Advisement • Individual Advising



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HISTORY REGISTRATION – FALL 2015

Information you need for registration

Advisement

Individual Advising - Students are strongly advised to meet with faculty advisors before registering. Please e-mail your advisor to arrange a meeting. If you are unsure who your advisor is, open your student account in PAWS and check the right-hand column under ADVISOR. If you have not been assigned a History Department faculty advisor, please contact the History Department at history@tcnj.edu or ext. 2341.



Before meeting with your advisor:

· Please review your Academic Requirements Report closely with your History Department advisor. Please contact the History Department office and/or your advisor with any discrepancies. Do NOT take your concerns to Records and Registration.

· You may also visit the department website to download and print paper planners and/or advising documents: history.pages.tcnj.edu/program-information/academic-programs.

· Select several courses and add them to your shopping cart on PAWS. · For the meeting, print and bring with you:

· Your Academic Requirements Report from PAWS

· An updated program planner or advising document from the department website · Your unofficial transcript from PAWS



You have many opportunities available to you during your academic career at TCNJ, including minors, double majors, concentrations, study abroad experiences, and internships. Ask your advisor for assistance with mapping out your academic career!


  • Academic Holds – If you have an academic hold on your account, you cannot register for any courses until you meet with your advisor. All first-year students and incoming transfer students have holds. Only your academic advisor can lift advising holds. You may also have a hold on your account for health, housing or finances, which cannot be lifted by your advisor.




  • Additional Resources:

School of Humanities and Social Science - hss.pages.tcnj.edu/resources-for/advising-resources/ History Department - history.pages.tcnj.edu

FALL 2015 COURSE OFFERINGS

All HIS courses fulfill Social Change in Historical Perspective. Review the course listings for additional liberal learning component of Civic Responsibilities.

HIS 100-level Gateway Courses
Fall 2015

Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal Learning

HIS108-01

80526

Late Antiquity

Chiekova

MR

12:30-1:50 pm







Global

HIS 109-01

80527

Ancient Egypt and Neighbors

Goldman

MR

11:00am-12:20 pm

--

--

Global


HIS117-01

82247

Early Modern Europe- British History

Buehner

TF

9:30-10:50am







Global

HIS 130-01

42189

Topics in Asia/Eurasia/Mid. East: Early Japan

Rice

TF

8:00-9:20 am

--

--

Global

HIS149-01

80549

Russian Film

Jens

T

5:30-8:20







Global

HIS161-01

80539

History of Mexico

Crider

MR

8:00-9:20am







Global

HIS 165-01

80530

Topics in North America/US: Vietnam War

Zvalaren

T/Th

5:30-6:50 pm

--

--

Global


HIS 165-02

80531

American Constitutional History

Buehner

TF

5:30-8:20 pm

--

--

Global

HIS 165-03

82242

Topics in North America/ US: Disease & Health in American History

Finger

TF

2:00-3:20pm


--

--

Global

HIS168-01

82246

America’s Moving Frontier

Crider

MR

11:00am-12:20pm







Global

HIS 169-01

80532

Colonial America

Chesney

MR

8:00-9:20am

--

--

Global

HIS173-01

80533

19th Century US

Holland

TF

9:30-10:50am







Global

HIS 177-01

82243

20th Century US

Zvalaren

T/Th

7:00-8:20 pm

--

--

Global

HIS 179-01

80534

African Americans to 1865

Audain

MR

12:30-1:50pm

--

--

Race & Ethnicity

HIS179-02

80535

African Americans to 1865

Audain

MR

9:30-10:50am







Race & Ethnicity

HIS 180-01

80551

African Americans 1865- Present

McAllister

M

5:30-8:20pm

--

--

Race & Ethnicity

HIS 181-01

80548

American Culture

Chesney

MR

9:30-10:50am

--

--

Race & Ethnicity

HIS 184-01

82245

Urban America

Holland

TF

8:00-9:20 am

--

--

--

HIS 190-01

80537

US Race Relations

Fisher

TF

11:00am-12:20pm

--

--

Race & Ethnicity

HIS190-02

82340

US Race Relactions

Fisher

TF

2:00-3:20pm







Race & Ethnicity



HIS 100-level Topic Course Descriptions
HIS 130-03: Topics in Asian History: Early Japan- Jeff Rice

This course will cover Japanese history and culture from the earliest archaeological evidence until the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate (1600-1868). Topics covered will include the rise of the imperial court and aristocratic families, contact and exchange with China and Korea, the spread and development of Buddhism, and the emergence of the samurai. Primary sources will include historical, political, religious and literary texts from the Japanese tradition in English translation.


HIS165-02 Topics in U.S. History: American Constitutional History- Dr. Henry Buehner
HIS 165-01: Topics in U.S. History: Vietnam War- Dr. Michael Zvalaren

This course will cover the Vietnam War from 1945 to 1975, beginning with the French occupation following World War Two and concluding with the final phase in 1975 and the war’s aftermath in the American consciousness. The reading material will cover a broad spectrum, from autobiography to journalism to fiction. Particular attention will be paid to the socioeconomic status of the soldiers, the political climate in the United States during the era, and the cultural texts produced about the war. This course will seek to enhance the understanding and appreciation of students for one of the more contentious moments in American history.


HIS 165-03: Topics in U.S. History: Disease & Health in American History- Simon Finger

This course will explore changing American understandings of what it means to be healthy or sick, and how the quest to promote healthiness and avoid disease shaped American history and culture from the colonial era to the 21st century. Using a variety of sources and an interdisciplinary approach, we will examine the relationship of health and environment, disease outbreaks and the responses to them, and battles over health policy. Topics will include the role of disease in American aboriginal depopulation, the catastrophic outbreaks of Yellow Fever and Cholera in the Early Republic, the doctor-patient relationship, the role of medicine in sustaining slavery, movements for dietary and health reform, the effects of urbanization on American health, debates over quarantine and immigration policy, and the role of the media in spreading information and misinformation about preserving health.



HIS 200-level Foundations Courses

Spring 2015

Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning

HIS 210-01

82248

The Craft of History

Weinstein

TF

9:30-10:50am

--

--

--

HIS210-02

82249

The Craft of History

Weinstein

TF

11:00am-12:20pm










HIS210-03

82458

The Craft of History

Goldman

MR

2:00-3:20pm










HIS 220-02

82262

Commodities and Histories in Medieval Eurasia

Kovalev

TF

3:30-4:50pm

--

Yes

--

HIS 220-01

82263

Early World History and Geography

Liu

TF

11:00am-12:20pm

--

Yes

--

HIS 230-01

82465

Themes in World History: The City

Paces

MR

2:00-3:20pm

--

--

--



HIS 200-level Topic Course Descriptions

HIS 220-02: Early World History and Geography: Commodities and Histories in Medieval Eurasia- Dr. Roman Kovalev


HIS 230: Themes in World History: The City- Dr. Cynthia Paces

Since the earliest civilizations, humans have created built environments as centers of housing, commerce, government, and culture. A hallmark of the modern historical era (1500-present) has been the increasing urbanization of the globe. This course will study global history through a series of case studies of major urban centers in North and South America, Asia, Europe and Africa, such as New York, London, Potosi, Johannesburg, and Prague. We will explore various ways urban historians have sought to understand the dynamics of cities from class, race, and gender relations to architecture and city planning models. The course will also incorporate a visit to an exhibit on modern American cities showing at the Princeton University Art Museum in Spring 2015.




HIS 300-level Lecture/Discussion Courses
Spring 2015

Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning


HIS304-01

82272

Roman Empire

Chiekova

MR

9:30-10:50am

Eurasia

Yes

Global/ Race and Ethnicity

HIS325-01

82323

Modern Germany

Stauff

M

4:00-6:50pm

Eurasia




Global

HIS333-01

82273

Scripture in Context

Hlubik

MR

12:30-1:50pm










HIS337-01

82320

20th Century China

Shao

W

5:00-7:50pm

Eurasia




Global

HIS349-01

82269

The Soviet Union 1917-1991

Kovalev

TF

2:00-3:20pm

Eurasia




Global

HIS352-01

82270

Colonial and Modern Africa

Bender

MR

11:00am-12:20pm

Africa




Global/ Race & Ethnicity

HIS 365-01

82313

Topics in North America/US: African American Women’s History




MR

11:00am-12:20pm

North America

--

--

HIS365-02

82535

Topics in North America/US: African American Women’s History




MR

2:00-3:20pm


North America







HIS 365-03

82536

Topics in North America/US: The Early American Republic

Hollander

MR

11:00am-12:20pm

North America

--

--

HIS375-01

82573

The Old South

Audain

W

8:00am-10:50am

North America




Race & Ethnicity

HIS 384-01

80540

Women in the 20th Century

Genter

MR

9:30-10:50 am

North America

--

Gender

HIS 384-02

80547

Women in the 20th Century

Genter

MR

11:00am-12:20 pm

North America

--

Gender

HIS386-01

82271

US Diplomacy in the 20th Century

Fisher

TF

9:30-10:50am

North America

--

--



Spring 2015 – Reading Seminars

Enrollment Note: Some Readings Seminars require faculty consent prior to registration. Please contact the faculty directly to secure a seat in the seminar if consent is required. Consent requirements are noted in descriptions.


Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning


HIS 451-01

82275

China’s Golden Age

Rice

TF

9:30-10:50am

Asia

Yes

Writing Intensive

HIS 453-01

82324

History and Culture of Pamir Mountains

Gross

T

3:30-6:50 pm

Middle East

Yes

Writing Intensive

HIS454-01

80545

Was Stalin Necessary?

Kovalev

TF

11:00am-12:20pm

Eurasia




Writing Intensive

HIS 460-01

80543

The Development of an American Political Culture

Carter

R

3:30-6:20pm

North America

--

Writing Intensive

HIS460-02

82581

American Slavery

Hollander

M

3:30-6:20pm

North America




Writing Intensive

HIS 462-01

82274

Slavery in Antiquity

Goldman

M

5:30-8:20pm

Europe

Yes

Writing Intensive


Readings Seminars Descriptions

HIS 451: Reading Seminar in Early Asian History: China’s Golden Age- Dr. Jeffrey Rice

**NO instructor consent required to register. Please enroll on PAWS on your own.**

In the medieval era when Europe was experiencing the so-called "Dark Ages" after the collapse of the Roman Empire, the Chinese empire underwent a reunification and renaissance that had a profound effect on both Chinese culture and that of its neighbors. Through networks of trade, the Chinese writing system and political institutions spread to the Korean peninsula and the islands of Japan, Buddhism and Indian philosophy were adopted and adapted by the culture of imperial China, and technologies such as printing, paper money, gunpowder and the compass were first invented before spreading westward to the Middle East and later on to Europe. Domestically this era saw the decline of the traditional imperial capitals of Chang'an and Luoyang and the emergence of Beijing from a frontier garrison to the seat of Chinese political power. The goals of this course will be to gain a thorough understanding of the cultural legacy of the Tang and Song dynasties for both China and its neighbors, and to consider the question of how to define "medieval" and "modern" in the context of global history. The course will conclude with Khubilai Khan's conquest of China and its incorporation into the Mongolian empire.
HIS 453: Reading Seminar in Early Middle Eastern History: History and Culture of the Pamir Mountain Range- Dr. Jo-Ann Gross

** Instructor Consent required to register. Please contact the faculty directly to enroll. **

This course offers a unique opportunity to study a little known region of the Islamic world – that of the mountainous region of the Pamir, sometimes referred to as the “Roof of the World”. Haydar Tavakalov, a native of Gorno-Badakhshan in Tajikistan and a musician and ethnomusicologist, will be a visiting faculty member in Fall 2015 and will team-teach this special seminar with Dr. Jo-Ann Gross, a specialist in Central Asian and Middle Eastern History who conducts research in the Pamir. The Pamir region includes present-day Gorno-Badakhshan province in Tajikistan, Badakhshan province in Afghanistan, the Wakhan corridor in Afghanistan, and Gilgit-Baltistan in Pakistan. Using historical sources, music, poetry, art, film, religious texts, the sacred landscape of shrines, photography, oral history, and archaeological and anthropological findings, students will explore developments in the Pamir from the early modern period to the present. Among the themes to be covered are cultural interaction, the relationship between religion, art and everyday experience, religious identity (most Pamiris are members of the minority Muslim faith, Isma’ilism), gender and family, and the impact of colonialism, war, labor migration and environmental change.


HIS454-01: Reading Seminar in Eurasian History: Was Stalin Necessary?- Dr. Roman Kovalev

HIS460-01: Reading Seminar in Modern North American History: The Development of an American Political Culture- Dr. William Carter

This reading seminar will introduce you to the historiography of Colonial and Revolutionary North America, broadly framed to include areas outside of the present-day boundaries of the United States, to about the year 1800. A key organizing idea for the seminar is that the study of Early North America is not US History, nor is it a pre-history of the area the United States eventually would come to occupy. Instead, the creation of the United States during the American Revolution is taken to be a central problem in need of interpretation, and not as an inevitable result of the collision of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans in early modern North America. Topics will include Native Americans and cross-cultural encounters; European colonies and colonialism, including New Spain, New France, and the British Colonies, both Caribbean and Mainland; gender and sexuality; capitalism, class, consumption, and the environment; Africans and slavery; and the American Revolution


HIS 460-02: Reading Seminar in Modern North American History: American Slavery- Dr. Craig Hollander

**NO instructor consent required to register. Please enroll on PAWS on your own.**

This course will cover the history of human bondage in the United States from the Revolutionary period through the Civil War. It will focus on how enslaved Americans struggled to create their own culture and communities in the midst of terrible oppression. The course will also address the similarities and differences between forms of slavery within the "Land of the Free," both geographically and over time.
HIS 462: Reading Seminar in Early European History: Slavery in Antiquity- Dr. Rachael Goldman
This course will offer an overview of ancient Greek and Roman slavery as a political, legal, economic, social, and cultural phenomenon.  The course will address the following topics: definitions of slavery (including chattel slavery, eventually the predominant form of servitude); the sources and numbers of slaves; the slave mode of production and the significance of slavery in the ancient economy; domestic and rural slaves; the treatment of slaves; resistance to slavery and slave revolts; manumission and the position of ex-slaves in Greco-Roman society; the social position of slaves; the family life of slaves; slavery and the law (civil and natural); slaves in literature; ancient and new world slavery compared.


Spring 2015 – Capstone Seminars


Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning


HIS 498-01

80524

Senior Capstone Research Seminar

Shao

W

8:00-10:50am

--

--

Writing Intensive

HIS 498-02

80544

Honors Senior Capstone Research Seminar

Carter

M

3:30-6:20 pm

--

--

Writing Intensive

HIS 498-03

80546

Senior Capstone Research Seminar

Goldman

T

3:30-6:20pm

--

--

Writing Intensive

Fall 2015 – History Education Courses

Note: This course must be completed concurrently with SED 399 and SPE 323.

Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning


HED 390-01

80522

Social Studies Methods

Marino

M/W


5:30-7:25 pm


--

--

--

*HED 390 schedule will vary throughout the semester. Please see PAWS for exact dates and times

Summer 2015

Course Code

Class #

Name

Professor

Days

Time

Regions

Pre-modern

Liberal

Learning


HIS462-01

60624

Topics: Ancient Medieval World: Pompeii

Goldman

M/T/W/Th

Session A



1:00-4:15 pm

--

Yes

--

HIS 165-01

60566

Topics: North America/US: Gendered U.S. History of Food

Nicolosi

Maymester

Abroad

--

--

Global

HIS 190-01

60576

History of Race Relations

Fisher

Maymester

M/T/W/Th


10:00 am-1:15 pm

--

--

Race & Ethnicity

HIS 316

60557

Topics in Modern Europe: Holocaust Study Tour

Paces

May 26- June 18

Abroad

Europe

--

Global

HIS 354-01

60571

Discussion Lecture: South African History

Bender

Maymester

M/T/W/Th


1:00-4:15 pm

Africa

--

Global/Race & Ethnicity

HIS 370-01

60577

US in the World

McGreevey

Maymester

M/T/W/Th


10:00 am- 1:15 pm

North America

--

Global


Summer Topics Course Descriptions

HIS462-: Topics: Ancient/Medieval World: Pompeii- Dr. Rachael Goldman
This course provides an introduction to the ancient Roman city of Pompeii.  Pompeii is one of the best-known sites of the ancient world. This course will provide a survey of the history of the excavation of the site and the city's history. It will also explore how many aspects of the life in the city -- the makeup of the population, the nature of domestic and other spaces, and its political, religious, commercial and cultural life -- can be recreated from primary sources

.
Frequently Asked Questions


1) Order of Courses – Your first course should be HIS 210 Craft of History. If you have not completed this course, you must enroll in this course in this course this spring. If you are taking Craft of History this coming spring, we recommend that you also enroll in a 100-level Gateway course. If you took Craft in the fall, you may take a 100-level Gateway course and a 200-level Foundation course or two 200-level courses. (You do not have to take a 100-level course to complete the major, but if you do, you may only count one toward your major requirement.) Once you have completed Craft of History, we recommend that you enroll in a 100-level Gateway course and a 200-level Foundation course. After you have completed these three courses, you may select from a variety of 200, 300, and 400-level courses. Reading Seminars should be completed one per semester and before you enroll in the senior capstone seminar. The capstone should be your final course or one of your final courses.
2) Number of Courses per Semester – No more than three history courses should be completed per semester. If you are a double major, plan your course work accordingly. If you are a transfer student, you are only permitted to enroll in three history courses per semester if you have a GPA of 3.3 or higher or by special permission from the Department Chair.
3) The History Minor Requirements - Five course units minimum. Three courses must be 300 or 400 level and from three distinct geographical categories: Africa, America, Asia, Eurasia, Europe, Latin America, or Middle East. No more than one course at the 100-level. The 200 level foundational courses are reserved for History majors, though History minors may enroll if space is available. Occasionally a professor may admit a History minor to a Readings Seminar, if space is available.

4) History Requirements for Education Double Majors - Education double majors with a second major in History are required to follow the same requirements in History as History Liberal Arts majors, except that you must take at least one course in US History.


5) Education Course Order for History Secondary Education majors: EFN 299 and SED 224 must be completed prior to the Junior Field Experience (SPE 323, SED 399, and HED 390); however, we do not recommend that EFN 299 and SED 224 be completed in the same semester due to the time constraints of the practicums for each course. EFN 299 and EFN 398 can be taken concurrently. EFN 398 does not need to be completed before JFE. JFE is now offered in both Fall and Spring semesters.
6) Economics Requirement for History Secondary Education Majors – To fulfill the Economics requirement and a History 300-level course with the same course, the History Department offers HIS365-01 Teaching Economics and Economic History biannually. If you cannot enroll in this course, you may enroll in ECO 101, ECO 102, or ECO 210 to fulfill the Economics requirement; however, please note the mathematics prerequisite for ECO 101 and 102.
7) Political Science Requirement for History Secondary Education Majors** - The required course is: POL 110 American Government.
You may substitute one of the following if you are unable to take POL 110:
b) POL 311 Presidency and American Congress

c) POL 315 Parties, Interest Groups, and the Media

d) POL 316 Public Opinion, Voting, and Elections

e) POL 320 Constitutional Law


**This is a change to previous POL requirements for Secondary Education. If you have already taken POL 250 or another acceptable POL course, you are exempt from this change. If you have not taken a POL class yet, please take POL 110. It may take some time for the change in requirement to show on PAWS.




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