Abstract format



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ABSTRACT FORMAT
Below is the abstract format for the 2016 RMSETAC meeting. Please submit abstracts in 12 point, Times New Roman Font, and single spaced. Students don’t forget to indicate you are a student and if you want to be considered for the best poster/presentation. I have included an example abstract to guide your submission. It should look like this example when you are done.
Presenter Name:
Last name, First Name (i.e. Blow, Joe)
Presentation Title:
The title should begin with a capital letter but otherwise be lower case unless a capital is necessary (i.e. Genus spp., proper noun).
Authors and Contact Information:

Joe Blow, Shady Consulting, 666 Dark Lane, Scary City, CO, jbshady@somewhere.com

Sally Stiff, U.S. Adminstrivia Survey, 123 Pompous Blvd., Kafka, CO, stiff@survey.com

Carl Clueless, Know it All State University, 1 Campus Delivery, The Sticks, CO, clueless@state.edu



Abstract (250 Words or fewer):
Two hundred and fifty words to describe years of painstaking research and toil.
Presentation Format Preference:

Oral or Poster


Student:
Yes or No
If you are a student, do you want to be considered for best student poster/presentation?
Yes or No
If you prefer an oral presentation, would you consider a poster if necessary?
Yes or No
EXAMPLE ABSTRACT

Below is the abstract format. Please submit abstracts in 12 point, Times New Roman Font, and single spaced. Students don’t forget to indicate you are a student and if you want to be considered for the best poster/presentation. I have included an example abstract to guide your submission. It should look like this example when you are done.


Presenter Name:
Last name, First Name (i.e. Blow, Joe)
Presentation Title:
The title should begin with a capital letter but otherwise be lower case unless a capital is necessary (i.e. Genus spp., proper noun).
Authors and Contact Information:

Joe Blow, Shady Consulting, 666 Dark Lane, Scary City, CO, jbshady@somewhere.com

Sally Stiff, U.S. Adminstrivia Survey, 123 Pompous Blvd., Kafka, CO, stiff@survey.com

Carl Clueless, Know it All State University, 1 Campus Delivery, The Sticks, CO, clueless@state.edu



Abstract (250 Words or fewer):
Two hundred and fifty words to describe years of painstaking research and toil.
Presentation Format Preference:

Oral or Poster


Student:
Yes or No
If you are a student, do you want to be considered for best student poster/presentation?
Yes or No
If you prefer an oral presentation, would you consider a poster if necessary?
Yes or No
EXAMPLE ABSTRACT
Presenter Name:
Winkelman, Dana
Presentation Title:
Waste water effluent, estrogenic exposure, and the future of eastern plains native fishes

Authors and Contact Information:

Dana L. Winkelman, U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, Dana.Winkelman@colostate.edu

Adam Schwindt, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, ar.schwindt@gmail.com;

Kristen Keteles, EPA Region 8, Denver CO 80202, Keteles.Kristen@epa.gov;

Jordan Anderson, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, jrdn86@gmail.com

Abstract (250 Words or fewer):
Many freshwater streams and rivers are dominated by urban waste water effluent (WWE). For example, flow in the South Platte River downstream of the Denver, Colorado ranges from 69-100% WWE. WWE’s typically contain compounds associated with human use and many of these may disrupt vertebrate reproduction. Although Great Plains fishes downstream of WWE’s exhibit physiological evidence of reproductive disruption, it is difficult to predict how fish populations are responding. I will summarize three projects undertaken to understand how exogenous estrogens may be influencing Great Plains fish populations. The first two projects were designed to understand if estrogenic compounds influence reproduction and result in measurable population-level effects in two native eastern plains fish, the red shiner (Cyrinella lutrensis) and the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ongoing research consists of fish caging experiments in the vicinity of WWE’s on the eastern slope of Colorado. The first two projects indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of estrogen can result in complete reproductive failure and this may have population consequences. There appear to be transgenerational effects of exposure, mediated through parental exposure. Field caging experiments show that fish are being exposed to exogenous estrogens at levels that could indicate risk for reproductive failure.
Presentation Format Preference:
Oral
Student:
No
If you are a student, do you want to be considered for best student poster/presentation?
NA
If you prefer an oral presentation, would you consider a poster if necessary?
Yes

Presenter Name:
Winkelman, Dana
Presentation Title:
Waste water effluent, estrogenic exposure, and the future of eastern plains native fishes

Authors and Contact Information:

Dana L. Winkelman, U.S. Geological Survey, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, Dana.Winkelman@colostate.edu

Adam Schwindt, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, ar.schwindt@gmail.com;

Kristen Keteles, EPA Region 8, Denver CO 80202, Keteles.Kristen@epa.gov;



Jordan Anderson, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, jrdn86@gmail.com

Abstract (250 Words or fewer):
Many freshwater streams and rivers are dominated by urban waste water effluent (WWE). For example, flow in the South Platte River downstream of the Denver, Colorado ranges from 69-100% WWE. WWE’s typically contain compounds associated with human use and many of these may disrupt vertebrate reproduction. Although Great Plains fishes downstream of WWE’s exhibit physiological evidence of reproductive disruption, it is difficult to predict how fish populations are responding. I will summarize three projects undertaken to understand how exogenous estrogens may be influencing Great Plains fish populations. The first two projects were designed to understand if estrogenic compounds influence reproduction and result in measurable population-level effects in two native eastern plains fish, the red shiner (Cyrinella lutrensis) and the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ongoing research consists of fish caging experiments in the vicinity of WWE’s on the eastern slope of Colorado. The first two projects indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of estrogen can result in complete reproductive failure and this may have population consequences. There appear to be transgenerational effects of exposure, mediated through parental exposure. Field caging experiments show that fish are being exposed to exogenous estrogens at levels that could indicate risk for reproductive failure.
Presentation Format Preference:
Oral
Student:
No
If you are a student, do you want to be considered for best student poster/presentation?
NA
If you prefer an oral presentation, would you consider a poster if necessary?
Yes


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