African-american and african studies



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African American and African Studies

Spring 2006 Course Offering Directory


(updated Jan. 19, 2006)
AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND AFRICAN STUDIES
AAS 102 - Crosscurrents of the African Diaspora (4)

Prof. Corey Walker

TR 12:30 – 1:45

MCL 2014
This introductory course builds upon the histories of people of African descent in Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean surveyed in AAS 101. Drawing on disciplines such as Anthropology, History, Religious Studies, Political Science and Sociology, the course focuses on the period from the late 19th century to the present and is comparative in perspective. It examines the links and disjunctions between communities of African descent in the United States and in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. The course begins with an overview of AAS, its history, assumptions, boundaries, and topics of inquiry, and then proceeds to focus on a number of inter-related themes: patterns of cultural experience; community formation; comparative racial classification; language and society; family and kinship; religion; social and political movements; arts and aesthetics; and archaeology of the African Diaspora.


AAS 366: African American History Since 1865 (3)

Prof. Claudrena Harold

TR 9:30 – 10:45

MRY 115


This course examines the major political, economic, and cultural developments in black America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics to be explored include blacks’ varied response to the rise of Jim Crow; the social and political upheavals brought about by the massive migration of Southern blacks to the industrial North during the First and Second World Wars; the achievements and failures of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements; and the continuing significance of race in American society. This course will explore the political careers of such noted black activists as Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, A. Philip Randolph, Marcus Garvey, Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, Angela Davis, Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. Significant attention will also be given to lesser known freedom fighters who struggled to create a more democratic America. Possible textbooks for the course include Tera Hunter’s To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War, Robin D.G. Kelley’s Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression, Beth Tompkins Bates’ Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945, Charles Payne’s I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Struggle, Barbara Ransby’s Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision, William L. Van Deburg’s New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975, Robert F. Williams’ Negroes With Guns, Komozi Woodard’s Freedom North: Black Freedom Struggles Outside the South, 1940-1980, Toni Cade Bambara’s The Black Woman Anthology, and Ronald W. Walters’ Freedom is Not Enough: Black Voters, Black Candidates and American Presidential Politics. Students will read an average of 200 pages per week. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, three quizzes, and three exams.

AAS 406A - Mapping Race, Place, and Diaspora (3)

Prof. Scot French

W 1:00 – 3:30

CAB 247
This upper-level research seminar invites students to immerse themselves in the latest scholarship on race, space, and diaspora while participating in community-based research projects sponsored by the Carter G. Woodson Institute's Center for the Study of Local

Knowledge (CSLK). Funded by a grant from the Ford Foundation, the CSLK seeks to bridge the traditional divide between universities and local communities by creating new models for intellectual and social exchange between academic and lay scholars.
During the first six weeks of the class, students will work closely with the instructor to develop individual research projects using original source materials related to African American life in Central Virginia. Students will meet with lay scholars and activists to

explore possibilities for collaboration. Special training sessions will be held in U.Va.'s new media/humanities computing centers to ensure that students are well-acquainted with new technologies to aid their research. During the second six weeks of the class, each

student will produce a significant work of scholarship (subject to prior approval by the instructor) for incorporation into a community project. The final exam will consist of a formal, 10-minute presentation to the research seminar and invited guests.
AAS 406 E - Afro-Brazilian Civilization (3)

Prof. David Haberly

MWF 11:00 to 11:50

CAB 331
A general introduction, in English, to the literature and culture of Brazil from 1500 to the present, with special emphasis upon the role of Afro-Brazilians in the creation of that literature and culture. No knowledge of Portuguese is required, and lectures and readings will be in English. The course includes discussions of the nation's social and historical development, but these topics will be presented through readings in the major works of Brazilian literature, including the works of important Afro-Brazilian authors. (Enrollment restricted to participants in Brazil Study Abroad program. Meets same time and place as POTR 427.)



AMERICAN STUDIES
AMST 201A - Arts of the Harlem Renaissance (3)

Prof. Carmenita Higginbotham

TR 11:00 – 12:15

WIL 216
This course will survey the visual arts (painting, sculpture, photography prints) as well as literature, music and film of the Harlem Renaissance. Students are introduced to the cultural, historical, political and social issues framing the development of the movement and its defining critical anthology, The New Negro Movement. Presented both chronologically and thematically, this course will interrogate issues of artistic identity, gender, patronage and the aesthetic influences of the African Diaspora on African American artists during the 1920s and early 1930s. Students will be exposed to the work of such legendary figures such as Alain Locke, W.E.B. DuBois, Meta Warrick Fuller, Aaron Douglas, Archibald Motley Jr., Langston Hughes and Paul Robeson.



ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 225 - Racism, Nationalism, Multiculturalism (3)

Prof. Richard Handler

MW 2:00 – 3:15

MRY 209 3 credits


Introductory course in which the concepts of culture, multiculturalism, race, racism, and nationalism are critically examined in terms of how they are used and structure social relations in American society and, by comparison, how they are defined in other cultures throughout the world.
ANTH 565 - Creole Narratives (3)

Prof. George Mentore

MW 2:00 – 3:15

CAB 338
We begin with 18th- and 19th-century Caribbean intellectual life. We do so from the perspective of European imperialism and its influences upon colonized values, slavery, race, class and color. We examine the persistence of these major themes through the 20th century, formalized in the battle of ideas between the elite of the mother country and the Creole upper classes. We will attempt to read the images of the Creole self and explore their claims for a crisis of identity. We will also focus on the so-called spiritual character of the Creole personality. We shall conclude by looking at the way in which the specifics of island culture have directed nation building and how they appear to have helped in the perpetuation of ideological and political dependencies.



COMMON COURSES – SOCIAL SCIENCES
CCSS 200 - Rural Poverty in Our Time (3)

Prof. Grace Hale

W 2:00 – 4:50

PHS 203
This course will use an interdisciplinary format to explore the history of non-urban poverty in the American South from the 1930s to the present. Weaving together the social histories of poor people, the political history of poverty policies, and the history of representations of poverty, the course follows historical cycles of attention and neglect: rural poverty during the Great Depression, rural poverty from the war on poverty to the Reagan Revolution, and rural poverty in the new Gilded Age, the present. In each section, we will examine the relationship between representations (imagining poverty),

policies (alleviating poverty), and results (the effects of those representations and policies in the economic, political, and psychological status of poor people).

ENGLISH
ENAM 314 - African American Survey II (3)

Prof. Lisa Woolfork

TR 9:30 – 10:45

CAB 215 3 credits


Continuation of ENAM 313, this course begins with the career of Richard Wright and brings the Afro-American literary and performing tradition up to the present day.
ENAM 482E - Fictions of Black Identity (3)

Prof. Lisa Woolfork

TR 11:00 – 12:15

BRN 332
No description available.


ENCR 482 - Race in American Places (3)

Prof. Ian Grandison

T 6:30 – 9:00

BRN 330
Race in American Places is an inter-disciplinary seminar that explores ways in which multi-cultural negotiations in American society (especially around notions of racial difference) are embedded in places. We consider, for instance, how the innocent children's story, The Three Little Pigs, teaches us to draw particular conclusions about the moral standing of people (or pigs) based on the materials and architectural styles of the places where they live, recreate, work, or study. We contemplate the ways such places as Charlottesville's Downtown Mall, although thought of as belonging to the "public," are planned and designed to welcome some members of the public while discouraging use by others. Ever wondered about what the coincidence of homelessness and home-owners' associations implies about assumptions of a relationship between the right to privacy and personal wealth in American society? Or are the places within the typical American home gendered? We explore issues such as these via targeted discussion of readings, mandatory visits to places around Charlottesville, informal workshops, and in-class presentations. Course requirements include three informal small group exercises, an individual site-visit comment paper, a mid-term and a final exam, and a small group research project. The last requirement is presented in an informal symposium that culminates our semester's work.


ENGN 422/ENMC 482 - African American Drama (3)

Prof. Lotta Lofgren

TR 12:30 – 1:45

CLK 101
We will survey African-American drama from the 1950's to the present. We will place the drama in relation to established norms, investigating the motives and methods of the playwrights for carving out new ground. We will examine the shared and divergent concerns of male and female playwrights, their sense of audience, the dilemma of writing as an individual and as a member of a group silenced too long, their relationship to the past, the present, and the future. We will also examine the changing definitions of the black aesthetic. Playwrights include, among others, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Ntozake Shange, August Wilson, and Suzan-Lori Parks.


ENLT 214M - Modern American Race and Ethnicity (3)

Prof. Jolie Sheffer

MW 3:30 – 4:45

CAB 324
This class looks at major American authors of the twentieth century through the lens of place. In American literature, race and ethnicity are not merely descriptive terms, they are lived conditions. To be a raced or ethnic subject is to live in a different America, sometimes a physically segregated one, sometimes a metaphoric one. The authors we study in this course portray the geography of race and ethnicity in different ways. America can be a promised land, a prison, a museum, or an elevator shaft, among other things.


ENLT 247 - Black Writers and Black Music (3)

Prof. Erich Nunn

TR 5:00 – 6:15

WIL 216
No description available


ENLT 255M - New World Colonialism (3)

Prof. Anna Brickhouse

T 6:30 – 9:00

BRN 332
This course will examine American exploration and colonization in a comparative context, reading English, French, and Spanish colonial accounts of New World encounter and considering a variety of genres and forms, including travel accounts, letters, poems, plays, and novels. We will pay special attention to the different functions that the theme of captivity performed within colonial American cultures. (All French and Spanish readings will be available in English translation.)


ENMC 484 - Inter-ethnic Fiction (3)

Prof. Caroline Rody

TF 12:30 – 1:45
Students in the Modern Studies Program will have first priority for admission to this seminar, which will consider American literature’s increasingly interethnic imagination, its engagement with the heterogeneity of contemporary American culture and with its hybrid literary heritage. Reading contemporary fiction and theory, we will consider cross-ethnic meeting not as a marginal concern, but as a constitutive element of ethnic identities, histories, and narratives. How does the encounter with ethnic/racial otherness shape the ethnic text's social and political vision, its reworking of literary and cultural forms and traditions, its handling of language(s), its representations of gendered identities and sexualities, and its engagement with traumatic histories? We will read stories and novels by contemporary American writers from widely diverse backgrounds, such as Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Michelle Cliff, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Sherley Anne Williams, Grace Paley, Lynne Sharon Schwartz, Lore Segal, Philip Roth, Jonathan Safran Foer, Sandra Cisneros, Bharati Mukherjee, Bapsi Sidwha, Gish Jen, Chang-Rae Lee, and Karen Tei Yamashita. We will also read theorists of race, ethnicity, and hybridity in literature and culture. Students are expected to be very active class participants; to write brief biweekly compositions, a short paper, and a long seminar paper; and with a partner to lead a class discussion.
ENWR 106 - Class Matters (3)

Peter Capuano

MWF 9:00 – 9:50

BRN 310
No description available.


ENWR 106 - Race in the U.S. (3)

Brian Roberts

TR 9:30 – 10:45

RAN 212
No description available.


ENWR 110 - Caribbean as U.S. Immigrant (3)

Alwin Jones

TR 3:30 – 4:45
No description available.


HEALTH EVALUATION SCIENCES
HES 536 - Health Disparities

Prof. Oliver Norman and Prof. Ruth Gaare

R 9:00 – 11:30
No description available.
HIAF 202 - Africa Since 1800 (4)

Prof. John Mason

TR 9:30 – 10:45

MCL 1003


This course explores the history of Africa from the decline of the Atlantic slave trade, in the early nineteenth century, to the present. Our goal is to examine the historical roots of the continent's current circumstances, both good and bad. We will look at the slave trade and its consequences, the European conquest of most of the African continent, African resistance to colonial rule, and the reestablishment of African independence. We will concentrate on three regions: West Africa, especially Nigeria; Central Africa, especially the Congo and Rwanda; and southern Africa, especially South Africa. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which colonialism affected ordinary Africans and with the various strategies that Africans employed to resist, subvert, and accommodate European domination. HIAF 202 is an introductory course and assumes no prior knowledge of African history.

HIAF 305 - History of West Africa (3)

Prof. James Lafleur

TR 11:00 – 12:15

MCL 1004
HIAF 305 is a lecture and discussion course that explores the history of West Africans in the wider context of the global past. Our course begins in very distant times, and traces currents of change from West Africans’ first attempts to make a living in ancient environments through their subsequent challenges and actions in the eras of the slave trades (trans-Saharan and Atlantic), colonial overrule by outsiders, political independence, and ever-increasing globalization. Though the course focuses primarily on those people living in the region, we will follow a select few to their new places of residence in rural America in the early Atlantic era and in urban centers in our times. The majority of course readings will be journal articles and book excerpts (to be made available on Toolkit). In addition, we are likely to use the following books in their near-entirety: Basil Davidson, West Africa before the Colonial Era: A History to 1850; Stephen Ellis, Mask of Anarchy: the Destruction of Liberia and the Religious Dimension of an African Civil War; Sandra Greene, Sacred Sites and the Colonial Encounter: A History of Meaning and Memory in Ghana; Paul Stoller, Money Has No Smell: The Africanization of New York City. Course requirements include active participation class discussions, four map quizzes, and three exams.


HIAF 403 - Landscape and Memory in Africa (3)

Prof. James Lafleur

R 1:00 – 3:30

WIL 141A

Far from being a “wilderness” untouched by human hands, Africa was the first landscape people domesticated physically and cognitively. HIAF 403 investigates the cultural geographies of Africa in historical terms, that is to say, how and why people have changed the meanings they attached to particular places over time and how those notions informed people’s actions. Following an initial introduction to the subject of collective memory, the course proceeds through several recent monographs that highlight African landscapes rich in history. A prospective reading list includes: Emmanuel Akyeampong, Between the Sea and the Lagoon: An Eco-Social History of the Anlo of Southeastern Ghana David William Cohen and E. S. Atieno Odhiambo, Siaya: The Historical Anthropology of an African Landscape James Fairhead and Melissa Leach, Misreading the African Landscape Robert Harms, Games Against Nature: An Eco-Cultural History of the Nunu of Equatorial Africa Mark Horton and John Middleton, The Swahili: The Social Landscape of a Mercantile Society Nancy Jacobs, Environment, Power, and Injustice: a South African History Terence Ranger, Voices from the Rocks: Nature, Culture, and the History in the Matopos Hills of Zimbabwe Rosalind Shaw, Memories of the Slave Trade: Ritual and Historical Imagination in Sierra Leone Tamara Giles-Vernick, Cutting the Vines of the Past: Environmental Histories of the Central African Rainforest Course requirements will include active participation in weekly seminar-format meetings, weekly exchange of reading notes, and progressively sophisticated and lengthy writing assignments culminating a final draft of research paper of at least 20 pages.

HIAF 404 - Independent Study in African History
HIAF 501 - Politics and Poverty Africa (3)

Prof. John Mason

T 1:00 – 3:30

CAB 139


I used to call this course "What's Wrong with Africa." The title was intentionally provocative. It reflected a view of Africa that continues to be reproduced daily on television, in magazines and newspapers, and even in movies. Teenagers with machine guns, babies with swollen bellies, the devastation of Aids, and bleak, unending poverty... This is the Africa that we too often see and read about. The image is, of course, misleading; Africa is by no means a continent-wide disaster area. But there is enough truth in these images of human suffering to cause Africans and non-Africans alike to ask, What's wrong? There are no simple answers to this question. HIAF 501 is an introduction to the difficult work of understanding Africa's multiple crises. We will look at the problem from a variety of different perspectives. We will examine both internal factors and Africa's relations with the rest of the world. We will read novels, journalism, polemics, and historical, political and environmental analyses by both African and non-African writers. At the end of the semester, students will write a paper in which they themselves investigate an aspect of the question. Students will write a two-page discussion paper on each week's reading. The paper is due in class every Tuesday. A 12 to 15 page essay on some aspect of Africa's crises will be due at the end of the semester. The long essay will account for approximately 50% of the final grade, the discussion papers about 30%, and class participation about 20%.

HILA 100- Gender and Ethnicity 20th Century Latin America (3)

Prof. Frederick Vallve

W 3:30 – 6

CAB B030


Most Latin Americans hailed the twentieth century as “Latin America’s century,” the triumph of liberalism at the end of the nineteenth century in most of the region, the “liberation” of most of the continent from colonial rule and the unstoppable march towards “order and progress” under the firm guidance of export-oriented economic policies would put Latin America on equal footing with its Northern neighbors and Europe. Yet this was hardly the case, by the end of the century Latin America had experienced three major revolutions as well as many minor ones, its relationship with the USA and Europe was definitely not on an equal footing, most of the region was beset with long periods of political dictatorship and persistent economic underdevelopment and poverty. Yet, in many ways it was indeed Latin America’s century. The impact of Latin American culture was felt throughout the world through literature, music and popular culture and “Latin-ness” became one of the century’s icons. This colloquium will look at the interaction between culture, politics and society in twentieth-century Latin America through readings and discussions focusing on gender and ethnicity. Readings: Klubock, Thomas, Contested Communities: Class, Gender and Politics in Chile’s El Teniente Copper Mine, 1904-1951; Donna Guy, Sex and Danger in Buenos Aires, Prostitution, Family and Nation in Argentina; Alejandro De la Fuente, A Nation for All: Race, Inequality and Politics in 20th Century Cuba; George Reid Andrews, Blacks and Whites in São Paulo, Brazil; Alma Guillermoprieto, Samba.

HIUS 100 - Southern Women’s History (3)

Prof. C. Janney

R 1:00 – 3:30

MCL 2007


This weekly seminar will explore nineteenth and twentieth century southern social and cultural history by examining the lives of white and black southern women. We will look at a range of women's lives and activities, from work to sexuality, paying careful attention to the ways in which race and class shaped women's experiences. Assignments will include diaries, autobiographies, novels, films, and monographs. Through discussion and the three papers, we will focus both on how women in the past understood their own lives, and how historians have used their writings in crafting contemporary understandings of southern history. This course also asks students to explore the different ways in which historians approach their craft. We will discuss how a variety of sources—both secondary (textbooks and monographs) and primary (diaries, letters, memoirs, etc.)—influence our construction of a historical narrative. In doing so, students will learn essential skills for participating in upper-level history courses at the University of Virginia and fulfill the second writing requirement. Required readings include: Victoria Bynum, Unruly Women; Drew Faust, Mothers of Invention; Lalita Tademy, Cane River; Harriet Keyserling, Against the Tide: One Woman's Political Struggle. There is also Course Packet of required readings for sale at The Copy Shop on Elliewood Avenue.

HIUS 309 - Civil War and History (3)

Prof. Gary Gallagher

TR 8:00 – 9:15

WIL 301
This course explores the era of the American Civil War with emphasis on the period 1861-1865. It combines lectures, readings, films, and class discussion to address such questions as why the war came, why the North won (or the Confederacy lost), how the war affected various elements of society, what was left unresolved at the end of the fighting, and how subsequent generations of Americans understood the conflict's meanings. Although this is not a course on Civil War battles and generals, about 50 per cent of the time in class will be devoted to military affairs, and we will make a special effort to tie events on the battlefield to life behind the lines. The course will be organized in two lecture meetings a week. Grades will be based on two geography quizzes (each 5% of the course grade), two take-home examinations (each 35% of the course grade), and a 7-page paper that integrates material from the lectures, readings, and films (20% of the course grade). Note: This course does not satisfy the second writing requirement. Required Books (some substitutions may be made): Edward Porter Alexander, Fighting for the Confederacy; John Q. Anderson, ed., Brokenburn: The Journal of Kate Stone, 1861-1868; Ira Berlin and others, eds., Free at Last; Jean Berlin, ed., Letters of a Civil War Nurse; Andrew Delbanco, ed., The Portable Abraham Lincoln; A. J. L. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, April-June 186; Glenn Linden and Thomas Pressly, eds., Voices from the House Divided; Frank Wilkeson, Turned Inside Out: Recollections of a Private Soldier.


HIUS 310 – Reconstruction (3)

Prof. C. Janney

MWF 10:00 – 10:50

WIL 216


This course explores a variety of post-Civil War transitions in the United States. We will discuss both southern and northern reactions to and participation in the rebuilding of a nation that had been pulled apart by four years of war. We will take into account the political response to reuniting the nation and northern perceptions of the defeated Confederacy. A great deal of the course, however, will focus on the southern experience. We will examine how southern whites grudgingly relinquished slaveholding, how the South experimented with less restrictive labor systems, and how African Americans attained limited civil and social equality. We will consider changing modes of economic and social life in both the North and the South, which concluded with the establishment of the Solid South (and debatably the nation) by the end of the 19th century. There will be two lectures each week (Mondays and Wednesdays). Each Friday will be dedicated to discussion. There will be two take-home examinations in the course and a 5-7 page research paper. Possible required readings to include: • Jean Edward Smith, Grant • Hans L. Trefousse, Andrew Johnson: A Biography • John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War • Jane Turner Censer, The Reconstruction of White Southern Womanhood • Stephen Kantrowitz, Benjamin Tillman and the Reconstruction of White Supremacy • Jane Dailey, Before Jim Crow: The Politics of Race in Postemancipation Virginia • Altina L. Waller, Feud: Hatfields, McCoys, and Social Change in Appalachia, 1860-1900. There is also Course Packet of required readings for sale at The Copy Shop on Elliewood Avenue.

HIUS 324 - 20th Century South (3)

Prof. Lori Schuyler

MW 2:00 – 2:50

RFN G004A

This course will explore the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the South in the twentieth century. Major themes of the course will include the rise and fall of legalized segregation, the development of a viable Republican party in the region, the role of southern reformers and activists, and the importance of historical memory. We will examine major events in the region from the perspectives of black southerners and white southerners, men and women, sharecroppers and landowners, Republicans and Democrats, moderates and activists. Readings for the course may include: W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk; Grace Lumpkin, To Make My Bread, Christopher MacGregor Scribner, Renewing Birmingham: Federal Funding and the Promise of Change, 1929-1979; Anne Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi.

HIUS 329 - Virginia from 1865 – Present (3)

Prof. George Gilliam

TR 12:30 – 1:45

RFN G004B

History is the study of change over time. This course will examine change in Virginia from about 1861 to the present. The course will especially follow six main topics: (a) the evolving nature of democracy in Virginia; (b) continuities and change between “Ol’ Virginny” and modern Virginia; (c) the role of Reconstruction in configuring Virginia’s racial and political divisions; (d) the resolution of the conflict between Funders and Readjusters into Virginia’s “pay-as-you-go” philosophy; (e) social and cultural change in Virginia; and (f) the rural machine politics of Harry F. Byrd. Written history is compiled by historians working from various sources of uneven quality and in various times, subject to a wide variety of influences. This course will--in connection with the study of Virginia history--consider the sources available to historians of Virginia, and will examine several of the ways historians have made use of source materials at different times and under various influences. The course will help students develop their skills of critical understanding and analysis of various types of materials. Readings will average approximately 100 pages per week, and will be drawn from both primary documents and secondary material. Among the readings will be selections from: Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction; Jane Daily, Before Jim Crow: The Politics of Race in Postemancipation Virginia; Edward L. Ayers, The Promise of the New South; Charles Pearson, The Readjuster Movement in Virginia; Nancy and Charles Perdue, Talk About Trouble; and Ronald Heinemann, Harry Byrd of Virginia. The class will meet twice per week. Approximately half of each class will be spent in lecture and half in a class discussion. There will be a multiple choice/short answer mid-term exam, one 5-7 page paper involving the use of primary source materials, one group project, and a final examination requiring one short and one long essay.

HIUS 330 - History of UVA in the 20th Century (3)

Prof. Phyllis Leffler

TR 11:00 – 12:15

CAB 332


We hear much about "Mr. Jefferson's University" in its nineteenth century beginnings, but little about how it evolved toward the nationally and internationally prominent institution it is today. How did this evolution occur? What 19th century values are still recognizable? How did tradition and change intersect throughout the 20th century? Who were the individuals who helped to lead this university, and what were their pressing concerns? How does this university compare to others in the region and in the nation at specific moments in time? These are some of the questions we will explore. To fully understand this university, however, it will be necessary to know something about the context of the growth of higher education in the United States. Issues of administration, student culture, academic culture, and state and federal initiatives in higher education will be integrated into the course. Course readings/assignments include the following: Christopher Lucas, American Higher Education: A History; Susan Tyler Hitchcock, The University of Virginia: A Pictorial Histor. Course packet at Brillig Books (ca. 300 pages) Web-based readings of primary documents, student papers, exhibits Use of alumni surveys by Lawn residents and women before 1970 (both in Special Collections and on database) Oral history project based on database created from oral history collection or analysis of new material from the UVA Oral History Archives. Written assignments will include an evaluation of alumni questionnaires (ca. 5 pages), a mid-term take home paper (5-7 pp.), an oral history project and paper (ca. 5-7 pages), and a final paper (ca. 10-12 pages). There will be no in-class exams. This course meets the second writing requirement, and will be of interest to students in American History, American Studies, Women's Studies, African-American History, Education. The course will use discussion of assigned readings extensively.

HIUS 350 - 20th Century U.S. Social Policy (3)

Prof. Guian McKee

MW 3:30 – 4:45

CAB 345


This course will examine the historical relationship between work, poverty, and the development of social policy in the United States during the twentieth century. Topics of particular focus will include the changing structure of the American workplace, shifts in societal conceptions about the place of the state in American life, and alterations in both the nature of poverty and perceptions of the poor in the United States. We will examine the interaction of these issues in shaping social policy, as well as the role of race, gender, and political economy in defining these important dimensions of twentieth century American life. As a result, the course will approach the history of American social policy from the “ground up” and from the “top down”: we will study both the origin and development of broad public policy structures and the experiences of Americans (both elites and non-elites) who determined the course of such policies and lived with their results. Students will engage in detailed historical explorations of progressivism, labor organizing, maternalist welfare policies, workplace reform, Social Security, AFDC (welfare), public housing, urban renewal, employment policy, job training, the War on Poverty, Medicare and Medicaid, the welfare rights movement, and the reaction against the welfare state. The course will conclude with an examination of critical social policy developments in the last fifteen years, including the failure of the Clinton health care plan, the Welfare Reform Act of 1996, and recent proposals for social security and Medicare reform. While primarily a lecture course, this class will provide extensive opportunities for student discussion of assigned readings and other materials. Course requirements will include a research paper of approximately 10 pages, a mid-term and final, regular attendance, and active participation in class discussions. The weekly reading will average 150 pages. Texts may include Michael B. Katz, In the Shadow of the Poorhouse: A Social History of Welfare in America; Molly Ladd-Taylor, Mother-Work: Women, Child Welfare, and the State, 1890-1930; Theda Skocpol, Social Policy in the United States: Future Possibilities in Historical Perspective; Jill Quadagno, The Color of Welfare: How Racism Undermined The War on Poverty; Ira Katznelson, When Affirmative Action Was White; David Shipler, The Working Poor: Invisible in America, as well as scholarly articles, primary sources, films, and other historical material.

HIUS 366 - Afro-American History Since 1865 (3)

Prof. Claudrena Harold

TR 9:30 – 10:45

MRY 115


This course examines the major political, economic, and cultural developments in black America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Topics to be explored include blacks’ varied response to the rise of Jim Crow; the social and political upheavals brought about by the massive migration of Southern blacks to the industrial North during the First and Second World Wars; the achievements and failures of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements; and the continuing significance of race in American society. This course will explore the political careers of such noted black activists as Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, A. Philip Randolph, Marcus Garvey, Ella Baker, Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, Angela Davis, Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. Significant attention will also be given to lesser known freedom fighters who struggled to create a more democratic America. Possible textbooks for the course include Tera Hunter’s To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War, Robin D.G. Kelley’s Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression, Beth Tompkins Bates’ Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945, Charles Payne’s I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Struggle, Barbara Ransby’s Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision, William L. Van Deburg’s New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975, Robert F. Williams’ Negroes With Guns, Komozi Woodard’s Freedom North: Black Freedom Struggles Outside the South, 1940-1980, Toni Cade Bambara’s The Black Woman Anthology, and Ronald W. Walters’ Freedom is Not Enough: Black Voters, Black Candidates and American Presidential Politics. Students will read an average of 200 pages per week. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, three quizzes, and three exams.

HIUS 367 - History of the Civil Rights Movement (3)

Prof. Julian Bond

TR 2:00 – 2:50

WIL 402


This lecture course examines the history, philosophies, tactics, events and personalities of the Southern movement for civil rights from 1900 through the late 1960s, with special concentration on the years from the mid-'40s forward. The Southern movement - variously called the black struggle, the freedom fight, or the civil rights movement - was a black-lead, interracial mass movement which effectively ended legal segregation by the mid-60s. Lectures will outline the movement's three over-lapping and occasionally complimentary phases - lobbying, litigation and protest. In the first phase, from 1910 to the middle '30s, it developed a campaign of propaganda, education and lobbying to shape public opinion and create a climate favorable to civil rights. In phase 2, from the '30s to the '50s, it sought and won important test cases in housing segregation and the right to vote, and attacking separate and unequal schools. The last phase, lasting a decade from '54 through '65, was a decade of protests - boycotts, sit-ins, and mass demonstrations - as well as grass-roots organizing campaigns that laid the groundwork for minority electoral victories in the late '60s and '70s. Through the leadership of various national and local organizations, and through anti-segregation campaigns directed by indigenous and extra-communal leadership figures who built on extensive pre-existing networks of church, fraternal, social and labor organizations, drawing strength and followers from a protest community rooted in black America and created in response to white supremacy, the movement succeeded in eliminating legal segregation. The movement's well-known and lesser-known proponents and their strategies will be examined. Grades will be determined from a final examination, student participation in sections, and two five- to seven-page papers. Texts and videos: Roy Wilkins (with Tom Matthews), Standing Fast; James Forman, The Making of Black Revolutionaries; Julian Bond and Andrew Lewis, Gonna Sit at the Welcome Table, "Eyes on the Prize - America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965", # 1 to 6; "America at the Racial Crossroads, 1965 - 1985,” # 1 and 2; "The Road to Brown.”

HIUS 401 - African American Protest in the 20th Century (4)

Prof. Claudrena Harold

T 1:00 – 3:30

MCL 2007


This seminar examines African Americans' protracted struggle against racist practices and institutional structures, economic exploitation, and cultural imperialism. To better understand the diversity and breadth of black oppositional activity in the twentieth-century, students will examine the protest activities of a number of black leaders and movement organizations, including Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Cyril Briggs and the African Blood Brotherhood, Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association, Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam, Angela Davis, Huey Newton and the Black Panther Party, Fannie Lou Hamer and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, the Deacons of Self-Defense, and the League of Revolutionary Black Workers. Significant attention will be given to their debates over the best way to deal with the economic consequences of white supremacy and global capitalism, the usefulness of armed self-defense as a weapon in the fight against racial injustice, and the problem of sexism within the black liberation movement. Over the course of the semester, students will be introduced to the research methods and techniques used by historians. We will not only explore historians’ use of oral and written texts, but will also reflect on the ways in which scholars’ theoretical and political viewpoints inform their interpretation of primary sources. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their historical skills through a series of assignments designed to assist them in identifying research topics and questions; interpreting primary texts; and substantiating arguments with historical evidence. Possible texts for the course include W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, Manning Marable’s W.E.B. Du Bois: Black Radical Democrat, Angela Davis’ Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday, Lance Hill’s The Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement, Earl Lewis’ In Their Own Interests: Race, Class, and Power in Twentieth-Century Norfolk, Virginia, William Sales’ From Civil Rights to Black Liberation: Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity, Charles Payne’s I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Struggle, and Manning Marable’s The Great Wells of Democracy: The Meaning of Race in American Life.
MEDIA STUDIES
MDST 356 - Jim Crow and American Cinema (3)

Prof. Robert Jackson

T 3:30 – 6:30

CAB 311
No description available.


MUSIC
MUSI 207 - Roots Music in America (3)

Prof. Richard Will

MW 10:00 – 10:50

MRY 209
According to mainstream media, "roots music" like gospel, blues, country, folk, and bluegrass nourishes more popular genres such as rock and hip-hop, while also expressing the emotional and social concerns of (mainly) rural African-American and White American communities. We will examine both claims by studying the origins and development of roots genres and the way they are depicted in films, criticism, politics, and elsewhere.


MUSI 208 - African American Gospel Music (3)

Prof. Melvin Butler

TR 2:00 – 3:15

OCH 107
No description available.


MUSI 309 - Performance in Africa (4)

Michelle Kisliuk

TR 3:30 – 4:20

OCH 107
No description available.


MUSI 312 - Jazz Studies (3)

Prof. Scott Deveaux

MW 2:00 – 3:15

OCH 107
No description available.


MUSI 369B - African Drumming and Dance (2)

Michelle Kisliuk

TR 5:15-7:15

OCH 107
This course may be repeated for credit. This is a practical, hands-on course focusing on several music/dance forms from West Africa (Ghana, Togo) and Central Africa (BaAka pygmies and Bagandou farmers), with the intention of performing informally throughout the semester and formally, with guest artists, at the end of the semester.  We will give special attention to developing tight ensemble dynamics, aural musicianship, and a polymetric sensibility.  Concentration, practice, high attention, interaction, and faithful,/prompt attendance are required of each class member.  Each member is also respectfully expected to help prepare the classroom (move chairs, sweep, set up drums/sticks) and to restore the space to classroom style at the end of each meeting.



POLITICS
PLAP 370 - Racial Politics (3)

Prof. Lynn Sanders

TR 11:00 – 11:50

MCL 2014
Examines how attributions of racial difference have shaped American Politics. Topics include how race affects American political partisanship, campaigns and elections, public policy, public opinion, and American political science. Prerequisite: One course in PLAP or instructor permission.


PLAP 382 - Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3)

Prof. David Obrien

MW 1:00 – 1:50

MRY 209
Studies judicial construction and interpretation of civil rights and liberties reflected by Supreme Court decisions. Includes line-drawing between rights and obligations.


PLIR 331 - Ethics and Human Rights in West Africa (3)

Prof. Michael J. Smith

MW 11:00 – 11:50

WIL 402
How do issues of human rights and ethical choice operate in the world of states? Do cosmopolitan ideals now hold greater sway among states than traditional ideas of national interests during the Cold War? Considers ideas of philosophers like Thucydides and Kant in addition to concrete cases and dilemmas taken from contemporary international relations. Specific issues include defining human rights, “humanitarian intervention,” just war theory, and the moral responsibilities of leaders and citizens.


PLIR 424E - Africa: Security and Insecurity (3)

Prof. Flora Jones

M 3:00 – 5:30

CAB 138
No description available.


PLPT 302 - African American Political Thought (3)

Prof. Lawrie Balfour

MW 12:30 – 1:45

CAB 319
This course examines key figures and central concepts in African American political thought from the 19th through the 21st centuries. Issues addressed include the relationship between slavery and American democracy, separation vs. integration, and the promise and limitations of formal equality. Prerequisite: one course in PLPT or instructor permission.


PLCP 581 - Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa (3)

Prof. Robert Fatton

M 1:00 – 2:30

CAN 130
Studies the government and politics of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes the colonial experience and the rise of African nationalism; the transition to independence; the rise and fall of African one-party states; the role of the military in African politics; the politics of ethnicity, nation- and state-building; patromonialism and patron-client relations; development problems faced by African regimes, including relations with external actors; and the political future of Southern Africa.




RELIGIOUS STUDIES
RELA 341 - Witchcraft, Healing, and Popular Religion in Africa (3)

Prof. Amy Nichols-Belo

M 3:30 – 6:15

CAU 112
This course seeks to examine contemporary religious beliefs and practices in a variety of cultural settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Through ethnographic texts, documentaries, and feature films, we will investigate healing practices, current ideas about witchcraft and magic, as well as popular religious expression in Islamic and Christian practice. We will focus on the connections of post-colonial politics, HIV/AIDS, and economic marginalization to religious belief and practice. Since this course is a 300-level seminar, students will be expected to actively prepare for and participate in class discussions, present texts in-class, and write a 12-15 page research paper. Additional course requirements include two quizzes and a final examination.


RELA 410 - Yoruba Religions (3)

Prof. Benjamin Ray

TR 9:30 – 10:45

CAB 312
Studies Yoruba traditional religion, ritual art, independent churches, and religious themes in contemporary literature in Africa and the Americas.


RELC 323 – Pentacostalism (3)

Prof. Valerie Cooper

T 3:30 – 6:00

CAB 332
This course will study the history, practices, theology, and praxis of Pentecostalism, the fastest growing Christian movement in the world, from its origins among poor whites and recently freed African Americans to its phenomenal expansion in places like South America, Asia and Africa. The course will explore Pentecostalism’s theological and historical relationship to the Holiness, Apostolic, and Charismatic movements, as well as Pentecostal belief in phenomena like speaking in tongues, healing, miracles, and prophecy. Finally, the course will use race, class, and gender analysis to evaluate the cultural influences of Pentecostalism in the US and elsewhere in the world.




SOCIOLOGY
SOC 222 - Contemporary Social Problems (3)

Prof. Matthew Hughey

TR 11:00 – 12:15

WIL 301
An analysis of the causes and consequences of current social problems in the United States: Race and ethnic relations, poverty, crime and delinquency, the environment, drugs, and problems of educational institutions.


SOC 410 - African-American Communities (3)

Prof. M. Rick Turner

TR 3:30 – 4:45

CAB 320
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a clear more comprehensive understanding of the history, struggle and diversity of the African-American community. Emphasis will be placed on salient contemporary public issues as well as on the historical role of the African-American community within urban society and on the need for students to obtain knowledge of their cultural history. the course will approach these topics from a framework of analysis with consideration for African-American people's sociological and historical relationship to the political and economic system in America. By means of discussions, lectures, videos, readings and class presentation as well as written assignments, this course will provide new insights and perspectives into the dynamic of the African-American community.




SPANISH, ITALIAN, AND PORTUGUESE
POTR 427 - Afro-Brazilian Civilization (3)

Prof. David Haberly

MWF 11:00 – 11:50

CAB 424
A general introduction, in English, to the literature and culture of Brazil from 1500 to the present, with special emphasis upon the role of Afro-Brazilians in the creation of that literature and culture. No knowledge of Portuguese is required, and lectures and readings will be in English. The course includes discussions of the nation's social and historical development, but these topics will be presented through readings in the major works of Brazilian literature, including the works of important Afro-Brazilian authors.


SPAN 419 - Critical Race Theory (3)

Prof. Ruth Hill



TR 9:30 – 10:45

CAB 319
This course is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate students and graduate students to critical race theory (crt) as an offshoot of critical legal studies (cls), which coined the term “critical race theory,” and as a broader, interdisciplinary body of scholarship and commentary on race and its intersections with gender, class, religion and sexuality. All readings and discussion will be in English. *Enrollment instructor permission only managed through electronic waiting lists. Prerequisites for Spanish majors and minors: 311 and 330; for all others: at least two courses completed in a social science or an interdisciplinary program such as American Studies or African-American Studies. Only distinguished majors and graduate students may enroll in 591.*


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