Aberdeen County



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RULES OF OLD

May Key 1



Aberdeen County





  1. Aberdeen

  2. Folla Rule

  3. Garioch

Angus County





  1. Arbroath

  2. Boldavie

  3. Dundee

  4. Forfar

Ayr County





  1. Dunlop

  2. Kilwinning

  3. Tarbolton

Berwick County





  1. Bunkle

  2. Coldstream

  3. Edmundisfield

  4. Greenlaw

  5. Haliburton

Dumfries County





  1. Annan

  2. Dumfries

East Lothian County





  1. Bothwell

  2. Dunbar

Edinburgh County





  1. Buteland

  2. Corstorphine

  3. Cranstron

  4. Dalkeith

  5. Edinburgh

  6. Liberton

  7. Newton

  8. Smeaton

Fife County





  1. Balmerind

  2. Burntisland

  3. Kinghorn

  4. Pittenweem

Inverness County





  1. Inverness

Lanark County





  1. Bromilaw

  2. Cambuslang

  3. Glasgow

Northumberland County





  1. Alnwick

  2. Berwick on Tweed

  3. Coupland

  4. Hesellrigg

  5. Ilderton

  6. Middleton

Perth County





  1. Alyth

  2. Dunkeld

  3. Strathearn

Map Key 2




Roxburgh County





  1. Altonburn

  2. Ashkira

  3. Cavers

  4. Denholm

  5. Hawick

  6. Hindhope

  7. Jedburgh

  8. Kelso

  9. Lilleburn

  10. Makerston

  11. Melrose

  12. Newtoun

  13. Nisbet

  14. Plenderleith

  15. Primrose

  16. Rule

  17. Sprouston

  18. Yetholm

Selkirk County





  1. Selkirk

West Lothian County

1. Linlithgow


PART IV
RULES OF OLD


As mentioned in the introduction the family of Rule is of quite ancient origin, and goes back at least to the twelfth century in Scotland. Considerable research has been done on this phase of this family history and the results are very interesting although far from complete. Additional information may, of course be discovered in the future, but records so far in the past are usually hard to find, and in a great many areas, non-existant, because of the continuous raiding and fighting that went on for generations along the borders of Scotland, which resulted in the destruction of so many volumes of records of all kinds.
See Part I, the mane of Rule, for comments on the various spellings of the name.
Following is a compilation of a number of early rules with bits of historic information relating to each individual where available:
1128 – 1140 “Adam Roule, Richard Roule, Hugo Roule, William Roule, and John

Scotland Roule all make their appearance in these early times

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick

archeological society on 20 March 1906.

1174 “In when William the Lyon was besieging Alnwick, and the main

Northumberland body of his army ravaging the surrounding country, an English

force marching northwards to the relief of the town came upon

the king and his companions engaged in the amusement of tilting.

The sportsmen were overpowered and made prisoners, and the

Name of the knights in attendance on the king have been preserved

among the details of the negotiations following upon the capture.

They were Richard Cumin, William of Mortemer, William of the

Isles, Henry Reuel, Ralph de Vere, Jordan the Fleming, Waldive,

Son of Baldwin the Bigger and Richard Melville.”


Ref. the Rouels of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the

Hawick archeological society of 20 March 1906.

1180 “Richard Reuel is present in a court of King William at Alyth in 1180.

Perth Richard Reuel is witness to a charter of William the Lyon, dated at Forfair, 16th April 1205, confirming a gift of lands by William, Earl of Strathearn to Gilchrist his son. At various dates between 1188 and 1214, the year of William the Lyon’s death, Richard was witness to the king’s numerous benefactions to the monastery of Arbroath which he founded and largely endowed.”

Ref. the Roules of Rouel water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick

archeological society on 20 March 1906.

1204 “Henry Reuel is present in a court at Kinghorn in 1204. At various

Fife dates between 1188 and 1214, the year of William the Lyon’s death,

Angus Henry was witness to the king’s numerous benefactions to the monastery

of Arbroath, which he founded and largely endowed.”


Ref. the Roules of Rouel water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick

archeological society on 20 March 1906.


1231 “The jury comes to recognize, by Gerard of Wudrington, Robert

Northumberland of Newton, Nicholas of Denton, Robert of Trewick, Eustace of Denton, Robert of ……, Henry of Icchington, Thomas of Rule, Henry of Ilreton, Thomas of Elenehul, Hugh of Burneton, Adam of Newesum, Walter of Burdun, John of Lilleburn, Alexander Marescall, Hugh of Hesellrigg, if 80 acres of land with the Appurtenances, which the king claim V. John Le Viscomte, were of the King’s Demesne.”
Ref. Northumberland pleas from the Curia Regis and Assize Rolls. 1198 – 1272 p. 104 entry 331 roll no. 108.

1214 – 1249 “Between 1214 and 1249 we find Alan de Rule, Richard de Rule

Roxburgh and Thomas de Rule as witnesses to charters.” (1)
“During the first half of the thirteenth century, three Rules of the names of Thomas,

Richard and Alan appear as witnesses to several charters.” (2)


“In the reign of Alexander II, 1214-49, Sir Alan of Rule is a witness to the charter by which William, the son of Patrick, grants to the church of St. Mary of Coldstream and the nuns thereof the church of Herisille, he is also witness to the gift of the one half of Eschirche (Ashkirk) to the Bishopric of Glasgow.” (3)
“Between 1214 and 1249 charters are witnessed by Thomas of Rule, Richard of Rule and Alan of Rule.” (4)


  1. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 by George F. Black Ph.D. Reg. 148.

  2. Ref. the history and antiquities of Roxburghshire by Alexander Jeffrey Lib. De Mel. P. 237, 244-6, 260 Reg. Glas p. 126.

  3. Ref. the Roules of Roule Water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

  4. Ref. Rulewater and its people by George Tancred.

1225 “Adam Reuel of Stawelle, Brother and heir of Richard Reuel, resigned the

Fife lands of Balmerinach in Fyfe in favour of Queen Ermengarde, widow of William the Lyon and mother of Alexander II. On these lands of Balmerino the Queen, two years afterwards, commenced the erection of a stately abbey, the ruins whereof may yet be seen.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1240 “North Middleton called also Middleton Morell, was holden by

Northumberland John Morell of the Barons of Bolbeck in 1165, by one third of a knights fee, and about 1240, Robert de Ryhull and Christiana,

his wife had one half of it, and John de Middleton the other half.”


Ref. a history of Northumberland by John Hodgson, vol. I p. 303

1247 “A William de Somerville witnessed the resignation of the lands of Boncle

Berwick in Berwickshire by Adam Spoth in favour of Randolph of Boncle in Berwickshire, 2 August 1247, a conveyance by Roger Lardenarious in favour of William, son of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar and Christian Corbert his spouse, two charters of the lands of Bruneonolleflat granted respectively by William Landels and his son John in favour of the monks of Melrose, and a discharge by Richard de Rule of 205 a year payable from the same lands.” (Rule’s main are near Bunkle)
Ref. the Scots peerage vol. 8 p. 3

1256 “A grant to the prior and canons of Kirkham by Thomas Lord of

Northumberland Hilderton, witness Thomas de Ruyl.”
Ref. Northumberland and Durham deeds p. 226 no. 4

1260 “In 1260 Hugo Rouel is master of the hospital of St. John of Jerusalem.”

Scotland
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1296 “In 1296 Thomas and Adam Roule swore fealty to Edward I.” (1)

Roxburgh

“On the 28th August, 1296 Adam de Roule signes the Ragman Rolls along with Allyn, parson of the church of Roule in Roxburghshire, another signatory on the same date being Thomas of Roule.” (2)


“Adam de Roule and Thomas de Roule, both of county of Rokeburn, rendered homage in 1296.” (3)
“vol. I p. 70 – 71 Ragman’s Roll 1291 (those pledging

allegiance to King Edward I)”

Roxburgh County

Thomas de Roule

Adam de Roule

William de Rouley (4)




  1. Ref. the history and antiquities of Roxburghshire by Alexander Jeffrey.

  2. Ref. the Roules of Roule Water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

  3. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 Bain II p. 199-209.

  4. Ref. the history of Selkirkshire by T. Craig Brown vol. I p. 70-71

1300 “Adam de Roule (C. 1300) made a grant of four acres of land in Molle to

Roxburgh the monks of Kelso. Witnesses – Hugh de Roule and William de Roule.” (This William de Roule or Rule was probably the one who became the first Turnbull. See introduction). (1)
“Adam of Roule gifted to Kelso certain acres of land in Molle, part of the lands of Stapelaw. Adam’s wife, who is united with him in the gift, was Johanna Wyschard, daughter and heiress of the deceased Sir Henry of Halyburton, knight these Halyburtons being noted as among the earlier benefactors to the house after its foundation by David I in 1128.” (2)
“About 1300, Adam de Roule and his wife, Johanna, daughter of the said Henry Halyburton granted the monks ‘four acres of land in the tenement of Molle’, which lay in the upper part of Stapelaw, to be held so as they were not entitled to claim any commonty within their demesne – lands of Molle, for which grant the monks received the granters into their brotherhood and participation in their prayers, and engaged to celebrate one mass weekly for their souls.” (3)
“Lady Cecilia of Molle, daughter of Henry of Molle, married Simon Malevere but no information

exists to show what became of her three sisters. During the lifetime of Cecilia, Sir Gilbert Avenel appears in possession of portions of the estate of Molle upon which he had built a hall. Chalmers states that Cecilia was married to Robert, a younger son of Gervase Avenel, and that Gilbert was the issue of that union. Morton, author of the ‘Monastic Annals’, takes the same view, but both are undoubtedly mistaken. The charters in favour of the monks of Kelso prove that Cecilia was married to Simon Malverer, and that at the period these grants were made by here with consent of her husband the lands conveyed are described as being bounded by the property of Gilbert Avenel. Gilbert may have her newphew, but her son could not be. At the death of Cecilia, about 1250, the family became extinct, and the lands not gifted to the monks devolved upon the said Gilbert Avenel, but who does not seem long to have enjoyed them as they were in the hands of Sir John Halyburton whose daughter Johanna, carried the estates of Apam of Roule whom she married after the death of her first husband Ralph Wyschard. About the end of the 13th century, those lands were possessed by Alexander Molle, and in the beginning of the next century by John Molle. Before 1357 the lands seem to have been in the keeping of John de Copeland, probably Edwards, sheriff of the county, and about that date all the lands and tenements in Auldtownburn, with their pertinents, which formerly belonged to Adam of Roule, were resigned by Copeland in favour of John Ker of the forest of Selkirk.” (3)


“About 1300, William of Rule is a witness to a grant by Adam of Roule to the monks of Kelso.” (3)
“Haliburton is a place name in the county of Berwick, one of the earliest notices of which is found in a grant about 1176 by David, son of Truite by which he gave to the mother church of Greenlaw and to the abbey of Kelso the chapel of his vill of Haliburton. Walther, son of David, son of Truite, confirmed his

father’s donation and witnessed a charter of Eustachius de Vescy, Lord of Sprouston, about 1207. He had perhaps three sons: 1. William 2. Adam, whose name occurs as a witness in two charters of Matilda, countess of Angus circa 1242. 3. Sire Henry. He also witnesses a charter of the countess of Angus, also another by Richard of Lincoln in 1250 to the abbey of Kelso of the pasturelands of Molle. His line probably came to an end in a female, as there is an undated charter by which Adam of Roule and Johanna Wyschard his spouse, daughter and heiress of the late Sir Henry Haliburton granted certain lands in Molle to the abbey of Kelso.” (4)




        1. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 Kelso – 168

        2. Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

        3. Ref. the history and antiquities of Roxburghshire by Alexander Jeffrey. p. 276 – 279 Lib. de Cal p. 136, 458

        4. Ref. the Scots peerage. Vol. 4 p. 330

1302 “In 1302 William de Rue was king’s clerk to Edward I, then at Roxburgh

Roxburgh castle. (This is possibly William de Rouley).”
Ref. the history of Selkirkshire by T. Craig Brown Vol. I p. 70-71

1304 “A donation by a burgess of Glasgow, which though without date, must be

Glasgow referred to this period, is of interest, - ‘seven rigs of land lying in the field of Bromilaw between the land of Sir Walter of Roule on the east, and the land of Sir Walter of Roule on the east, and the land of Saint Mary, which is held by Sir John Wyschard, on the west, also another rig lying in the same field, between the land of Sir Walter of Roule on the west, and the land of Agnes Broune on the east.’ Donated to the

friars preachers. Charter granted in 1304 by Robert Wischard, bishop of Glasgow.”


Ref translation from Latin of deeds scholarships of Glasgow University a Maitland club publication.

1320 “On 30th July, 1317, Alan of Roule, then an English subject, granted to

Roxburgh Adam of Yetham, his manor of Roule with Neyfs and their sequals, to which Alan affixed his seal in presence of Donald, Earl of Marre and other notables.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1321 “From 1321 onwards we find Walter of Rule precentor of Glasgow and in

Glasgow 1333 in the seventeenth year of Pope John XXII in the kalends of April there is a papal letter addressed to the abbot and convent of St. Mary and St. Wynnin, Kilwinning, containing a confirmation of the grant to them of the church Dunbreton by King Robert the Bruce, wherein we find Walter referred to.” (1)
“Walter de Roule, precentor in Glasgow, is mentioned between 1321 and 1333.” (2)


  1. Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.




  1. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

Reg 268, 271-2

Kelso 486

Pap. Lett. II 382

1328 “John de Roule witnessed a quitclaim by Robert de Colleuyll in 1328.”

Scotland

“Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 Kelso 480

1328 – 1371 “Part of the clan was no doubt wiped out as the result of adhering to the

Roxburgh losing cause. Thus in the reign of David II (A.D. 1328-71), we find a crown confirmation to Thomas of Cranston of a charter in his favour by William, Earl of Douglas and mar of the lands of Little-Rulwod near Denum in the Barony of Cavers. In the same reign the lands of Butland or Buteland in the Sheriffdom of Edinburgh are resigned by Thomas Rouk, (Roull) in favour of James Douglas of Strathbrok, these lands were afterwards acquired by the Borthwicks.”

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1329 “In 1329 Thomas Roule is rector of Cambusland.”

Lanark

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.



1335 – 1336 “In 1335 36 certain tenements of land in the Barony of Cavers are

Roxburgh declared to be in the hands of the King of England by the forfeiture of Thomas of Roulwode.”

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1348 “In 1348 Thomas Ruwell was witness in a justiciary court case is

Angus Dundee.”
Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 Raa II 22

1354 “In 1354 Adam of Roule grants a charter of his lands of Altonburn to John

Roxburgh of Coupland, who in 1357 conveyed them to John Kerr, the witnesses to this latter deed including William of Gledstones and William de Roule.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1358 – 1361 “Thomas de Rowle or Roule witnessed the grant of the Forest of Eteryck

Roxburgh to John Kerre in 1358, and was juror on an inquisition at Roxburgh in 1361.”
Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

Roxburgh p. 9

Bain IV 61

1361 “On the 15th June 1361, there is an inquisition taken at Roxburgh before

Roxburgh Robert of Tugghalle, the English Chamberlain of Berwick of Tweed by William of Roule, Nicolas of Rothersford, David of Quitton, and nine other jurors, who say that Sir Edward Balliol, formerly king of Scotland, gave by charter to Sir Alexander of Mowbray and his heirs before the battle of Halydoun Hillle six messuages and three carucates of land in the town of Malcarstone in the country of Rozburgh, which were Sir Patrick charters’s and Thomas charters’s, Scots enemies, forfeited by their rebellion.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1364 “Bernard de Roule resigned the lands of Fouceroule (now Folla Rule) in

Aberdeen Aberdeenshire to Hugh de Ross on January 20 1364.”

1367 “In March 1367, Thomas of Roule is acting on an English jury to ascertain

Roxburgh what lands in Scotland were taken from certain English subjects by the Scots enemies. Even so late in the day as 1391 we find English king issued a warrant to his chancellor, dated at Westminster 15th June in that year, for letters in favour of Thomas Sparrowe, late prisoner with the Scots, who has paid one hundred marks for ransom, wherefor the king has given him and his heirs the lands of Promset in Tevydalle in Scotland, forfeited by Robert of Roule a rebel and traitor, or the letters to be without fine as the lands are at present in the enemy’s hands and thus valueless.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1387 “Among the petitions presented to Pope Clement VII in 1387 is one by

Glasgow Matthew, Bishop of Glasgow for the promotion of certain of his clergy. The first was on behalf of John of Hawick of that diocese for a ganonry of Aberdeen in expectation of a prebend, notwithstanding that he has the vicarage of Dunlop which he is ready to resign. The second is on behalf of Walter de Roull for a canonry of Glasgow with expectation of a prebend notwithstanding that he has the church of Torbolton in the same diocese, both petitions were granted.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1390 “A branch of the family attained to much importance in Aberdeen. About

Aberdeen 1390 Thomas Roule was a burgess of that city. In 1406, as one of the Bailies, he renders to the royal treasury on behalf of the Burgh the account of the customs for the preceeding year, and he appears from the exchequer rolls to have done so regularly down to 1435. In 1417 we find him designed provost of Aberdeen and he is no

doubt the Thomas of Rowle who is a witness in 1424 to the charter of Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar and Garioch to Alexander of Seton of Gordon of the lands of Mekylwardris in the earldom of Garioch and sheriffdom of Aberdeen.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1429 Thomas Roule, Burgess etc. is not to be confused with his contemporary,

Glasgow an eminent Ecclesiastic, Mr. Thomas Roule, one of the king’s chaplains who was high in favour with James I. In 1429 Mr. Thomas Roule was presented by Archibald, Earl of Douglas to a canonry in the cathedral church of Glasgow. From 1426 – 32 he was the annual ambassador of the king of England, and in the safe conduct issued regularly to him by the monarch of that nation he is designed chaplain to the king of Scots. The warrant for 29th of December 1431 bears that Mr. Thomas Roule with ten servants, Scotsmen, in his train, is allowed to come to England and to return pleasure. In 1429 he is one of the sub-commissioners for Scotland appointed to settle conditions for observance of order on the marches.” (1)
“Thomas Roule was rector of Cambuslang in 1429 (2)


  1. Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.




  1. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703 reg 385

1430 “On 6th August 1430, Andrew Roule, lord of Primsyde with consent of

Roxburgh George his son and heir sold to Andrew Ker of Altonburn, his ten husbandlands of mains, witness Archibald of Douglas, Lord of Cavers, James Rutherfurde of that ilk, Thomas of Crenneston of that ilk, William of Liberton, Provost of Edinburgh, and Alexander Napar, John Bercare and Henry Demp-

ster Bailies of that city. In 1432 Andrew Roule designed of Prymside in the barony of Sprouston and sheriffdom of Roxburgh, the same person as the preceeding, resigned his lands of Prymsyde in favour of George of Roule his son and heir, and Margaret Ker daughter of a prudent squire, Andrew Ker of Altonburn, wife of George, infeftment being given by John Turnbull of the Fulton, Bailie of the regality of Sprouston. In 1454 Andrew Ker of Altonburn acquired the lands of Prenderlath in the barony therof from the four heiresses of Andrew Roule of Prymside, Marjorie, Isabella, Janey and Ellen.” (1)


“Richard Ker dies in January 1437 – 38. Andrew Ker succeeded his brother. As Andrew Ker lord of Altonburn, he had a charter from Archibald, fifth Earl of Douglas, confirming to him a least made by Andrew Roule, lord of Primside, of the lands of Primside. The lease is dated at Primside, Sunday 4 June 1430. The charter is dated at Bothwell, 29 January 1429 – 30. The discrepancy between the dates of lease and charter may be a clerical error, the 4 June 1413 was also a Sunday and may be the date of lease. Andrew Ker did not long hold the lands of Primside in lease, for on 20 November 1430 he had a charter from Andrew Roule with consent of George, his heir, granting to Ker the ten husbandlands of the Maynis lying on the south half of the town of Primside, (the same lands as formerly lease). If they did not extend to ten husbandlands the deficiency was to be made up by the granters land on the north side of the town. P. 230. Andrew Ker had, on 4 May 1439 charters from Archibald, Earl of Douglas, granting him the land of Primside resigned by three daughters of the late Adam Roule, and on 13 Feb. 1439 – 40 the four parts of Primside resigned by the same sisters and by a fourth sister. Andrew Ker dies about Christmas 1444, as appears from the retour of his son Andrew to the lands of Primside. The name of his wife is not on record, he had issue

so far as known: 1. Andrew, his successor. 2. James, to whom his father gave a charter, with consent of Andrew ker his son and heir, of his lands of Primside, dated 1444. 3. Thomas, holding lands in Primside, adjacent to those granted to James. 4. Margaret, designed ‘daughter of a prudent squire Andrew Ker of Altonburn,’ and pretended wife of George Roule, son and heir of Andrew Roule of Primside, who had sasine with him in the lands formerly belonging to his father in the town of Primside, now resigned by him 28 April 1432. P. 322. Further lands of the Roule family came into his hands on 12 Feb. 1454 – 55 when he had sasine of his lands of Plenderleith and Hindhope, lying in the barony of Plenderleith in Roxburghshire, resigned by the four co-heiresses of the late Andrew Roule.” (2)





  1. Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.




  1. Ref. the Scots peerage Vol. VII

1444 “In 1444 Sir Robert Roule is Chaplain of the altar of Saints Laurence and

Aberdeen Ninian in the church of Saint Nicholas in Aberdeen, and in 1468 he is chaplain to the altar of Saint Mary Magdalene in St. Nicholas, and in the same year he is a witness to a charter by Thomas of Maule, lord of Panmur, knight, to Andrew Alanson Burgess of Aberdeen of Lands in the parish of Ecclesgreig and sheriffdom of Kincardine.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1464 “On 4th May 1464 Robert Roule is on a Berwickshire inquest.”

Berwick
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1468 “In 1468 also we find Sir John Roule one of the priests of the king’s Scotland household.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1470 – 1478 “Between 1470 and 1478 we find George and John Roule witnesses to Scotland charters by Alexander, Duke of Albany.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1472 “In 1472, in the reign of James III, a safe conduct to England was issued

Scotland for the ambassadors of Scotland whose names occur in the list in the following order: the bishops of Glasgow, Aberdeen and Orkney, the abbot of Holyrood, John Liard of Rule, John Lord Hamilton, George Lord Seton, and Lord Lisle, with five Ecclesisatics of lesser rank, the objects of the mission being to appease the troubles on the borders, and to confirm the existing truce, both were successfully accomplished.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1476 “On 2nd August 1476 there is a letter of summons under the signet at the

Berwick instance of Sir John of Swinton of that ilk, knight, against John of Roule,

Patrick of Smetone, and others, for the wrongous spoiliation, awaytaking and withholding fra him of four hors out of his land of Cranschawis, the summons was served on John of Roull at the castle of Dunbar on 9th of August 1476.”

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.



    1. “John of Roule was steward of Alexander, duke of Albany in 1479.”

Scotland

Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

1489 – 1490 “In 1489 – 1490 George Roule of Edmondisfield engaged in a litigation

Berwick with Archibald, Earl of Angus, to compel the earl to deliver t him a charter of a ten merk land in the barony of Bonckle or to pay him one thousand merks according to the contract made between them, and also to warrant to George the office of captain and constable of the castle of Boncle and Bailiary of the barony thereof during George’s life. The litigation continued for several years, but the result has not been clearly ascertained.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1492 – 1503 “In the ledger of Andrew Halyburton, a merchant and shipowner of the

Scotland name (Roule) appears.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1496 “In 1496 Richard Roull receives a remission of the wheat fermes due by

Scotland him to the crown for the lands of Osanisden.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1499 “In 1499 Sir Patrick Roule is provost of the collegiate church of the

Edinburgh blessed Nicholas of Dalkieth and in 1508 he is a witness to the sasine in favour of Thomas Wache son and heir apparent of John Wache, carpenter to the Earl of Morton (an ancestor doubtless of the immortal Mansie) in a tenement and garden lying on the south side of the highway in the town and territory of Dalkeith.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1499 “In 1499 a Patrick Roule is serving in the king’s spicery.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1506 “A tuneful individual in found in the person of Bryane Roule, ‘Fiftelar’,

Scotland who with a number of harpers, pipers and other minstrels, received payment for his services at court in 1506.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1509 “Sir Walter Ogilvy’s son was Sir William of Stratherne, lord high

Perth treasurer of Scotland on 19 June 1507 he and his wife Alison Roull received a grant of the barony of Stratherne in the sherifdom of Inverness, the reason assigned by tradition for the gift being that Alison was the first to make known to King James IV the birth of a son by his wife Margaret Tudor. Alison Roull, who is first mentioned in the lord high treasurer’s accounts under date January 1505 – 6 as the recipient of a gold necklace from the king (James IV). She predeceased her husband. They had an only child, John.” (1)
“James IV, the register of the great seal, has various entries, the first on June 19th 1507 ‘Rex ad foedifirmam.’ According to a firm compact, the king has left to his family friends M. William Ogivly from Gedes and Alison Roull, his bride, the lands and barony of Strathern, the adjacent lands, and following farms. November 16th 1508: The king has firmly established the lands from Baldavy for his family friends M. William Ogilvy Strathern, his bride Alison Roule, and even a ‘queen harassed by slavery - - vic Banff.’ March 10th 1509 another grant of the barony of Strathern. (spelling Alisone Roule). May 8th 1509: confirmation of above (Alisone

Roule). October 22nd 1510: confirmation of landsin Banffshire (Alisone Roule). March 7th 1513: Rex, -- for gratuitous service freely given to him not only in the kingdom but even for going repeatedly beyond the kingdom in special service on behalf of royal business executed in Gaul and lower Germany, the king has established for his family friend William Ogilvy for Strathern, an attendant, and his bride Alison the lands and barony of Strathern. This is matched by a charter in the register of the privy seal of March 12th 1513: “A letter maid to William Ogilvy of Stratherne, knight, -- makand mention that the king’s grace gaif to him and Alison Roule his spous, all and hole his landis and barony of Stratherne.’ In both these charters the special services of William Ogilvy are mentioned, in the latter in a long passage not quoted above.” (Note: some of the above entries have been translated from the Latin). (2)


“Margaret Tudo, widow of King Jas. IV and friend of Alison Roull (wife of Lord Wm Ogilvie, lord high treasure of Scotland) James having been killed in the Battle of Flodden, took for her second husband in August 1514, Archibald Douglas 6th Earl of Angus, from whom she procured a divorce in March 1526. Third marriage in 1526 was to Henry Stewart who was created Lord Methven 17th July 1528. Margaret Tudor died at Methven 18th October 1541 and was buried in the Carthusian monastery of Perth.” (3)



  1. Ref. the Scots peerage vol II p. 3, 4, 6




  1. Ref. the register of the great seal




  1. Ref. the Scottish kings p. 221

1507 “Roull is included in the slender list of names which attained to distinction

Aberdeen in our early Scottish literature. That delightful poet William Dunbar in his

Edinburgh ‘Lament for the Markaris’, writes about 1509:

I see that Makaris Amang the Laif, playis heir thair padyanis syne gois to graif,

spairit is nocht ther facult: timor mortis conturbat me.

He has Tane Roull of Abirdene, and Gentill Roull of Corstorphine, two better fallowis did no mane se: timor mortis conturbat me.


Who were those members of the clan whose loss the poet laments has been a subject of inquiry ever since the days of Lord Hailes. His lordship observes ;so little is known concerning these two ecclesiastics as to leave it uncertain which of them should be considered author of the singular invective “Rowlls” cursing which indeed is the solitary memorial that remains of the talents of either one of other of two men, who received from their illustrious friend this testimony to the excellence of their natural dispositions.’ David Laing after half a century’s enquiry could throw no light on the point. To which of the two sir David Lindsay of the mount, referred in his lines:
“Quinty, Merser, Rowle, Henderson, Hay and Holland. Thocht they be died, thair libellis bene leand, qurilkis to reheirs makeith redaris to repose.”
Is now impossible to say. The only work of either poet which has come down to us is titled

‘The cursing of Sir Johne Rowlis upon the steilaris of his fowlis.’


Laing describes the poem as a strange rhapsody and Pinkerton denounces it as a stupid and detestable production, I venture to dissent from those views. The work is a very remarkable one and proves the author to have possessed powers of versification of the very highest order, -- the torrent of language pours in a hearty and genuine stream, and the words ‘come skelpin’ rank, an’ file.’ The curse is called down upon the vagabonds male and female who stole:
‘Fyve fat geiss of schir Johine Rowlis,

with caponis, henis,and othir fowlis,

That brak his zaird and stall his frutt, and raif his erbis vp be the rute, his qumeit, his aitis, his peiss, his beir, in stowk or stak, to do him dier, in barn, in houses, in kill or mill, except it had bene his awin will, his wow, his lamb, his cheis, his stirk, or ony teyndis of haly kirk, and all that lattis unkend or knawin, the vicar to dispone his awin.’
He invokes upon them every imaginable disease that afflicts the human frame, and no part the sinner’s anatomy is exempted from the denunciation. But the most surprising part of all is the conclusion, conceived in a spirit to which we are little accustomed in literature of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.
‘Now Jesu, for thy passioun,

That deit for our redemption,

Of mankind haif mercy sone,

Latt never this sentence fall thame vpone,

But grant thame grace aye till forbeir,

Resset or stowth of vthir menis geir,

And als agane the geir restoir

Till Rowle, as I have said before,

And to repent they may in time

Pray we to God. Thus endis the ryme.

This tragedy is callit, but dreid,

Rowlis cursing, quha will it ried

Finis Quod Rowll.’
Proving that under the rose of the priest there beat a kindly forgiving Scottish heart. As to the authorship, the only ‘Rowll of Abirdene’ in addition to the provost, to whom reference is made on record, is that Sir Robert Roull, chaplain at the altars of St. Ninian, St. Lawrence, and St. Mary Magdalene in the church of St. Nicholas above referred to, in no way to be confounded with Sir John. Besides, St. Nicholas was a charge in a burrows town, while there

are details in the ‘curse’ which show that it was written by a parish priest in a rural charge. I take it therefore that the Sir John who was author of the work was the Corstorphine priest. The only Roull whose name I have yet met with in connection with that parish is the John Roull above referred to, who is a witness along with Sir James Ramsay, prebendary of Corstorphine to his own sister’s charter in 1523, but Dunbar’s poem alludes to the gentle Roull of Corstorphine as dead in 1507. Sir John Roull who was one of the royal chaplains in 1468 may possibly have been the author, but his connection with Corstorphine has yet to be established.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.
Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

1523 “Thom. Roull consented to take soldiers to board.”

Northumberland
Ref. a history of Northumberland by John Hodgson

Vol. II p. 476

1523 – 1524 “In 1523 – 24 Sir James Ramsay, prebendary of Corstorphine,

Edinburgh and John Roull, are witnesses to a charter by Margaret Roull, sister of John of the lands of Medhope in Linlithgowshire. In 1523 John Roule, possibly the same individual is a witness to the act of collation of Sir John Crawford as perpetual chaplain of the chaplaincy of the B.V.M, at Kirkyntulloch on the presentation of John, Lord Fleming, the patron.”


Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1526 “John Rouil, afterwards Sir John Rowl, prior of Pittneweem before 1526,

Perth was a dignitary but not an ornament of the pre-reformation church.” (1)

Fife


“One of the most notable churchmen of the fam-

ily was Sir John Rowll, prior of Pittenweem, a great ally of Cardinal Beaton, and whose name occurs at witness to several of the cardinal’s charters. He was a follower of that Ecclesiastic in more senses than one. We find at different periods in the records of the privy seal, letters of legitimation to four sons of the prior, viz, -- John, James, William, and Ninian, he obtained a charter under the great seal erecting Pittenweem int oa burgh of reality, in a subsequent charter to the burgh he designs himself prior of Pittynweeme, alias Isle of St. Adrian of Maye and the convent thereof of the order of canons regular of St. Augustine, in the diocese of Dunkeld.” (2)




      1. Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703




      1. Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1531 “In 1531 Thomas Rowle is a tenant in Newtown, Roxburghsire.”

Roxburgh

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.


1537 “A charter was granted to the Burgh of Selkirk granting it liberty as a free

Selkirk burgh and the right to hold a fair annually on St. Laurence Day. The town council on May 15, 1537 appointed George Roull as the most able to make the town’s service duly, and no other minstrel to be employed. The council discharged all other minstrels except the said George and decreed that none be received ‘to nae bridal nor feasts’ but the said George, common minstrel, under pain of as paid by those who receive any other.” (Whether, says Sir Walter Scott, the ballads were originally the compositions of minstrels, professing the joint arts of poetry and music, or whether they were the occasional effusions of some self taught bard is a question into which I do not mean to inquire but it is certain

that till a very late period the pipers, of whom there is one attached to each border town of note, and whose office was often hereditary, were the great depositaries of oral and particularly of poetical traditions. About springtime and after harvest, it was the custom of these musicians to make a progress through a particular district of the country. The music and the tale repaid their lodging, and they were usually gratified with a donation of seed corn. This order of minstrels is alluded to in the comic song of Maggie Lauder, who thus addresses a piper, “live ye upo’ the border?”
Ref. the history of Selkirkshire by T. Craig Brown Vol. II p. 38

1567 “James Roull was a tenant of the abbey of Kelso in 1567.”

Roxburgh

Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

Kelso p. 519

1570 “John Rowll signed the band of Dumfries in 1570.”

Roxburgh

Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703

R.P.C. XIV p. 66

1574 “In 1574, Martin Roule is owner of a tenement in the Walkargait

Roxburgh of Jedburgh.”
Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.

1620 “John Rowle, Yeoman of Rochester (Kent County) was one of a group

Kent appointed to make settlements of properties on land where the hospital of St. Bartholomew in Chatham was built in the seventeenth year of the reign of King James.” (King James began his reign in 1603).

Ref. from the antient records, charters and instruments of dives kinds the Ecclesiastical history and antiquities of the diocese and

cathedral church of Rochester. P. 226

1671 “Mention is made of William Rewell, in dweller in Brughtoun in 1671.”

Peebles

Ref. the surnames of Scotland p. 703



Edinb. App

Roxburgh “Robin of Rulewater, a poet, who was presumably a member of the clan, was killed by a brother minstrel, Rattlin’ Willie. Rattlin’ Willie in turn, in revenge for the slaughter of Robin met his death at the hands of the Elliots, and so was:

‘Fettered the gude right hand,

That keepit the land in mirth.’



The incident is alluded to at the end of the fourth canto of the ‘lay of the last minstrel’.”

Ref. the Roules of Roule water by Andrew Ross at the Hawick Archaeological Society on 20 March 1906.


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