Africana Studies Program Components



Download 39.88 Kb.
Date conversion19.05.2016
Size39.88 Kb.

Africana Studies Requirements 2010 - current | Page

Africana Studies

Program Components


The Africana Studies Department is multidisciplinary, with some of its faculty holding joint appointments in other departments. The department’s offerings thus range across the traditional disciplines of art history, history, literature, musicology, philosophy, religion, health and sociology. These disciplines are integrated by certain themes that underscore the uniqueness of the department. First, subject matter focuses on African peoples and cultures and peoples of African descent in the New World. Second, the department’s courses offer a non-Eurocentric and non-racial approach to the investigations, interpretations and understanding of the experiences of African peoples and of the wider world. Third, departmental courses broaden the scope and range of traditional disciplines and offer a corrective to those disciplines in which the knowledge of the presence, roles, cultural contributions and experiences of African people and their descendants have been omitted or neglected.

The department attracts students of all ethnic backgrounds. Both minority and non-minority students benefit from exposure to academic materials and perspectives not otherwise available to them.

All the department’s courses satisfy Harpur College writing requirements. A single, double or cross-disciplinary major (BA program) and minor in Africana Studies are available.

Requirements for Africana Studies Major


For the major, 11 courses (44 credits) must be taken in the department from department faculty only. These courses should be in the 100-400 levels reflecting academic growth, progressive competence and a course distribution that reflects the African and African Diaspora focus of the department. Of these, students should take:

A. Two generalist introductory courses:



  • AFST 101. Introduction to Africana Studies, or

  • AFST 171. Introduction to African Religion, or

  • AFST 175. Introduction to African Art, or

  • AFST 180R. Music of Africa, Caribbean & Latin America

B. (i) One disciplinary introductory permanent course:

  • AFST 273. Introduction to African Literature, or

  • AFST 214. HIP-HOP, or

  • AFST 212. African Intellectual Traditions, or

  • AFST 283A. Introduction to African History, or

  • AFST 283F. Islamic Cultures in Africa

(ii) One special topics introductory course:

  • AFST 200. Introduction to African Cinema, or

  • AFST 203. Afro-Brazilian & Caribbean Religions, or

  • AFST 205. African & Western Religions, or

  • AFST 235. Muslim Peoples, or

  • AFST 280D. Youth, Popular Culture in North Africa or

  • AFST 284C. Black Nationalism

C. (i) AFRICA: Select two topic courses. Prerequisite: Students must have taken relevant 100- or 200-level Africana Studies courses.

  • AFST 317. African Women & Feminism

  • AFST 367. African Kingship

  • AFST 373. The African Novel

  • AFST 376. African Cultural Traditions

  • AFST 377. West African History, 16th-20th Centuries

  • AFST 378. African Metaphysics

  • AFST 380A. Music Traditions of Africa

  • AFST 380N. Encountering the Orient

  • AFST 386F. Issues in Feminine Writings & Film

  • AFST 389F. African Metaphysics

  • AFST 477. Mediumistic Traditions

(ii) AFRICA DIASPORA: Select two topics courses. Prerequisite: Students must have taken relevant 100- or 200-level Africana Studies courses.

  • AFST 375. Muslim Social History to the 19th Century

  • AFST 379. Contemporary Art-African Diaspora

  • AFST 380B. Global Africa in the Long 1960s

  • AFST 370. Convivencia in Islamic Spain

  • AFST 372. Arabic Civilization & Culture

  • AFST 380E. The World in the 1960’s

  • AFST 384H. Global Black Movements

  • AFST 385E. African American Heritage in Poetry & Jazz

  • AFST 386A. Making of the African Diaspora

  • AFST 381A. Oral Histories & African Diaspora

  • AFST 480M. History & Memory

D. AFST 490 Senior Seminar, and any two advanced 400-level courses.

E. At least seven of the eleven Africana courses should be in the 300-400 levels and these should follow the Distribution Requirement.


General Requirement:


Students must earn a grade of C or above in courses fulfilling the major requirement. No courses fulfilling the major requirement may be taken Pass/Fail. Only one independent study course may be counted in fulfillment of the requirements for the major and this must be by an Africana Studies faculty. Students must take seven of 11 courses at Binghamton University for the major. Students may take cross-listed courses of non-Africana Studies faculty but only as electives. When appropriate, students can petition to have a different course count as fulfilling requirements for courses in Group A or B.

Departmental Honors Program


Exceptional students majoring in Africana Studies are considered for admission to the honors program upon the successful completion of six semesters or 96 credit hours (including at least 32 in Africana Studies).

The honors program consists of two courses taken in the senior year: AFST 497, Advanced Independent Study/Honors Research and AFST 499, Honors Thesis. Honors in Africana Studies are awarded to students who receive at least a B+ grade in Advanced Independent Study/Honors Research and at least an A– in Honors Thesis.

Students who wish to enroll in the honors program must have a cumulative and major/program 3.5 grade point average, must be recommended to the program by a faculty who will take responsibility for directing that student’s Honors Thesis and must be granted permission to participate in the program by the department chairperson. Interested students should apply in the spring semester of the junior year to the undergraduate studies director who solicits a sample of the student’s written work in Africana Studies courses and two letters of recommendation from appropriate faculty. Upon acceptance, a Change of Major, Degree or Specialization form is submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

Requirements for Africana Studies Minor


The minor in Africana Studies is designed to give students with majors in other fields a chance to have a supplementary discipline and focus that may combine their academic interests as well as future professional concerns. Students develop their programs with the advice of departmental faculty. Students may, for example, take a history, PPL, sociology, literature, music, women studies or religion concentration with the supervision of the Africana Studies faculty.

A minimum of six courses (24 credits) is required, including:



  • any one Africana Studies course at the 100-level

  • any two courses at the 200-level course

  • any two courses at the 300 upper-level

  • any one course at the 400 upper-level courses

Students must earn a grade of C or above in courses fulfilling the minor requirement. No courses fulfilling the minors requirement may be taken Pass/Fail. Students must take 3 of 6 courses at Binghamton University for the major.

Africana Studies Undergraduate Courses


AFST 101, INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES

A broad survey of some of the major themes in African, African American and other African diasporic experiences over a period of several hundred years. It centers on systems, movements and ideas that have transcended national, continental and oceanic boundaries - including slavery and emancipation, politics and religion, culture and identity, colonialism and nationalism. Overall, the course is an introduction to the making of the modern world, from the standpoint of black experiences globally.


AFST 171, INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN RELIGION

Wallis Budge defined African religion as “Ancestor Worship,” while a Greek historian also wrote that blacks were “the first to…honor the gods and to hold sacrifices and processions and festivals and other rites by which men honor the deity.” Thus, students are introduced to African conceptions of God and gods, ancestors and elders, witchcraft, sacrifices and wellness rituals.


AFST 175, INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN ART

A survey of some of the key concepts in art and aesthetics in the African and African Diaspora, focusing on certain art works and art forms. It attends to three basic questions: How was art conceived of historically? How was it conceived of in different African cultures and in the diaspora? And what are the critical aesthetic concepts and responses that are relevant in art appreciation in these regions of the world. It also examines the dispersal and deployment of African symbols and ideas in the works of artists around the world.


AFST 180R MUSIC OF AFRICA, CARIBBEAN & LATIN AMERICA

An introduction to the study of world music through an examination of both traditional and popular music styles from different music cultures within Africa, the Caribbean and the Americas with emphasis on the specific social and cultural backgrounds that have generated and sustained them. Topics include the influences between traditional and popular music, the social status and training of musicians and performers cross-culturally, the world music business and music exchanges between musicians from diverse cultural backgrounds.


AFST 188B AFRICAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE

This ensemble focuses on various styles of traditional music from the African continent and the Diaspora including Cuba, Brazil and Haiti. Emphasis is on rhythmic development, as well as notation and ensemble cohesiveness. It explores both drumming and melodic instruments such as the xylophone and Mbira, as well as singing. No prior musical experience is necessary.
AFST 203, AFRO-BRAZ. & CARIBBEAN RELIGIONS

In a journey more than geographic, Africans in the New World lost all symbolic means of their religious expressions. Still, African religions and cultures survived to play critical roles in forging new religions. How? For answers, students explores the hermeneutical ways in which African descended groups contextualized their environment and created syncretistic religions like Candomblé, Santeria, Voodoo, Obeah, and Rastafari.


AFST 205, AFRICAN & WESTERN RELIGIONS

The course introduces students to African religion, Christianity and Islam in Africa, and the resultant religious and cultural transformation of Africa. This “triple” religious and cultural heritage has seriously affected African attitude toward religion and spirituality. Therefore, the course explores African theological concepts and ancestor worship, Christian and Islamic beliefs, and the dynamic transformation of Christianity and Islam on Africans.


AFST 212, AFRICAN INTELLECTUAL TRADITIONS

Introduction to key ideas in African intellectual and philosophical traditions, centered on conceptions of person, society, community, knowledge, art, gender relations and spirituality. Readings will vary from year to year at the discretion of instructor and are determined in advance.


AFST 214, HIP-HOP

Focuses on the oral communication, public presentation and public performance modes of this urban expressive culture, ranging from rhyme composition, rap, spoken word poetry, freestyling, singing and comedy routines. It analyzes hip-hop trends and aesthetics and studies the assumptions, visions and social ideologies underlying this cultural phenomenon.


AFST 235 (also HIST 235), MUSLIM PEOPLES

Cross-disciplinary survey of Muslim people from seventh to 20th century. Part I introduces Islam as a religious, ethical, legal, social, political and economic system. Part II surveys Muslim people and communities in Central Asia, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South America, Sudan, Swahili-speaking East Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Topics include ethnicity, gender, relations with the West, legal and social reforms, internal Muslim/non-Muslim relations and Muslim perceptions of the future.


AFST 273 (also ENG 391), INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN LITERATURE

Introduction to the major forms of literary activity on the African continent. Begins with an examination of the oral literature, then moves to a study of modern African creative writing through readings of some published fiction, drama and poetry, paying close attention to the ways in which the writers relate to the oral traditions.


AFST 280D YOUTH, POPULAR CULTURE IN NORTH AFRICA

This course introduces students to recent North African and Arabic youth culture, with a focus on their responses and participations in the modern popular culture. It explores the ways in which young North Africans and Arabs use and are influenced by global popular culture. It also explores their attitudes, interests, aspirations and creative and cultural expressions in film, television, print and music.


AFST 280F INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN CINEMA

This course offers a basic view of the development of the art of the film in Africa. We shall examine the history of the form on the continent, then explore its major themes and concerns with showings of several videos from various parts of Africa to ensure adequate coverage of the continent.


AFST 282 (also ENG 282), AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE 1920 TO PRESENT

Introduces African American literature of the period through poetry, the novel, short story and drama in the context of social, political and literary developments. Topics include the Harlem Renaissance, Richard Wright and the Naturalists, the Black Arts Movement, black women writers.


AFST 283A INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY

African social, political and economic history from the Pharaonic period to the mid-20th century. Social, political and economic organization; religion and philosophy; education; women’s roles and achievements; inter-African and international relations; slavery; internal and external migrations; resistance to European rule; nationalism; liberation movements; effects of European rule; problems of independence and post-independence; African peoples’ contributions to civilization.


AFST 283F ISLAMIC CULTURES IN AFRICA

Introduction to Islamic cultural productions in North, West, East and South Africa from the advent of Islam to modern times. Focuses on literature, music, architecture and films in studying the syncretism of Islam and indigenous African religions and/or cultures and in highlighting the unifying cultural influences of the religion. Attends also to factors and issues of artistic production.


AFST 284C BLACK NATIONALISM IN THE UNITED STATES

This course traces the evolution of black nationalism from the era of the United States revolution to the 1960s. Though a persistent theme in the African American experience, black nationalism has tended to become especially influential at certain historical junctures, most notably the 1850s, the 1920s and the 1960s. The course is centered on these junctions, called black nationalist moments and is organized around the core issues of race, nationality, class and gender.


AFST 317, AFRICAN WOMEN AND FEMINISM

An interdisciplinary approach to issues of importance to African women drawing extensively from a range of theoretical writings, literary and/or filmic works to study the political, social and economic roles of women. Paying close attention to culture, it examines the impact of colonialism, nationalism, dictatorship and military rule on women's autonomy, agency and rights within and outside the family.


AFST 367, AFRICAN KINGSHIP

As living ancestors, African kings and queens were seen as socio-political and spiritual leaders. However, the kingship nowadays does not enjoy the same power and authority as the past. Why? The course, therefore, studies divine kingship, systems of succession, king-making rites, and how the West undermined the authority of traditional rulers through policies like assimilation and direct and indirect rule.



AFST 370, CONVIVENCIA IN ISLAMIC SPAIN

This course acquaints students with the culture of cohabitation of Muslims, Christians and Jews in Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain & Portugal) and the contribution of each of the groups to its greatness.


AFST 372 ARABIC CIVILIZATION & CULTURE

This course provides and overview of the Civilization and Culture of the Arabic peoples starting from their origins, the advent of Islam and its spreading, and continuing to the present.


AFST 373, THE AFRICAN NOVEL

Exploration of the development of the novel in Africa. Formal growth of the genre from the oral narrative traditions of the continent, through its attachment to European forms, to its present achievement in blending various traditions in the articulation of key issues such as colonialism and post-colonialism, social and political crisis and the role of women in contemporary African society.


AFST 375 (also HIST 375), MUSLIM SOCIAL HISTORY TO THE 19th CENTURY

Survey of evolution and development of selected Asian (Middle Eastern) and African Muslim societies from seventh to 19th century. Social structure institutions and concepts of Muslim societies. Prerequisites: at least sophomore standing. Recommended prerequisites:completion of basic course in history, sociology or anthropology.


AFST 376, AFRICAN CULTURAL TRADITIONS

Course examines African culture traditions through select representative African ethnic groups. It focuses on psychosocial and developmental ritual practices – gestation, naming, puberty, marriage, eldership, funerary and medico-magical rites – undergirding life cycles. The course looks at the viability of some of these cultural practices such as female genital mutilation (clitoridectomy), scarifications and killing and harvesting of albino bones for magico-medical rituals, as peoples attempt to re-order their lives in a rapidly changing world.


AFST 377 (also HIST 377), WEST AFRICAN HISTORY, 16th-20th CENTURIES

Course divided into two parts. Part I, survey of West African history, deals with social-political organization; trade; religion; kingdoms/empires/states; interstate and interregional relations; relations with Asia, Europe and Americas. Part II focuses on Ghana, Nigeria and Senegal and deals with servility/slavery; ethnic relations; education; women's activities; colonial impact; government; post-independence relations with selected Eastern and Western states and organizations.


AFST 378, AFRICAN METAPHYSICS

The course explores African view of the universe and the principles that shape the spiritual and corporeal worlds. Far from dualism or a bicameral cosmos, Africans perceive of the universe as a single cosmos, with the spiritual as their ideal home, however. This African perception of the universe also reflects their view of what it means to be a human. Thus, students are introduced to holistic personality concepts, their influence on society, religion, and the meaning of existence.

Prerequisite: AFST 171, Introduction to African Religion, or any 100- or 200-level Africana Studies course.

AFST 379, CONTEMPORARY ART: AFRICA/DIASPORA

This course explores contemporary visual arts of Africa and the African diaspora in the last three decades. It studies how African and African Diaspora artists and art theorists in Africa, Europe, America and the Caribbean have influenced and interacted with one another in this globalized world of migrations, global co-operations, biennales, and exhibitions. While studying how these interactions have been informed by the cultures and civilizations in the respective regions, the course also highlights the conceptual and methodological issues that are of interest to artists in this expansive tri-dimensional world.


AFST 380B GLOBAL AFRICA IN THE LONG 1960s

The decade of the 1960s, along with the years before and after, were among the most tumultuous and epoch-making of the modern era. Indeed, the long 1960s marked something of a turning point and its impact remains very much with us in ways large and small. This course focuses on the long 1960s in the black world – mainly Africa and the Americas – through an examination of various themes. Notable among those are decolonization and desegregation, the rise of new political and social movements, the emergence of novel cultural and artistic form and the renaissance in feminism.


AFST 380N ENCOUNTERING THE ORIENT

For centuries, Europe looked at the Arab-Islamic lands as a place of romance and exotic beings, a fascination that was mixed with fear and resentment that led to the demonization of both space and people. The course focuses on how Western travelers perceived the observed societies and people of North Africa and how they passed their perceptions to their countrymen.


AFST 381A ORAL HISTORIES & AFRICAN DIASPORA

Course looks at the Black Experience in terms of oral histories provided by people who lived and worked during the 1940s through the 1960s; fighting for workers rights, human rights and diasporic workings of society and its views at the times. We will listen to recorded interviews, televised documentaries and readings from citizens who strove to achieve equality and peace through movements associated with the Black Movements during the early 1960s and beyond


AFST 384H GLOBAL BLACK MOVEMENTS

This course examines black movements globally over a three-decade period, from the end of World War II to the mid-1970s. Major themes include the impact of World War II and the Cold War on global Africa and on black movements, decolonization in Africa and the Caribbean, the challenges of independence, guerrilla warfare and national liberation in the African territories untouched by decolonization, apartheid in South Africa, Civil Rights in the United States and Black Power in North America, South Africa, Brazil and the Caribbean.


AFST 385E AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE IN POETRY & JAZZ

Jazz music and poetry are two forms of artistic expression that have developed side by side in the movement of African American culture from the oral tradition. Following this parallel development through the crucial stages of African American history, the course examines the ways the two art forms have responded to successive social and political contexts; and some modes of interaction between the music and the poetry, especially in the phenomenon of “jazz poetry.”



AFST 386A MAKING THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

The seminar focuses on the central question of the identity of descendants of Africa? Is this identity dependent on where these individuals live today or where they originated? Do they have a national or a global identity? Is it static or dynamic? What are the forces within and without these communities that shape this identity? Gender? Economics? Culture? We will also assess the ways in which scholars and other writers have formulated theories of the African Diaspora.


AFST 386F ISSUES IN FEMININE WRITINGS & FILMS

Common themes found in the writings and cinema by women in North Africa include the questioning of tradition, recovery of identity, re-description of stereotypes and resistance to further “servitude / colonization.” The themes raise questions that lead to the examination of Maghribi artistic and literary production such as poems, essays, fiction and cinema. The course examines relations of the female self and other that are expressed in formal properties as well as in the subject and contents of written and cinematic texts.


AFST 389F ISSUES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN HEALTH

This course is designed to address issues involved in the health of African Americans. Students will be provided with a comprehensive overview of historical forces and social factors related to the health behavior and status of African-Americans. Students will analyze the impact of cultural, educational, social, economic, political and environmental influences on health of African Americans. A multi-disciplinary perspective entailing history, sociology, social psychology, anthropology, biology and genetics, epidemiology, and public health will be offered by way of reading assignments, didactic instruction, class discussions and course assignments.


AFST 397, INDEPENDENT STUDY

Meets special needs and interests of advanced students on tutorial or seminar basis. It can only be taught by Africana faculty. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.


AFST 477, MEDIUMISTIC TRADITIONS

As seers, healers, reformers, musicians, and advisors, mediums announce the will of the ancestors and deities, perform rituals, call society to order, sing and dance to ancient tunes, and admonish elders and rulers to follow traditions of their ancestors. The course, then, is a critical study of the clerical vocation and role of mediums as final religious arbiters in Africa.


AFST 481E AFRICAN FEMINISM

Explores the development of feminist discourses in Africa with respect to problems in contemporary African social, political and cultural life. Some of the key concerns center on the manipulation of tradition, family relations, cultural values and the role of the law. The course examines how some of the compelling issues have engaged African women scholars as they battled the gender discrimination of the postcolonial state as well as of African men.
AFST 482B IDEALOGIES OF BLACK CREATIVITY

Seminar explores the underlying ideologies informing and regulating forms of creative expression in diverse regions of Africa and/or the African Diaspora.

AFST 483A AUTOBIOGRAPHIES – AFRICAN, AFRICAN AMERICAN, CARIBBEAN

The two basic objectives of this course are (1) to understand the logic and nature of autobiographical statements – why do people write autobiographies and to what extent are these autobiographies accurate accounts of their lives? And (2) to understand the peculiar nature of autobiographies produced in black societies with histories of racial or colonial domination. What do they have in common with standard Western autobiographies and what are the noticeable differences between them?
AFST 490, SENIOR SEMINAR Advanced general survey and analysis of critical problems in Africana studies. Prerequisites: senior standing.
AFST 491, TEACHING PRACTICUM

Independent study through teaching in particular Africana studies course. Course instructor directs students in preparation of syllabi, other course materials, devising and reading examinations; lecturing and/or leading discussion; academic counseling. May be repeated for a total of no more than eight credits. Credit may not be earned in conjunction with course in which student is currently enrolled. Does not satisfy majoror Harpur Distribution requirements. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Pass/Fail only.


AFST 495, INTERNSHIP PROJECT

Internship project under guidance of faculty member, in an institution, agency or program. Written analytical term report of project work required. Prerequisites: prior arrangement with and consent of chosen instructor. Four credits of internship may be counted toward major.


AFST 497, ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


AFST 499, HONORS THESIS

Honors essay for seniors, under supervision of faculty member. Prerequisites: approval must be given by director of undergraduate studies and the faculty member concerned.


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page