But he should care that the same AP/Ipsos poll showed only 38 percent of Americans approve of his management of the Iraq war. A recent Pew Research poll found 64 percent of Americans think Bush has failed to articulate a ``clear plan'' for Iraq and the latest CNN/USAToday/Gallup poll found that 57 percent of Americans think the war has made us less safe.

Sen. John Kerry made this point repeatedly during the presidential campaign: It's not leadership if no one is following. (Hey, even a broken clock can be right twice a day.)

In Saturday's weekly radio address, Bush had the right message but for all who heard him not just listened but really heard him he may as well have been talking to himself in the mirror while shaving.

``The terrorists will fail,'' Bush said. ``Because we are fighting a murderous ideology with a clear strategy, we're staying on the offensive in Iraq, Afghanistan and other fronts in the war on terror, fighting terrorists abroad so we do not have to face them here at home. When terrorists spend their days and nights struggling to avoid death or capture, they're less capable of arming and training and plotting new attacks on America.

``The terrorists cannot defeat us on the battlefield. The only way they can win is if we lose our nerve.''

Take those same words, though, and say them to Cindy Sheehan and I guarantee they will break through.

Go to Brook Park, Ohio, and meet with the families and the regular townspeople who just buried 20 Marines and look them in the eye and tell them it's worth it.

``Tell them we can't lose our nerve'' and it will be the top story of every newscast.

- Talk back to Virginia Buckingham at vbuckingham@bostonherald.com. Her column appears Tuesday and Thursday. ΓΏ1A
LOAD-DATE: August 16, 2005




262 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 15, 2005 Monday

THIRD EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 005
LENGTH: 414 words
HEADLINE: `Marine of Year' charged in shooting
BYLINE: By O'Ryan Johnson and Marie Szaniszlo
BODY:

Marine reservist Daniel Cotnoir, accused of firing into a raucous crowd and injuring two youths early Saturday, was a changed man when he came back from Iraq last year, a friend told the Herald.

``The Iraq war has come to Lawrence,'' said the friend, who asked not to be identified. ``He's been very, very stressed out since he came back. This is a result of him serving overseas . . . It really isn't that surprising. He needs some help.''

Cotnoir, 33, a married Lawrence mortician with two children, and 2005 Marine Corps Times ``Marine of the Year,'' is charged with two counts of attempted murder after he allegedly fired his shotgun from his apartment window. Witnesses said someone in the unruly crowd leaving a nearby nightclub had thrown a bottle through his window, and may have thrown something before that.

Cotnoir has complained about the nightclub before and had already called police when he allegedly opened fire. A bullet fragments hit Lissette Cumba, 15, of Lowell in the neck, narrowly missing an artery. Kelvin Castro, 20, also of Lowell, was hit in the leg.

A friend of Cumba who has seen Cotnoir at a local gun range and Cotnoir's friend say he is a good shot who likely didn't mean to hit anyone. Cotnoir's friend said, ``This kid has two young children in that house. I think he was probably firing a warning shot. He's a trained marksman. If he wanted to shoot someone, he could have shot them.''

But as Cumba recovered at home yesterday, her cousin said, ``He should be tried like everyone else. If he was going to get any special treatment, it should have been before now, after he came home from Iraq. That's a problem the government has to face. They are sending people away and they come back disturbed.''

The Marine Corps put Cotnoir on mortuary duty after learning he is a mortician, the Marine Corps Times reported. The paper named him 2005 Marine of the Year for his work gathering the remains of slain Marines.

``Because I do it in the civilian world, everyone says it's easy,'' Cotnoir told the Times. ``It's not. It's hard ... No one gets to die peacefully in their sleep over there.''

Cotnoir sought counseling after he returned. Experts are predicting high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder among Iraq vets, the vast majority of whom report experiencing contributing factors such as being shot at, killing the enemy, or seeing friends or civilians killed. Reactions can include tension, anxiety, substance abuse, and fear of attack in civilian settings.
LOAD-DATE: August 15, 2005




263 of 675 DOCUMENTS

Copyright 2005 Boston Herald Inc.

The Boston Herald
August 15, 2005 Monday

FIRST EDITION
SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 005
LENGTH: 466 words
HEADLINE: `Marine of the Year' charged in shooting
BYLINE: By O'Ryan Johnson and Marie Szaniszlo
BODY:

Marine reservist Daniel Cotnoir, accused of firing into a raucous crowd and injuring two youths early Saturday, was a changed man when he came back from Iraq last year, a friend told the Herald.

``The Iraq war has come to Lawrence,'' said the friend, who asked not to be identified. ``He's been very, very stressed out since he came back. This is a result of him serving overseas . . . It really isn't that surprising. He needs some help.''

Cotnoir, 33, a married Lawrence mortician with two children and the 2005 Marine Corps Times ``Marine of the Year,'' is charged with two counts of attempted murder after he allegedly fired his shotgun from his apartment window. Witnesses said someone in the unruly crowd leaving a nearby nightclub had thrown a bottle through his window, and may have thrown something before that.

Cotnoir has a history of complaints about the nightclub and had already called police when he allegedly opened fire. Bullet fragments wounded Lissette Cumba, 15, and Kelvin Castro, 20, both of Lowell.

One fragment hit Cumba in the neck, narrowly missing an artery. Castro was hit in the leg. Both were released from the hospital yesterday.

Cumba's cousin said the man in the apartment window had been staring down at them for as long as 20 minutes. Someone threw something against the house. Then Castro's mother saw the man had a gun. The youth who threw the first object came back a few minutes later and threw the bottle through the window.

``That's when he put in the bullets and pointed the gun out the window,'' said Cumba. ``I was trying to get inside the car. I was scared. I didn't have time to think.''

Then several shots sounded, Cumba and others said. She felt something warm on her neck and reached up to feel blood.

As Cumba recovered at home yesterday, another cousin talked about Cotnoir's status as a traumatized
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