Academic Positions



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Daniel Kapust

Associate Professor

Department of Political Science

University of Wisconsin-Madison

311 North Hall, 1050 Bascom Mall

Madison, WI 53706

djkapust@wisc.edu

608-263-9429


Academic Positions:
Fall 2012-present: Associate Professor. Department of Political Science. University of

Wisconsin-Madison.

Faculty Affiliate: Center for Early Modern Studies, Department of Classical and
Ancient Near Eastern Studies.

Fall 2011-Spring 2012: Assistant Professor. Department of Political Science. University

of Wisconsin-Madison.

Fall 2005 to Spring 2011: Assistant Professor. Department of Political Science. The


University of Georgia. Promoted and tenured to Associate Professor, Spring 2011. Faculty in residence at UGA School of Public and International Affairs Oxford Study Abroad Program, Spring 2011.

Fall 2010: Visiting Assistant Professor. Department of Politics. Fairfield University.




Education:

M.A./Ph. D. Political Science, University of Wisconsin, Madison. 2001/2005. Dissertation: Rereading Republicans: Roman History and Liberal Dilemmas.

B.A. Cum Laude, Classical Languages and Literature. 1998. B.A. Cum Laude, High Departmental Honors, Government and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park, 1998.


Publications (Peer Reviewed):


1. “The Rhetoric of a Legislator: Cicero and Smith on Propriety, Decorum, and Political Leadership.” Co-authored with Michelle Schwarze. Accepted for publication by the American Political Science Review.
2. “Democratical Gentlemen and the Lust for Mastery: Status, Ambition, and the
Language of Liberty in Hobbes’s Political Thought.” Co-authored with Brandon P. Turner. Political Theory. 41.4. 2013. 648-675.

3. Republicanism, Rhetoric, and Roman Political Thought: Sallust, Livy, and Tacitus.


Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2011.

Reviewed in: The Classical Journal, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, Greece and Rome, The Classical Review, Perspectives on Politics, New England Classical Journal, Latomus, Gnomon, Quarterly Journal of Speech, Historische Zeitschrift.


Subject of roundtable at 2013 Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, featuring Christina Kraus (Yale University), Michèle Lowrie (University of Chicago), Cary Nederman (Texas A & M), Gary Remer (Tulane), and Joel Schlosser (Bryn Mawr).


4. The Problem of Flattery and Hobbes’s Institutional Defense of Monarchy.” Journal of


Politics
. 73.3. July 2011. 680-91.
5. “Cicero on Decorum and the Morality of Rhetoric.” European Journal of Political Theory. 10.1. January 2011. 92-113.
Translated into Spanish:
Pineda Pérez, Christian Felipe. “Cicerón: El Decorum y la Moralidad de la Retórica.” Praxis Filosófica. 35. 2013. 257-282.
6. “Acting the Princely Style: Ethos and Pathos in Cicero’s On the Ideal Orator and Machiavelli’s Prince.” Political Studies. 58.3. June 2010. 590-608.
7. “Between Contumacy and Obsequiousness: Tacitus on Moral Freedom and the Historian’s Task” European Journal of Political Theory. 8.3. July 2009. 293-311.
8. “On the Ancient Uses of Political Fear and its Modern Implications.” Journal of the History of Ideas. 69.3. July 2008. 353-373.
9 “Cato’s Virtues and The Prince: Reading Sallust’s War with Catiline with Machiavelli’s The Prince.History of Political Thought. 28.3. Fall 2007. 433-448.
10. “Skinner, Pettit, and Livy: The Conflict of the Orders and the Ambiguity of Republican Liberty.” History of Political Thought. 25.3 Autumn 2004. 377-401.
Book Chapters:

1. “Rethinking Rousseau’s Tyranny of Orators: Cicero’s On Duties and the Beauty of True Glory.” In The General Will: The Evolution of a Concept. Edited by James Farr and David Lay Williams. Cambridge. 2015. 175-196.
2. “Free Speech and Censorship in Tacitus’ Annales.” In Censorship Moments: Reading Texts in the History of Censorship and Freedom of Expression. Edited by Geoff Kemp. Bloomsbury Academic. 2015. 17-24.
3. “Tacitus and Political Thought.” In A Companion to Tacitus. Edited by Victoria Pagan.
Blackwell. Oxford. 2012. 504-28.

4. “Hayek and the Daodejing on Order and Coercion.” In A Bridge too Far?


Commonalities and Differences between China and the United States
. Edited by
Robert Grafstein and Fan Wen. Lexington Books. Lanham. 2009. 73-93.

Other Publications:
1. A review of Jonathan Zarecki, Cicero’s Ideal Statesman in Theory and Practice. Forthcoming in the Classical Journal.
2. A review of David Dyzenhaus and Thomas Poole, eds., Hobbes and the Law. Perspectives on Politics. 11.4. December 2013. 1152-53.
3. A review of Valentina Arena, Libertas and the Practice of Politics in the Late Roman Republic. Bryn Mawr Classical Review. 2013.8.51.
4. “Cicero, Marcus Tullius.” Entry in The Encyclopedia of Political Science. Edited by
George T. Kurian. CQ Press. Washington DC. 2011. Volume 1. 224-5
5. A review of Dean Hammer, Roman Political Thought and the Modern Theoretical Imagination. The New England Classical Journal. 36.4. November 2009. 292-293.
6. Contributor to Theodore J. Lowi, Benjamin Ginsberg, Kenneth A. Shepsle, eds. American Government. W.W. Norton and Company. New York. 2008.
7. “The Household in Aristotle’s Political Thought.” A review of D. Brendan Nagle, The Household as Foundation of Aristotle’s Polis. Review of Politics. 69.2. March 2007. 291-293.
8. A review of Bryan Garsten, Saving Persuasion: A Defense of Rhetoric and Judgment. Perspectives on Politics. 5.1. February 2007. 147-148.
9. “Geo-Politics, History, and Ideals.” A review of Geoffrey Parker, Sovereign City: The City-State Throughout History. Review of Politics. 67.4. Fall 2005. 801-802.

Current Projects:

1. Flattery and the History of Political Thought: That Glib and Oily Art. Second book project under contract with Cambridge University Press.


2. Theory’s Landscapes: Comparative Political Theory in Time and Place. Co-edited volume (with Helen Kinsella). Under contract with Palgrave.
3. Review essay on recent scholarship on Roman political thought. To be submitted to Political Theory by Spring 2016.
4. Entries on Tacitus (500 words), Sallust (250 words), and Roman Political Thought (2000 words) for the Cambridge Dictionary of Political Thought. Under contract.

5. “Agreeing to Disagree: Deliberative Democracy and the Justifications for War.” Paper


co-authored with Travis Nelson and Katherine Robiadek. Paper in preparation for journal submission.

6. “The Foundations Game: A Method for Classroom Engagement in an Introduction to


Political Theory Course.” Working paper, co-authored with Brandon Kliewer.
7. “A Tale of Two Fears: Hobbes, Lucretius, and the Political Psychology of Peace.” Working paper.

Invited Presentations and Conference Participation:

1. Participant in Liberty Fund Conference “Judgment and Freedom in Shaftesbury and Mandeville.” April, 2015.


2. Participant in Liberty Fund Conference “Liberty and the Law in Samuel I and II.” February, 2015.
3. “A Tale of Two Fears: Lucretius, Hobbes, and the Political Psychology of Peace.” Paper to be presented at Conference titled “Conceiving Peace, Pacification, and Conflict Resolution.” Sponsored by Center for Early Modern Studies. UW-Madison. February, 2014.
4. Participant in Liberty Fund conference “Liberty and Responsibility in Adam Smith.” August, 2015.
5. “Rhetoric and the History of Political Thought.” Department of Politics and International Studies. Cambridge University. April, 2014.
6. Participant in Liberty Fund conference “Liberty, Politics, and Skepticism in Cicero and Montaigne.” June, 2013.
7. “Cicero, Smith, and Propriety.” UC-Davis Political Theory Workshop, Scottish
Enlightenment Series. April, 2013.

8. “Why Can’t We Be Friends?: Flattery, Friendship, and the Ciceronian Origins of the


Ideology of Good Rule in Roman Thought.” UNC Chapel Hill Political Theory Workshop. September, 2012.

9. “Befriending the Emperor: Flattery, Friendship, and the Good Prince in Roman


Thought.” Columbia University Political Theory Workshop. April, 2012.
10. “Naturally Convincing? Cicero and Smith on why it's Never Just Rhetoric.” Invited Speaker at Eta Sigma Phi (Classics National Honors Society) Initiation. University of Maryland, College Park. March, 2012.
11. “Democratical Gentlemen and the Lust for Mastery: Hobbes, Neorepublicanism, and the Roman Spectrum of Liberty.” Department of Political Science. Clemson University. December, 2011.
12. Participant in Jack Miller Center Summer Institute. Pasadena, California. August, 2011.
13. “The Problem of Flattery and Hobbes’s Institutional Defense of Monarchy;” “Machiavelli on the Problem of Flattery.” Papers presented at Current Research
Seminar at George Mason University, sponsored by the Institute for Humane Studies. October, 2010.
14. “The Problem of Flattery and Hobbes’s Institutional Defense of Monarchy.” Political Science Department, Fordham University. January, 2010.
15. “On Fear, Corruption, and Rhetoric in Sallust’s War with Catiline.” Politics Department, Fairfield University. October, 2009.
16. Participant in Reacting to the Past Summer Institute at Barnard College. June, 2009.
17. “Acting the Princely Style: Ethos and Pathos in Cicero’s On the Ideal Orator and Machiavelli’s Prince." Department of Political Science, The University of Florida. October, 2008.
18. “Generality and Naturalism: Cicero on Decorum and Civic Education.” Paper presented at symposium on General Will in honor of Patrick Riley. University of Wisconsin, Madison. October, 2008.
19. Participant in Institute for Humane Studies teaching conference “Liberty and the Art of Teaching.” March, 2008.
20. Participant in Liberty Fund conference “F.A. Hayek’s The Constitution of Liberty.” January, 2008.
Fellowships and Awards:

1. Resident Fellowship. Institute for Research in the Humanities. UW-Madison. Awarded Spring 2015, to be held Fall 2015.


2. Co-recipient (with Grant Nelsestuen, Department of Classics; Adrienne Hagen, Department of Classics; and Emily Fletcher, Department of Philosophy) of Mellon Workshops in the Humanities Award for “Ancient Republics and Republicanism.” 2014-2015.
3. Bradley Faculty Fellow. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Fall 2013.

4. Recipient of summer salary support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School. Summer 2012.


5. Trice Faculty Support Fund Scholar. Political Science Department. University of
Wisconsin-Madison.

6. Recipient of The University of Georgia Department of Political Science 2006 and 2009 Susette Talarico Excellence in Teaching Award for Junior Faculty.


7. Recipient of $1000 grant to invite a guest lecturer to the Georgia Ethics and Political Philosophy Workshop from The University of Georgia’s Willson Center for Humanities and Arts. Fall 2009.
8. Co-recipient of faculty seminar grant from The University of Georgia’s Willson Center for Humanities and Arts. Fall 2008.
9. Recipient of $1000 travel grant from The University of Georgia’s President’s Venture Fund. Fall 2008.
10. The University of Georgia Research Foundation New Faculty Research Grant. Summer 2006.
11. Institute for Humane Studies Graduate Fellowship. Fall 2004 through Spring 2005.
12. University Dissertator Fellowship. University of Wisconsin, Madison. Fall 2004 through Spring 2005.
13. College of Letters and Sciences Teaching Fellow. University of Wisconsin, Madison. 2004.
14. Recipient of Political Science Department Teaching Assistant Award. University of
Wisconsin, Madison. Fall 2001.
15. University Fellowship. University of Wisconsin, Madison. Fall 1999 through Spring 2000.
16. Recipient of Mildred and Clark Steyer Scholarship for Classics. University of Maryland, College Park.1996.
17. Recipient of Walter T. Shirley Scholarship. University of Maryland, College Park. 1996.
Recent Conference Presentations:


1. “A Tale of Two Fears: Lucretius, Hobbes, and the Political Psychology of Anxiety.” Paper to be presented at the Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2015.
2. “Why Can’t We Be Friends?: Flattery, Friendship, and the Ciceronian Origins of the
Ideology of Good Rule in Roman Thought.” Paper presented at the Midwest
Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2013.

2. The Style is the Man: Cicero and Smith on Rhetorical Propriety.” Paper presented at the Association for Political Theory Annual Meeting, 2012.
3. “From Flattery to Panegyric: Speech, Status, and Sociability in Roman Political
Thought.” Paper presented at the Midwest Political Science Association
Annual Meeting, 2012.
4. “Speaking without Ornament: The Politics of Machiavelli’s Plain Performance.” Paper
presented at the Rhetoric Society of America Annual Meeting, 2012.
5. “Cicero and Machiavelli on the Problem of Flattery.” Paper presented at American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2010.
6. “The Foundations Game: A Pedagogy of Classroom Engagement.” (With Brandon Kliewer). Paper presented at American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2010.
7. “Machiavelli’s Prince and the Problem of Flattery.” Paper presented at Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2010.
8. “Agreeing to Disagree: Deliberative Democracy and the Justifications for War.” (With Travis Nelson). Paper presented at Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting and Northeastern Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2010.
9. “The Problem of Flattery and Hobbes’s Defense of Monarchy.” Paper presented at
Southern Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2010.
10. “On Fear, Corruption, and Rhetoric in Sallust’s War with Catiline.” Paper presented at Southern Political Science Association, 2009.

11. “Cultivating a Seemly Judgment: On Oratorical and Ethical Decorum in Cicero’s Thought.” Paper presented at Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2008.


12. “Inter Pacem et Servitutem Plurimum Interest: Cicero and Tacitus on Eloquence, Liberty, and Peace.” Paper presented at American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2007.
13. “The Decline of Rhetoric and the Rhetoric of Decline: Freedom and Speech in Tacitus’ Dialogue on Orators.” Paper presented at Midwest Political Science Association Annual Meeting, 2007.
Service as Panel Chair or Discussant:
1. Midwest Political Science Association Meeting:

Chair: 2014, 2010, 2008, 2007.


Discussant: 2014, 2013, 2012, 2010, 2008, 2007, 2006.
2. Association for Political Theory Annual Meeting:
Discussant: 2014, 2012, 2011.
3. Southern Political Science Association Annual Meeting:
Chair: 2010, 2009, 2006.

Discussant: 2010, 2009, 2006.


4. American Political Science Association Annual Meeting:
Chair: 2014, 2013, 2008.
Discussant: 2014, 2013.
5. Northeastern Political Science Association Annual Meeting
Chair: 2010.
Discussant: 2010.
Service as Referee or Reviewer:

Journal of Politics, History of Political Thought, Journal of Criminal Justice, Political Studies, American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, European Journal of Political Theory, Journal of Public Policy, Polity, Cambridge University Press, New England Classical Journal, Perspectives on Politics, Review of Politics, Journal of the History of Ideas, Politics and Governance, Phoenix, Routledge, Lexington, Oxford University Press, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, Classical Journal.
Additional Professional Service:

1. Co-organizer (with Grant Nelsestuen, Department of Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies) of “Ancient Republics: Roman Republicanism.” Conference on Roman republicanism and its legacies, to be held in Madison on April 10 and 11, 2015.


2. Co-convener (with Kristin Phillips-Court, Department of French and Italian, UW-
Madison) of “Machiavelli at 500.” UW-Madison Center for the Humanities
Faculty Development Seminar. Spring 2014.


3. Co-Section Head of Political Philosophy: Historical Approaches for the 2014 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting.
4. Respondent for panel titled “Political Philosophy as a Social Practice.” Third Annual Heartland Graduate Workshop in Ancient Studies. Held in Madison on September 27 and 28, 2013.
5. Co-organizer (with Helen Kinsella, Department of Political Science, UW-Madison) of
“Theory’s Landscapes: Movements, Moments, and Memories.” Conference on
comparative political theory, held in Madison on May 10, 2013.
6. Section Head of Ancient and Medieval Political Theory for the 2012 and 2013 Northeastern Political Science Association Annual Meeting.
7. Member of Association for Political Theory 2012 Annual Meeting Program Committee.

8. Participant in Round Table on John McCormick’s Machiavellian Democracy. Northeastern Political Science Association. November, 2011.


Departmental and University Service:
University of Wisconsin-Madison:

1. Chair of College of Letters and Sciences Curriculum Committee. College level committee. Fall 2014–Spring 2015.


2. Member of College of Letters and Sciences Curriculum Committee. College level committee. Fall 2012-Spring 2015.
3 Member of College of Letters and Sciences Academic Planning Council. College level committee. Fall 2014-Spring 2015.
4. Member of Committee on Undergraduate Recruitment and Financial Aid. University level committee. Fall 2014-present.

5. Political Theory Field Chair. Department level committee. Fall 2013-present.



6. Member of Special Appointments Committee. Department level committee. Fall 2013-Spring 2014.


7. Member of Graduate Admission and Fellowships Committee. Department level committee. Fall 2012-Spring 2013.

8. Secretary of Faculty Executive Committee. Department level committee. Fall 2012-Spring 2013.


9. Faculty Coordinator of UW-Madison’s Political Theory Workshop. Department level committee. Fall 2012-present.
10. Faculty Senator. Fall 2011-Spring 2012. University level committee.
11. Member of Graduate Program Committee. Department level committee. Fall 2011-Spring 2012.
The University of Georgia:

1. Founder and coordinator of Political Theory Reading Group. (Undergraduate political


theory reading group at The University of Georgia). Fall 2009-Spring 2010.
2. Co-founder and coordinator of Georgia Ethics and Political Philosophy Workshop. Fall 2008-Spring 2010.
3. Faculty advisor for Demosthenian Literary Society at The University of Georgia. (Undergraduate debate society). Fall 2008-Spring 2010.
4. Member of Faculty Executive Committee. Department of Political Science. The University of Georgia. Fall 2006-Spring 2007.


Courses Taught:

1. Deception and Politics (Undergraduate)
2. Introduction to Political Theory (Undergraduate)
3. Rhetoric and Political Theory (Graduate and Undergraduate)
4. Hobbes and Political Theory (Graduate and Undergraduate)
5. Sociability and its Discontents (Undergraduate)
6. Roman Political Thought (Graduate and Undergraduate)
7. Reading Machiavelli (Graduate)
8. The Social Contract and its Critics (Undergraduate)
9. Ancient and Medieval Political Thought (Undergraduate)
10. Modern Political Thought (Undergraduate)
11. Flattery and Manipulation (Undergraduate)
12. Political Theory and Film (Undergraduate)
13. Liberalism, Republicanism, and Democracy (Undergraduate)
Graduate Supervision:
University of Wisconsin-Madison:
1. Ethan Alexander-Davey. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. Spring 2013. Member of Ph.D. committee. Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Virgina.
2. Fan Guangxin. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. Spring 2014. Member of Ph.D. committee. Visiting Professor at Hong Kong Baptist University.
3. Robert Gingerich. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. Spring 2014. Member of Ph.D. committee.
4. Se-Hyoung Yi. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. Spring 2014. Assistant Professor at Trinity Christian College.
5. Rebecca LeMoine. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. Summer 2014. Member of Ph.D. committee. Assistant Professor at Florida Atlantic University.



6. Katherine Robiadek. Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science. Advisor.
7. Megan Rowley. Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science. Advisor.
8. Victor Lenthe. Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English. Member of Ph.D. Committee.
9. Katelyn Jones. Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science. Member of Ph.D. committee.
10. Thomas Bunting. Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science. Member of Ph.D. committee.
The University of Georgia
1. Elliot Slane. Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science, The University of
Georgia. MA received from the Department of Political Science, The University of Georgia, Spring 2009. Member of Ph.D. committee; chair of MA thesis committee.
2. Robert Robinson. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science. The University of Georgia, Fall 2012. Member of Ph.D. committee.
3. Brandon Kliewer. Ph.D. received from the Department of Political Science, The
University of Georgia, Spring 2011. Co-chair of Ph.D. committee; co-chair of MA thesis committee. Assistant Professor at Kansas State University.
4. Tyler Suggs. MA received from the Department of Political Science, The University of
Georgia, Spring 2011. Chair of MA thesis committee.
5. Dustin Elliot. MA received from the Department of Political Science, The University of Georgia, Spring 2011. Chair of MA thesis committee.
6. Dwight Wilson. Ph. D. received from the Department of International Affairs, The
University of Georgia, Summer 2010. Member of Ph. D. committee; member of MA thesis committee. Assistant Professor at University of North Georgia.
7. Jason Villareal. MA received from the Department of Political Science, The
University of Georgia, Spring 2010. Member of MA thesis committee.
8. Isaiah O’Rear. MA received from the Department of Political Science, The University of Georgia, Summer 2007. Member of MA committee.
Undergraduate Supervision:
UW-Madison:
1. Nora Conneely. “The Use of Ciceronian Rhetoric in the American Presidency.” Supervised research presented at the 2014 UW-Madison Undergraduate Research Symposium.
2. Hanna Schieve. “Hard and Soft Power in Roman Imperialism.” Supervised research presented at the 2014 UW-Madison Undergraduate Research Symposium.
The University of Georgia:
1. Matthew Glass. Supervised thesis research presented at the 2010 Center for
Undergraduate Research Opportunities Conference at The University of Georgia.
2. Caitlin McLaughlin. Supervised thesis research presented at the 2009 Center for
Undergraduate Research Opportunities Conference at The University of Georgia.
(Received a best paper award).
3. Jannette-Ann-Michelle Shockley. Supervised thesis submitted for undergraduate honors credit. The University of Georgia. Spring 2007.
4. Andrew Munn. Supervised thesis submitted for undergraduate honors credit. The
University of Georgia. Summer 2006.




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