Advanced Placement Modern European History



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Advanced Placement Modern European History

410-674-6500 X231


Ms. Pugh, Room F202 Mr. Yuscavage, F101

spugh@aacps.org myuscavage@aacps.org

www.mspugh.net (copies of handouts) www.schoolnotes.com
Course Description:

AP European History is designed to be a college-level survey course similar to a western civilization course found at most colleges and universities. The purpose of this course is to continue the examination of the period of European history from 1450 through the early 21st century. The course will focus on the social, political, religious, intellectual, cultural, technological, and economic developments throughout this period of history. Without this knowledge, students will lack the context for understanding the development of contemporary institutions, the role of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, and the evolution of current forms of artistic expression and intellectual discourse. There will be an emphasis on social studies skills including visual (maps, graphs, and charts) analysis, analytical reading, and analytical writing.


Students may use AP European History to meet his/her Maryland graduation requirement in world history or as an elective credit. Although there are not any prerequisites for this course, students should be aware that this course will require more time and effort than the regular or honors world history courses and students should be willing to adjust his/her schedules to accommodate the increased demands found in this AP course. All students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam.
Instructional Philosophy:

Students will be actively engaged in challenging and appropriate activities that will help build his/her understanding of European history and social studies skills. During class students will participate in a variety of learning activities including interactive note-taking, class discussions, document analysis, debates, simulations, essay writing, and cooperative learning. For homework, students will assume the responsibility for completing reading and writing assignments that will reinforce course material and skills. Students will be expected to use the Internet to conduct historical research and will be required to complete some assignments using technology and computer software, such as word processing and PowerPoint.


Course Standards and Outcomes

In order to successfully complete this course, students are expected to master the standards that are outlined in the College Board’s AP European History Course Description. The description booklet is available at www.collegeboard.com. Students will be expected to:



  1. Become familiar with significant eras, persons, and events in European history.

  2. Identify major artistic eras and themes and relate them to the appropriate historical context.

  3. Read, interpret, and analyze a wide variety of primary and secondary sources.

  4. Develop critical thinking and writing skills.

  5. Conduct historical research.

  6. Use historical data to support an argument or position.

  7. Prepare oral presentations over a variety of historical topics.

  8. Write AP-quality essays.

  9. Apply mathematical and other analytical skills to interpret maps, graphs, and charts.

  10. Identify and analyze bias and point of view.


Course Themes:

The College Board has designed the AP European History course so that is addresses a variety of historical themes. These themes are:



  1. Intellectual and Cultural History

    • Changes in religious thought and institutions

    • Secularization of learning and culture

    • Scientific and technological developments and their consequences

    • Major trends in literature and the arts

    • Intellectual and cultural developments and their relationship to social values and political events

    • Developments in social, economic, and political thought

    • Developments in literacy, education, and communication

    • The diffusion of new intellectual concepts among different social groups

    • Changes in elite and popular culture, such as the development of new attitudes toward religion, the family, work, and ritual

    • Impact of global expansion on European culture

  2. Political and Diplomatic History

    • The rise and functioning of the modern state in its various forms

    • Relations between Europe and other parts of the world: colonialism, imperialism, decolonization, and global interdependence

    • The evolution of political elites and the development of political parties, ideologies, and other forms of mass politics

    • The extension and limitation of rights and liberties (personal, civic, economic, and political); majority and minority political persecutions

    • The growth and changing forms of nationalism

    • Forms of political protest, reform, and revolution

    • Relationships between domestic and foreign policies

    • Efforts to restrain conflict: treaties, balance-of-power diplomacy, and international organizations

    • War and civil conflict: origins, developments, technology, and their consequences

  3. Social and Economic History

    • The character of and changes in agricultural production and organization

    • The role of urbanization in transforming cultural values and social relationships

    • The shift in social structures from hierarchical orders to modern social classes: the changing distribution of wealth and poverty

    • The influence of sanitation and health care practices on society; food supply, diet, famine, disease, and their impact

    • The development of commercial practices, patterns of mass production and consumption, and their economic and social impact

    • Changing definitions of and attitudes toward mainstream groups and groups characterized as the "other"

    • The origins, development, and consequences of industrialization

    • Changes in the demographic structure and reproductive patterns of Europeans: causes and consequences

    • Gender roles and their influence on work, social structure, family structure, and interest group formation

    • The growth of competition and interdependence in national and world markets

    • Private and state roles in economic activity

    • Development and transformation of racial and ethnic group identities


Required Textbook:

McKay, John P., Bennett D. Hill, and John Buckler. A History of Western Society: Since 1300. 7th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.


Other Readings and Research Tools Available to Students:

Throughout the semester, students will be required to participate in individual readings and research. In order to assist with this process, the school provides online access to a variety of research and college-level databases. User names and passwords are available in class or from the school media center. You may use the teacher’s website to directly link to each of these databases. These databases include:




  • ABC-CLIO World History

  • EBSCO Advanced Placement Source

  • EBSCO Host Web

  • EBSCO Religion and Philosophy Collection

  • Pro-Quest Historical Newspapers

  • SIRS Database

  • Thomson Gale Resource Center – History Resource Center: World


Required Materials:

Students are expected to provide their own materials for class. Students are required to have:



  • Notebook with dividers

  • Notebook paper that is replenished on a regular basis

  • Blue or black ink pens

  • #2 pencils


Course Outline and Major Assignments:


Unit/Timeframe

Textbook Readings; Visual Activities

Selected Primary Documents and Other Readings

French Revolution & Napoleon
3rd Quarter

Chapter 21
Maps – Role of Geography in History

Romantic Art



Declaration of the Rights of Man

What is the Third Estate?

Reflections on the Revolution in France



Industrial Revolution and Economic Developments
3rd Quarter

Chapters 22 & 24
Images of the Industrial Revolution

Inquiry into the Condition of the Poor

Reflections from the workers during the Industrial Revolution



Ideologies and Revolutions

3rd Quarter



Chapters 23 & 25
Economic data analysis

Carlsbad Decrees

Blood and Iron Speech

On Liberty

Communist Manifesto

What is Property?



Imperialism

3rd Quarter



Chapter 26
African artwork

White Man’s Burden

The Black Man’s Burden

Social Darwinism


World War I
3rd Quarter

Chapter 27
Slides of Trench Warfare

All’s Quiet on the Western Front

14 Points

Interwar Years
4th Quarter

Chapter 29
Art of the Early 20th Century



League of Nations Charter

Kellogg Pact

The Doctrine of Fascism

Appeasement Defended

World War II
4th Quarter

Chapter 29
Compare American and Soviet World War II Propaganda Posters

Night

Excerpts from Conferences (Potsdam, Tehran, etc.)

Atlantic Conference


Cold War
4th Quarter

Chapter 30

Iron Curtain Speech

Containing the Soviet Union

New Europe
4th Quarter

Chapter 31

Document packet dealing with the growth of the European Union

Putting Europe Together
4th Quarter

Research Project

Research Project


Research Project:

All students will complete a research project each semester. This project will be assigned following the AP exam in May. A brief description of the research project and the rubric that will be used to grade the project follows.


AP Euro Mid-Year Project In--brief
Directions:

Students will rewrite the Billy Joel song We Didn’t Start the Fire to create a timeline of major events, phenomena, people, places, references, and fads from his/her lifetime.


  1. You need to mention sixty (60) events, phenomena, people, places, references, fads. etc. from your time period - from the date of your birth to the time this is due.

  2. You don’t need to rhyme anything, but have some type of flow. Don’t just write a list out. Make it at least look like a lyric sheet to a song.

  3. You are changing the verses, not the chorus. Leave the “we didn’t start the fire…”stuff alone.

  4. Have three verses with roughly twenty items, then the chorus, then repeat. You need three verses and three choruses.

  5. The items should be in a general chronological order.

  6. You need to mention:

  1. Fifteen (15) European history events – highlighted with a key

  2. Ten (10) American history events – highlighted with a key

  3. Ten (10) World events (non-European and non-American) – highlighted with a key

  4. At least 25 other events. These are up to you

  5. You need to supply visuals for at least 6 of the events. Add them to the lyrics page or have them on a separate page


AP European History Semester Two Project Grading Rubric

The project is worth 100 points and will be graded using the following rubric.




European Historical Events

14-20 points
Lyric sheet contains fifteen items relevant to European history during the lifespan of the student. Items are color coded.

7-13 points
Lyric sheet may be missing one or several items relevant to European history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

0-12 points
Lyric sheet missing less than half of required number of items relevant to European history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

American History Events

14-20 points
Lyric sheet contains fifteen items relevant to American history during the lifespan of the student. Items are color coded.

7-13 points
Lyric sheet may be missing one or several items relevant to American history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

0-12 points
Lyric sheet missing less than half of required number of items relevant to American history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

World Events

14-20 points
Lyric sheet contains fifteen items relevant to World (non-American and non-European) history during the lifespan of the student. Items are color coded.

7-13 points
Lyric sheet may be missing one or several items relevant to World (non-American and non-European) history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

0-12 points
Lyric sheet missing less than half of required number of items relevant to World (non-American and non-European) history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.


Other Events

14-20 points
Lyric sheet contains fifteen items relevant to world history during the lifespan of the student. Items are color coded.

7-13 points
Lyric sheet may be missing one or several items relevant to world history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.

0-12 points
Lyric sheet missing less than half of required number of items relevant to world history during the lifespan of the student. Items may not be color coded.


Major visuals

11-15 points

At least sex major visuals are present; visuals are relevant to project information



6-10 points

At least one visual is missing; visuals may not be relevant to project information



0-5 points

Pamphlet lacks visuals; visuals are not relevant to project information



Neatness and format

4-5 points
Project follows directions clearly in regard to format

2-3 points
Project somewhat reflects format in directions

0-1 points
Project fails to reflect format in directions




Grade Determination:

65% Major Assessments

40% Exams and Projects/Presentations

25% Quizzes

35% Minor Assessments

15% Homework

10% Class work

10% Work Habits


Assessment Descriptions:

  1. Exams – there will be one exam per unit of study. Each exam is modeled after the AP Exam and will include multiple choice and essay sections. Exams are used to assess where students are in meeting the College Board standards for content. Exams will cover material from lectures, classroom discussions, and readings. These questions are challenging and require students to apply critical thinking skills rather than simply to recall facts. Essays are graded with the College Board Rubrics. Successful performance on the exams will demonstrate mastery of course standards.




  1. Projects and Presentations – there will be one major research project that will be completed in December. This project will require students to complete research in the computer lab. Details of this project, including a rubric, are found later in the syllabus. Additionally, students will make at least one class presentation per quarter. Presentations will allow students to demonstrate technology and research skills. Rubrics for each presentation will be distributed when the presentations are assigned.




  1. Quizzes – there will be quizzes over class notes, required reading, vocabulary, and geography. There will be at least one quiz per week. Quizzes will be used to monitor the progress of students in meeting the standards of the course.




  1. Classwork and Homework – there will be weekly assignments that will help students internalize material presented in class and in a variety of readings. Some assignments will require students to use graphic organizers to organize and sort information from class notes and readings. Specific assignments will relate to maps, graphs, and charts and will require students to use mathematical and other analytical skills to interpret historical data. Other assignments will require students to synthesize material through formal written responses. There will be critical reading and writing assignments daily.




  1. Work Habits – work habits will be assessed by the student’s ability to participate in class discussion and other activities, remain on task, and meet the standards as established by the Board Policy and Campus Policy.



Grading Rubrics:

Each assignment and assessment will be graded based on College Board rubrics and standards. There are numerous rubrics used on AP assignments. Copies of these rubrics will be distributed in class with corresponding assignments. Copies are also available on the teacher’s website.


In addition to individual assignment and assessment rubrics, students can help track their performance in the class by referring to the following grading rubric.


A (90 – 100%)

Student exceeded expectations and mastered all basic historical content and historiography skills. Student demonstrated strong study habits by normally earning As on exams, quizzes, and written work. Student demonstrated historical knowledge through class discussions and activities. Student ensured that all work was turned in on time and followed the grading rubrics that were distributed with major assignments. Student ensured that work missed during absences was quickly completed and submitted.

B (80 – 89%)

Student met expectations and mastered all basic historical content and historiography skills. Students demonstrated strong study habits by normally earning Bs on exams, quizzes, and other written work. Student demonstrated historical knowledge through some class discussion and activities. Student ensured that almost all work was turned in on time and followed most of the grading rubrics that were distributed with major assignments. Student ensured that work missed during absences was completed and submitted.

C (70-79%)

Student met the majority of expectations concerning historical content and skills. Student might not have fulfilled requirements for the Proficiency Policy or might not have completed missing work from absences. Student averaged scores in the 70s on exams, quizzes, and other written work.

D (60 – 69%)

Student met less than half of the expectations concerning historical content and skills. Students might not have fulfilled requirements for the Proficiency Policy or might not have completed missing work from absences. Student averaged scores in the 60s on exams, quizzes, and other written assignments.

E (below 60)

Student failed to meet course standards. Student failed to fulfill requirements for the Proficiency Policy. Exams, quizzes, and other assignments averaged less than 60%.


Proficiency Policy:

Exams, quizzes, and other assignments are carefully created to help ensure that students can demonstrate mastery of the course standards. When a student fails to demonstrate mastery of the course standards or summative assessments, students will have additional opportunities to meet standards. This policy does not apply to all assignments, only those which are used to demonstrate mastery of standards. In addition, this does not apply to missing or late work. This only applies to assignments and assessments that were submitted on time.


In the case where the teacher determines that an assignment or assessment does not demonstrate mastery of a standard, then the teacher will assign the student to a tutoring session held either after school hours or during the 50-minute “Wildcat Hour” and the student will either complete the assignment during the time allotted or the student will participate in tutoring and then have another opportunity to demonstrate mastery of course standards. Students who fail to attend the tutoring session will not be given another opportunity for the specific assignment.

Late Work:

Students are expected to complete assignments on time – this is a part of Wildcat Pride. Late work will not be accepted under any circumstances other than medical or emergency situations.


Make Up Tests, etc.

It is up to the individual student to obtain and complete makeup work. Students are expected to get copies of class notes from a friend. Some assignments are located online by accessing www.mspugh.net.

If you are absent on the day of a test or quiz, you will take “Version B” of the exam or quiz at 2:00 p.m. on the last day of the week (normally Friday) following your return to school. Failure to come in for a makeup will result in a 0.
If you are absent on the day an assignment is due, you must turn in the assignment on the day you return. If you miss a class work assignment, then you must obtain a copy of the assignment when you return. You will have three days from your return to complete all missing class work and homework assignments.

Student Progress:

Students are encouraged to keep track of their progress in this course. The teacher will provide printed copies of progress reports at least once each three weeks. In addition, parents who return the permission slip for email progress reports can receive them at a more frequent rate.


Attendance Policy:

It is extremely important that students attend school on a regular basis so that they can keep up with their assignments. It should also be noted that school policy dictates that if a student has three unexcused absences from a class he/she will earn a failing grade for that subject during the quarter (also known as a nine week period of time). “Class Xp,” an attendance software program, will be used to track student attendance during the school year and determine if students have developed an attendance concern.


Additional Help:

Students are encouraged to form study groups and to attend teacher-led study sessions. These sessions are announced in class and are held throughout the semester. Some study sessions will focus on upcoming tests while others will focus on essay writing. AP review sessions will be offered throughout the spring semester to help students prepare for the AP Exam and students are also encouraged to make appointments for individual help and tutoring.


Plagiarism Policy:

The Board of Education academic integrity policy defines plagiarism as, “deliberately presenting the ideas or works or statements of another as one’s own, without acknowledgement of the source.” The Board also notes that plagiarism “includes downloading, copying, and/or buying work and submitting it as the student’s own work.” This policy means that “cut and paste” computer operations and copying material from a website are not permissible. Except for short quotations from cited sources, students must write everything in his/her own words. Students turning in work which is a violation of this policy will be referred to their administrator for appropriate disciplinary action and lose credit for the assignments. This policy will be fully enforced at all times. Even students who normally are “good kids” or “work hard” will be punished for this infringement. The policy was written for all Anne Arundel County students and will be consistently enforced.



(DETACH THIS PAGE AND RETURN TO TEACHER)
Please read the following:

  • I have read and understand the requirements for this class, including the grading policy.

  • I also understand the plagiarism policy. It is clear that the plagiarism policy will be vigorously enforced even though my child may normally be an exceptional student or exhibit exemplary character on most occasions.

  • It is also apparent that late homework will not be accepted! This is in an effort to ensure that students are assuming more responsibility in their advancement towards a true college-level experience

  • I also understand that if my student has three or more unexcused absences per quarter than his/her report card grade will reflect the letter “E” regardless of his/her grade in the last. I understand that this is Board policy and the teacher is required to follow it.

  • I understand that all students enrolled in this course are expected to take the AP Exam on May 9, 2008 and that the exam is approximately $85.00. The fee for this exam will be due during the 3rd quarter. The Guidance Office will be in charge of collecting this fee and registering students for this exam.


Student Name (Last, First): ________________________________________________
Parent/Guardian Name: (Last, First) _______________________________________
Relationship to Student: __________________________________________________
Address: Phone Contacts:
Street: __________________________ Home Phone: ___________________
Town: __________________________ Work Phone: ___________________
Zip Code: _______________________ Cell Phone: ____________________
Parent’s Email (please PRINT VERY CLEARLY): ______________________________________________
Student’s Email (please PRINT VERY CLEARLY): _____________________________________________
Please read, select your choice, and sign the following:
____ I grant my child’s AP European History teacher permission to email my child’s grades to me and my child. I understand that email is not a secure system and others could access email accounts and view my child’s grades.
____ I do not grant permission to email my child’s grades.

___________________________________ ___________________________

Parent Signature Date

___________________________________ ___________________________

Student Signature Date
Optional Information:
If there is anything critical that you feel that I should know about your student in or out of school?

Are there any particular strengths or weaknesses that you feel your student will demonstrate in this class?




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