Advanced placement united states history



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ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY

Williston-Elko High School

Instructor: Jackie Houde

jhoude@williston.k12.sc.us

(803) 266- 8039

Spring 2015
Spring 2015
I. Course Description and Instructional Goals:

The United States History Advanced Placement course is designed to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Examination and to fulfill the requirements of the state of South Carolina for high school graduation. A score of at least 3 out of 5 on the Advanced Placement test may qualify students for college credit at the institution of their choice. On the AP test the student will be required to read and analyze historical documents and use them in the context of his/her extensive knowledge in the pertinent historical period to construct a coherent, persuasive historical essay. In order to do this well the student must have at his/her command the basic facts, the continuing themes and an overall understanding of the history of the United States. It is therefore essential that the student be committed to working consistently and diligently to develop his/her factual understanding as well as analytical, interpretative, and writing skills. Methods include class and small group discussion, examination of primary sources, lecture, critical reading, research and presentations, and timed essay writing. The goal of this course is to prepare the student for the AP US History Exam in the spring. Through this course, students will be provided with content, practical knowledge of U.S. history, practice in critical thinking activities, and experience in effective writing techniques that will better prepare them for the AP Exam. This course is divided into periods of time and emphasizes themes throughout American history. These themes include the American identity, economic evolution, and American foreign policy. Hard work and dedication will be essential to success in this class.
***Students are also required to take the South Carolina End of the Course Test for U.S. History***
***Please note: At the conclusion of each unit of study students will take a Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay. They also will be given a DBQ (Document-based Question) for either completion as a take home assignment or given time to complete in class. The content of both the Unit Test and the DBQ will reflect our current course study for that unit. A DBQ question must be answered in essay format: students will be given a question along with several primary source documents; their task will be to answer the question based on their knowledge of the time period or event being questioned and the documents provided.
Advanced Placement United States History is a college-level survey course that covers topics from the pre-Columbian period up to the present.

Themes

The following seven themes described in the AP United States History Course and Exam Description are woven throughout each unit of study:

  1. Identity

  2. Work, Exchange, and Technology

  3. Peopling

  4. Politics and Power

  5. America in the World

  6. Environment and Geography

  7. Ideas, beliefs and cultures


II. Resources

Primary Text:
Boyer, The Enduring Vision. Boston, MA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 2011.
Secondary Text:
Henrietta, America’s History. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill, 2005.
Zinn, Howard, A People’s History of the United States: 1492 to Present. New York: Harper Collins, 2003.
Supplementary Readings from (but not limited to):
Bell, James, et al. Eyewitnesses and Others: Readings in American History, Beginnings to 1865, Vol. 1. Austin: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1996
Bell, James, et al. Eyewitnesses and Others: Readings in American History, 1865 to the Present, Vol. 2. Austin: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1996
Clark, Elizabeth A., Advanced Placement: US History, Book 1 – 3. Cleveland: Center for Learning, 2011.
Madaras, Larry, and James M. SoRelle, Taking Sides: Clashing Viewpoints on Controversial Issues in American History. 14th ed. Volume I: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction. McGraw Hill, 2011.
Madaras, Larry, and James M. SoRelle, Taking Sides: Clashing Viewpoints on Controversial Issues in American History. 14th ed. Volume II: Reconstruction to the Present. McGraw Hill, 2011.
McPherson, James, Battle Cry of Freedom. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003.
*as well as various DBQ/Free Response practice books that will be used throughout the course so that students become familiar and comfortable with the process involved in answering these types of questions.
III. Organization of Instruction:

A variety of instructional methods will be used to address the curriculum. Students will be individually responsible for reading the text and supplemental materials. Discussion of reading and evaluation of primary sources will take place in small groups. Lectures, presentation of group decisions and summaries of class activities will involve a general class discussion.
Two types of grades will be counted; preparation grades and unit performance grades.
A. Preparation grades are designed to help the student to master the material. An average of all preparation grades will be counted as 1/2 of the student’s quarter grade.
1. Quizzes will be given as the teacher chooses to encourage students to read and remember their text assignments and may be in either multiple choice or free response form.
2. Article reviews are designed to require students to read and evaluate assigned scholarly articles in order to practice identifying thesis statements and evaluating evidence. Several will be assigned each week from a primary source document reader. Students will be responsible for reading the documents assigned and analyzing them using APPARTS. They will also need to be able to discuss the readings in class.
3. Identifications are designed to provide students with important names and terms for each of the time periods of study. These are to be completed by the end of the unit under study.
4. Presentation and Participation grades will be based on teacher observation of student’s cooperation and interaction in group assignments and are designed to encourage students to be active learners in the class.

B. Unit performance grades are designed to measure how well the student has mastered material and skills essential to success on the Advanced Placement test. An average of all unit performance grades will count ½ of the student’s quarter grade. Unit tests will be given every 1-2 weeks.
1. Multiple choice tests will be given every one to two weeks and will cover two or more chapters. Test questions will equal the difficulty level of the AP test.
2. Document Based Essay/Free Response Essay tests will be administered on the same day as the multiple choice tests. They will be recorded as a separate grade so that students can measure their progress on these different skills. Questions are taken from past AP tests.
IV. Course Objectives — Students will:

_ master a broad body of historical knowledge

_ demonstrate an understanding of historical chronology

_ use historical data to support an argument or position

_ differentiate between historiographical schools of thought

_ interpret and apply data from original documents, including

cartoons, graphs, letters, maps, works of art, etc.

_ effectively use analytical skills of evaluation, cause and effect,

compare and contrast

_ work effectively with others to produce products and solve problems

_ prepare for and successfully pass the Advanced Placement Exam

Blue Reader” = Eyewitnesses and Others: Readings in American History, Beginnings to 1865, Vol. 1.


Red Reader” = Eyewitnesses and Others: Readings in American History, 1865 to the Present, Vol. 2.
V. Course Outline — Quarter 1
Unit One:
Period 1: Colonial History 1491 – 1607 (1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Primary Text, Chapters 1-2

Zinn, Chapters 1

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #1 & #2 APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 3 “Was Disease the Key Factor in the Depopulation of Native Americans in the Americas?”

2. Maps: New Spain in the 16th Century & Native North Americans 1500

3. Visual: Analyze Columbus artifacts http://www.newswise.com/articles/artifacts-documents-reveal-info-about-those-columbus-met-in-cuba

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyzing the impact of Spanish Exploration on the Americas to include a cause and effect argument. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge - to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Working in groups students develop a class presentation that analyzes the causes and effects of European exploration on Native peoples and European Society.

7. In response to the following prompt, students will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence: Analyze and evaluate the impact of the Columbian Exchange on the Native American population.
Period 2: Colonial History 1607 – 1754 (1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Primary Text, Chapters 3-4

Zinn, Chapters 2,3

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #4 & #5 APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 4 “Was the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria Caused by a Fear of Women?”

2. Maps: New England Colonies in the 17th Century, The Chesapeake Colonies in the 17th Century, American Colonies at the end of the 17th Century, Atlantic Trade in the 18th Century

3. Visual: Analyze Slave artifacts http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/slav/hd_slav.htm

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events – to include the evolution of self-government in each of the colonies.

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyzing the reasons for the development of different economic & social institutions between the different colonial regions. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge - to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. In response to the following prompt, students will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence: Explain and compare the social, political, and economic growth in each of the colonial regions.
Themes:

1. The emergence of American cultural traits and the factors that contributed to them.

2. Emerging regional patterns and how they evolved.

3. Religious diversity in the colonies.
Content:

1. Motives and methods of colonization: Spain, France, Britain

Push-pull factors bringing colonists to the New World

Comparison and contrast of Southern, Middle and New England political,

economic, social, and religious patterns

Cultural differences between Americans and Europeans

contributed to them.

2. Emerging regional patterns and how they evolved.
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Colonial History
Unit 2:
Period 3: Independence and Beginnings of the US 1754 - 1800(1 Week)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 5-7

Zinn, Chapters 4,5

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #21, #22, #25, #26 - APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 6 “Was the American Revolution Largely a Product Market Driven Consumer Forces?”

2. Maps: North America Before & After the French and Indian War, War in the North, Loyalist Strength and Rebel Support

3. Visual: Analyze Revolution artifacts http://www.historyisfun.org/yorktown-victory-center/new-yorktown-museum/museum-artifacts/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyzing the impact of the French on the American Revolution to include a cause and effect argument. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge - to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Students will analyze and listen to the following Podcast. They will then respond in an essay format to answer the question “How definitive was this event in shaping early American political theory and why?”

http://www.theihs.org/academic/2011/12/27/podcast-the-roots-of-early-american-political-theory
Themes:

1. Colonists reevaluate their relationship with Great Britain and with each

other.

2. The American Revolution as a conservative or a radical movement.

3. The American Revolution’s place in world developments of the time

period.
Content:

Mercantilism — costs and benefits for Britain and colonies

British policy changes, post-1763

Emerging colonial cooperation and decision for independence

Military victory and terms of the Treaty of Paris
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: American Revolution
Period 3: Post-Independence and the Critical Period 1781 – 1800 (1 Week)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 8-10

Zinn, Chapters 6,7

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #28, #29, #30
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 7 “Were the Founding Fathers Democratic Reformers?”

2. Maps: Ratification of the Constitution

3. Visual: Analyze Constitution artifacts http://constitutioncenter.org/experience/exhibitions/main-exhibition/the-story-of-we-the-people

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay comparing and contrasting the effectiveness of the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge - to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Using primary and secondary sources on the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution students will be able to take part in a debate citing the positives and negatives of both, involving themselves in the ratification process.
Themes:

1. Impact of colonial experience on post-independence government

2. Development of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights

3. The emergence of political parties and the factors that divided them

4. The development of sectional specialization and interdependence

5. The conflict between national power and states’ rights
Content:

Government under the Articles of Confederation — Successes and failures

Constitutional Convention

_ Personalities

_ Compromises

_ Controversies

_ Ratification

Hamilton v. Jefferson

British-French conflict and its impact on American politics

_ Trade

_ Diplomacy

_ Alien and Sedition Acts
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Constitution

Unit 3:
Period 4: The Differing Nation 1800 - 1848 (1 1/2 Week)

Readings:Text, Chapters 11, 12, 13.

Zinn, Chapter 8

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #55, #57, #62, #68 - APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 11“Was Antebellum Temperance Reform Motivated Primarily by Religious Moralism?”

2. Maps: Lewis and Clark and the Louisiana Purchase, Missouri Compromise

3. Visual: Analyze Manifest Destiny artifacts http://www.authentichistory.com/1600-1859/2-manifest/index.html

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyzing the effect of the Second Great Awakening on the reform movements of the mid 1800s. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Working in groups students will research one antebellum reform movement and explain in a classroom presentation its cause and effect on society and how these reform movements continue today.
Themes:

1.Slavery and the Old South

2.The Market Revolution

3.The Way West

4. Reform movements

5. Movement to urban centers
Content:

-slave life

-life in the south

-industrial change

-urbanization

-reform

-women’s rights and the abolition movement

-the frontier and the Plains Indians

Politics and expansion

-the Mexican question
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Expansion of the United States
Unit 4:

Period 5: Sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction 1844 - 1877(2 Weeks)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 14,15,16.

Zinn, Chapters 9,10

Blue Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #62, #63 & #65

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #3 & #4
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 14“Was Slavery the Key Issue in the Sectional Conflict Leading to the Civil War?”and Issue 17 “Did Reconstruction Fail as a Result of Racism?”

2. Maps: Cotton Kingdom, Slave Empire & Agriculture Economy of the South & Civil War

3. Visual: Analyze Civil War artifacts http://www.civilwar.si.edu/collections.html

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay comparing and contrasting the effectiveness of the Articles of Confederation with the Constitution. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Students read primary source documents on the Mexican-American War and then engage in a classroom debate on President Polk’s motives for engaging in the war.
Themes:

1. Secession and war

2. Reconstruction issues and plans

3. The struggle for equality

4. Native American relations

5. Sectionalism

6. Slavery and causes of the Civil War
Content:

Slavery as a social and economic institution

The politics of slavery:

_ Missouri Compromise

_ Abolitionists

_ Compromise of 1850

_ Kansas-Nebraska Act and Bleeding Kansas

_ Dred Scott Decision

_ Lincoln-Douglas Debates

_ John Brown’s Raid

_ Election of 1860

Military strategies, strengths and weaknesses, events and outcomes

The home front, North and South

_ mobilizing manpower, finances, public opinion

_ social, economic, and political impact of war

Presidential v. Congressional Reconstruction plans and actions
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Sectionalism & the Civil War
Unit 5:
Period 6: Modern Transformations 1865 – 1914 (1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 17,18,19

Zinn, Chapter 11

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #5, #6, #15, #16, #18, #22
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 3“Were the Late Nineteenth Century Big Businessmen ‘Robber Barons’?” and Issue 5 “Were Late Nineteenth Century Immigrants ‘Uprooted’?”

2. Maps: Westward Expansion

3. Visual: Analyze 19th Century immigrant artifacts http://educators.mysticseaport.org/artifacts/immigrant_stereograph/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyze the economic and social problems created by industrialization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Working in groups, students will research the Populist Party movement and then develop a party platform speech as a Populist Party candidate running for president.
Themes:

1.The southern Agarian Revolt

2.Settling the race issue.

3.Agricultural Expansion in the West

4.Transforming the West

5. Political alignment and corruption in the Gilded Age.

6. Role of government in economic growth and regulation.

7. Social, economic, and political impact of industrialization.
Content:

Homestead Act

Westward Movement and Development

Plains Indians

Native Americans and the US Government

Economic development: The New South?

1877 Compromise and Home Rule

Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois leadership styles and programs

Gilded Age politics

_ Party alignment

_ Political corruption and reform

Industrial growth

Government support and actions

Business tycoons: methods, accomplishments, philosophies

Rise of organized labor

Changing conditions

Unions, leaders, methods, successes and failures

Plains Wars and Reservation Policy

_ Dawes Act

Comparison of reform attitudes towards African-Americans and Native

Americans in late 19th century
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Gilded Age
Mid Term




Quarter 2



Unit 6:
Period 7:Politics and Progressives 1890 - 1916 (1 Week)

Readings: Text, Chapters 20,21.

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #22, 27 & #28 APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 6 “Were the Populists Irrational Reactionaries?” and Issue 8 “Did the Progressives Fail?”

2. Maps: 1896 Election

3. Visual: Analyze 19th Century immigrant artifacts http://educators.mysticseaport.org/artifacts/immigrant_stereograph/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyze the economic and social problems created by industrialization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Students will participate in a classroom debate of the issues presented in “Did the Progressives Fail?” To include 3 main arguments for a pro or con classroom discussion. The con position: Arthur S. Link and Richard L. McCormick, from Progressivism. The pro position: Richard M Abrams, from “The Failure of Progressivism” in The Shaping of the Twentieth Century.
Themes:

1. Inflation/Deflation — Role of government in the economy

2. Role and effectiveness of third parties

3. Immigration and urbanization

4. Patrician reformers

5. Bryan and Wilson: “Jeffersonian goals in Hamiltonian form” (Conflict and

Consensus)

6. Teddy Roosevelt/Taft/Wilson: Conservatives as Progressives (reform to

preserve)
Content:

Agrarian Revolt

_ Post-war problems

_ Attempts to organize

_ Election of 1896

Immigration and urbanization in the late 19th century

Social and cultural developments of the late 19th century

Urban middle-class reformers lead a call for change

_ Muckrakers

_ Women’s issues and roles

_ Political corruption and reforms

_ Consumer and environmental protection

Business and labor issues

Teddy Roosevelt, Taft, and Wilson administrations respond to Progressive

Movement
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Progressivism
Period 7: Imperialism and World War I 1898 - 1920(1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 22,23.

Zinn, Chapter 12,13

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #33, #34 & #45 APPARTS

Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 9 “Was Woodrow Wilson Responsible for the Failure of the United States to Join the League of Nations?”

2. Maps: Spanish-American War; US Imperialism

3. Visual: Analyze WWI artifacts http://www.greatwar.co.uk/article/battle-remains-western-front.htm

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyze the effect of yellow journalism on the Spanish-American War. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.

Themes:

1. The changing role of the U.S. in world affairs — from isolationism to

world power.

2. U.S. motives in World War I and post-war agreements.

3. Presidential and congressional roles in policy management.
Content:

Reasons for new interest in world affairs

Spanish-American War

_ Cuban situation and U.S. reaction

_ Military preparedness and action

_ Treaty provisions

_ Philippine Annexation — debate and results

Open Door Policy

Teddy Roosevelt’s “Big Stick” Diplomacy

_ Roosevelt Corollary and applications

_ Panama intervention and canal building

_ Nobel Peace Prize

Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy

Wilson’s “Moral” or “Missionary” Diplomacy

_ Relations with Panama, Mexico, Haiti, Philippines

_ Neutrality, 1914-1917

_ World War I as a war to “make the world safe for democracy”

Various interpretations of U.S. motives in World War I

World War I at home

_ Economic impact

_ Harassment of German-Americans

_ Women and minorities

_ Espionage and Sedition Acts

_ Business and Labor relations

_ Creel Committee — wartime propaganda

Treaty negotiations and Senate rejection of Versailles Treaty
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Isolationism & WWI
Unit 7:
Period 7: 1920s 1920 - 1929(1 Week)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 24

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #38 & #41 APPARTS
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 10 “Was Prohibition a Failure?”

2. Maps: Dust Bowl; Unemployment

3. Visual: Analyze Great Depression artifacts http://gaukartifact.com/2013/04/15/the-roaring-twenties-1920-1929/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyze the effect of consumerism on American society in the 1920s. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Create a concept map showing the changing society during the 1920s – to include names, facts, chronology and facts.
Themes:

The 1920s:

1. Post-World War I compared to post-Civil War nativism, laissez-faire,

labor government, farmers, attitudes toward reform.

2. U.S. pursuit of “advantages without responsibilities.”

3. Administration policy of “nullification by administration.”

4. Cultural conflicts: native v. foreign; rural v. urban.

5. Revolution in manners and morals.

6. Consumerism

Content:

_ The 1920s: Post-war recession and agricultural problems

_ Intolerance

_ KKK

_ Immigration restriction

_ Sacco and Vanzetti

_Prohibition and Organized Crime

_Jazz Age culture, Youth Rebellion, Literature of Disillusionment

_Business growth and consolidation, credit, advertising

_Harding, Coolidge, Hoover administrations

_ Scandals

_ Trickle-down Economics

_ “Business of America is Business”

_ Boom and Bust In the Stock Market

_ Foreign Policy

Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Post WWI Recession

Period 7: The Great Depression 1929 - 1941 (1 Week)

Readings:

Text, Chapter 25

Zinn, Chapter 15

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #41, #45 & #47 APPARTS


Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 10 “Did the New Deal Prolong the Great Depression?”

2. Maps: US Demographic; Consumerism

3. Visual: Analyze Great Depression artifacts http://historyexplorer.si.edu/artifacts/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay analyze the effect of FDR’s New Deal programs. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. The students will read and research primary and secondary source documents on the Great Depression and then participate in a classroom debate arguing the effectiveness of the New Deal on the Great Depression.
Themes:

The 1930s:

1. The role of government in society and the economy.

2. Political realignment.

3. Human suffering and response to the Great Depression.
Content:

The 1930s:

_ Hoover v. Roosevelt’s approaches to the Depression

_ New Deal Legislation — Effectiveness and Criticisms

_ Supreme Court Reactions and Court Packing Plan

_ Dust Bowl and Demographic Shifts

_ Extremist alternatives: Coughlin, Long, Townsend

_ Political Party Alignment — the new Democratic Coalition

_ Impact of the Great Depression on various population groups
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Assignment: Governments Role in society & the economy
Period 7: World War II 1941 – 1947 (1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 26.

Zinn, Chapter 16

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #50, #56 & #57

Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 12 “Did President Roosevelt Deliberately Withhold Information About the Attack on Pearl Harbor from the American Commanders?”

2. Maps: War in Europe; War in the Pacific

3. Visual: Analyze WWII artifacts http://historyexplorer.si.edu/artifacts/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay. Analyze the causes for US involvement in WWII, including a comparison of US involvement in WWI and WWII. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Create a concept map key events during WWII as they are related to the United States – to include names, facts, chronology and facts.
Themes:

1. Comparison of Wilson and Roosevelt as neutrals, wartime leaders, Allied

partners, post-war planners.

2. U.S. adopts new role as peacetime leader in post-war world.

3. Home front conduct during World War I and World War II.
Content:

U.S. response to aggression — neutrality legislation, Lend-Lease Act

Pearl Harbor and U.S. response

Military Strategy

_ Germany First

_ Second Front Debate

_ Island Hopping

_ Atomic Bomb

Home Front

_ Relocation of Japanese-Americans

_ Women and Minorities In the Workplace

_ Demographic Impact

Wartime Diplomacy and Cooperation

_ Atlantic Charter (Compare to Fourteen Points)

_ Wartime Conferences

_ United Nations Founding and Participation

Splintering of Wartime Alliance and Adoption of Containment

_ Berlin and German Division

_ Truman Doctrine

_ Marshall Plan

_ NATO

_ Korea
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: US Home front during WWII
Unit 8:
Period 8: Cold War 1945 – 1980 (1 1/2 Weeks)

Readings:

Text, Chapters 27, 28

Zinn, Chapter 17

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #58, #59, #66 & #74
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 13 “Was President Truman Responsible for the Cold War?”

2. Maps: Europe after WWI;

3. Visual: Analyze Cold War artifacts http://historyexplorer.si.edu/artifacts/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay. Analyze whether or not the Cold War inevitable and was to blame - the United States or the USSR? Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Students will research the role that society and public opinion played in the Vietnam War and write an essay using historical data.
Themes:

1. Continued impact of New Deal in government’s role in society.

2. Struggle for civil liberties and civil rights.

3. Checks and balances at work in American politics.
Content:

Truman’s Administration

_ Fair Deal

_ GI Bill of Rights

_ Taft-Hartley Act

_ 22nd Amendment

_ 1948 Election

_ Loyalty Program

Eisenhower’s Administration

_ McCarthyism

_ Modern Republicanism

_ Highway Construction

_ Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka

_ Earl Warren Court
Kennedy/Johnson Administrations

_ Civil Rights Movement: Popular and Government Response

_ War on Poverty and Great Society Programs

_ Counterculture and Anti-establishment Movements
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Struggle for civil rights & civil liberties
Period 8: The 60’s (1 Week)
Readings:

Text, Chapters 29

Zinn, Chapter 18

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #84 & #85
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 15 “Did President John F. Kennedy Demonstrate a Strong Commitment to Civil Rights?”

2. Maps: Racial Tensions in the US

3. Visual: Analyze Civil Rights artifacts http://historyexplorer.si.edu/artifacts/

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay. Analyze the social unrest that was created in The US as a result of the US involvement in Vietnam. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Using at least 2 scholarly articles (using sources outside of our regular classroom texts) students must research the topic: Was increased involvement in Vietnam necessary to maintain US foreign policy goals? Be prepared to debate topic in class to include the cause of specific actions taken by the US and the effect of those actions.

7. Using classroom resources, including primary and secondary sources, students will debate the extent to which there is both change and continuity of civil rights going back to the Declaration of Independence up to Civil Rights Movement and the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Themes:

1. Cycles of freezes and thaws in East-West relations.

2. The “Vietnam Syndrome” in post-war foreign policy.

3. Human rights v. strategic self-interest in policy formulation.

4. Interrelationship of foreign policy and economic stability.
Content:

Eisenhower

Liberation, not containment

_ John Foster Dulles

_ Massive retaliation

Asia Policies:

_ Korea

_ Southeast Asia — Geneva Accords and aid to South Vietnam

Peaceful Co-existence — Khrushchev’s visit

U-2 Incident

Kennedy:

_ Flexible Response

_ Aid for Social and Economic Development

_ Peace Corps

_ Alliance for Progress

_ Southeast Asia military and economic aid

_ Bay of Pigs and Cuban Missile Crisis

Johnson:

_ Vietnam War

_ Civil Rights Act 1964 & Voting Rights Act 1965
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing topic: Vietnam War
Period 9: Reagan Revolution to the New Century 1980 to present (1 Week)

Readings: Text Chapters 30 and 31.

Zinn, Chapter 20, 21

Red Reader (Primary Source Documents) - #74 & #79
Activities:

Document Comparison and Analysis – Purpose, Historical Context, Intended Audience, Author’s Point of View (PHIA)

Students will use PHIA to analyze the sources below in a take home writing assignment.
1. Documents: Taking Sides. Issue 18 “Is the United States a Declining Power?”

2. Maps: Election Maps 1980 and 1992

3. Visual: Analyze Post Cold War artifacts http://www.greatwar.co.uk/article/battle-remains-western-front.htm

4. Data: Annotated Timeline of key events

5. Writing: 5 paragraph essay. Analyze the successes and failures of President Bill Clinton in both domestic and foreign policy. Students will create a historical argument with a thesis statement supported by historical fact. Students will apply detailed and specific knowledge – to include names, chronology, facts and events.
6. Students will create a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the presidencies of Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush and Obama to include major legislation, domestic and foreign policies.
7. Students will read the following articles concerning the Keystone Pipeline, then construct an argument for or against it to be debated in the classroom. http://www.labor4sustainability.org/articles/5-reasons-why-the-keystone-pipeline-is-bad-for-the-economy/

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/19/us/politics/what-does-the-proposed-keystone-xl-pipeline-entail.html?_r=0

http://alternativeenergy.procon.org/view.answers.php?questionID=001628
Topics:

Nixon/Ford:

_ Vietnamization

_ Nixon Doctrine

_ China Card

_ Detente

Carter:

_ Human Rights Policies

_ Camp David Accords

_ Panama Canal Treaties

_ SALT II, Afghanistan, and Olympic Boycott

_ Iran Revolution and Hostage Crisis

Reagan:

_ “The Evil Empire”

_ Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI)

_ End of the Cold War

Bush:

-2nd Cold War

-Sunbelt

-The New Economy

-The New Century

Clinton:

_NAFTA

_Family and Medical Leave

_Earned Income Credit

_Health care reform

George W. Bush:

_9/11

Obama:

_Healthcare Reform
Conclusion of unit:

Unit Test with 50 multiple choice questions & one free response essay

DBQ: Students will be given a prompt upon which they will use provided documents and their knowledge of the time period to write an essay with a thesis statement supported by historical evidence.

Writing Topic: Post Cold War
Final: EOC and AP Exam
***NOTE: Times given for each unit of study are approximate and subject to change****

**********Recurring assignments**********

1. Readings from the Red or Blue Reader(Primary Source Documents): students must complete APPARTS (worksheet given) and come to class prepared to discuss the primary documents assigned

2. Readings from the Zinn book: students must come to class with two discussion questions and be prepared to discuss the assigned reading

3. Readings from text: students must complete a timeline and assigned identifications

4. Unit Tests: Every unit test will have a free response essay question and a DBQ component. Unit tests are every 1-2weeks depending on the length of the unit being tested.

5. Use your syllabus to manage your assignments. Every Monday I will post on the board the due dates for all of our assignments for the week and the following week.

6. Please take note that if you have a reading assignment you also have a written assignment. Refer to items 1,2,3, and 4 from this list.
***It’s important that you keep up with the readings & the assignments. This is a college class so no late work will be accepted. Absolutely NONE – Do NOT ask!


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