Aarvold, J. E., C. Bailey, et al. (2004). "A "give it a go" breast-feeding culture and early cessation among low-income mothers



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21(3): 296-304.

Damon-Moore, H. (1994). Magazines for the millions : gender and commerce in the Ladies' home journal and the Saturday evening post, 1880-1910. Albany, State University of New York Press.

Dancyger, I. (1978). A world of women : an illustrated history of women's magazines. Dublin, Gill and Macmillan.

Daniels, S. R. (2006). "The consequences of childhood overweight and obesity." Future of Children 16(1): 47-67.

Researchers are only gradually becoming aware of the gravity of the risk that overweight and obesity pose for children's health. In this article Stephen Daniels documents the heavy toll that the obesity epidemic is taking on the health of the nation's children. He discusses both the immediate risks associated with childhood obesity and the longer-term risk that obese children and adolescents will become obese adults and suffer other health problems as a result. Daniels notes that many obesity-related health conditions once thought applicable only to adults are now being seen in children and with increasing frequency. Examples include high blood pressure, early symptoms of hardening of the arteries, type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, polycystic ovary disorder, and disordered breathing during sleep. He systematically surveys the body's systems, showing how obesity in adulthood can damage each and how childhood obesity exacerbates the damage. He explains that obesity can harm the cardiovascular system and that being overweight during childhood can accelerate the development of heart disease. The processes that lead to a heart attack or stroke start in childhood and often take decades to progress to the point of overt disease. Obesity in childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood may accelerate these processes. Daniels shows how much the same generalization applies to other obesity-related disorders-metabolic, digestive, respiratory, skeletal, and psychosocial-that are appearing in children either for the first time or with greater severity or prevalence. Daniels notes that the possibility has even been raised that the increasing prevalence and severity of childhood obesity may reverse the modern era's steady increase in life expectancy, with today's youth on average living less healthy and ultimately shorter lives than their parents-the first such reversal in lifespan in modern history. Such a possibility, he concludes, makes obesity in children an issue of utmost public health concern.


Daponte, B. O., A. Haviland, et al. "To What Degree Does Food Assistance Help Poor Households Acquire Enough Food? A Joint Examination of Public and Private Sources of Food Assistance."

We study the efficacy of public & private food assistance in alleviating food shortages among poor households by jointly considering the effects of all major forms of domestic food assistance - the Food Stamp Program, WIC, & food pantries. The analyses are based on detailed data collected in 1993 from 398 low-income households in Allegheny County, PA. We examine the effect each of the widely available forms of food assistance has on helping poor households acquire enough resources potentially to meet basic nutritional requirements. Research findings suggest that compared with other forms of food assistance, the receipt of a significant amount in food stamps has a much greater impact on whether a household attains at least the Thrifty Food Plan than the receipt of food from a food pantry or through the WIC program. 3 Tables, 1 Appendix, 32 References. Adapted from the source document. COPIES ARE AVAILABLE FROM: HAWORTH DOCUMENT DELIVERY CENTER, The Haworth Press, Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580.


Darmon, N., J. Coupel, et al. "Dietary inadequacies observed in homeless men visiting an emergency night shelter in Paris."

OBJECTIVE: To assess the dietary intake and the nutritional status of homeless men. SETTING: A night emergency shelter in Paris, France. DESIGN: Dietary survey (48-h) including alcohol intake and a questionnaire on age, duration of homelessness, smoking habits. Subjects were also weighed and measured. SUBJECTS: Ninety-seven men aged 18-72 years (mean 43.3), of whom 54% were homeless for more than 18 months, 82% were smokers and 53% were regular and/or excessive drinkers. RESULTS: The BMI distribution was shifted towards low values, the percentage of wasted persons being four times higher than in the reference population. The mean total energy intake was 2376 kcal and included a high and highly variable percentage of energy derived from alcohol (12.0% Among drinkers, the mean ethanol intake was 90 g and there was a significant negative correlation between ethanol and non-alcoholic energy intakes. The median intakes of potassium, calcium, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, and niacin were lower than European Population Reference Intakes but only the mean intake of vitamin B1 was significantly lower. Eighty percent of non-alcoholic energy was provided by charitable organisations. For most nutrients, the nutritional density of the shelter ration was not significantly different from the density of the foods purchased by the homeless. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the content of some nutrients should be increased in existing food assistance programs for homeless people in France.


Darmon, N., J. Coupel, et al. "Dietary inadequacies observed in homeless men visiting an emergency night shelter in Paris."

OBJECTIVE: To assess the dietary intake and the nutritional status of homeless men. SETTING: A night emergency shelter in Paris, France. DESIGN: Dietary survey (48-h) including alcohol intake and a questionnaire on age, duration of homelessness, smoking habits. Subjects were also weighed and measured. SUBJECTS: Ninety-seven men aged 18-72 years (mean 43.3), of whom 54% were homeless for more than 18 months, 82% were smokers and 53% were regular and/or excessive drinkers. RESULTS: The BMI distribution was shifted towards low values, the percentage of wasted persons being four times higher than in the reference population. The mean total energy intake was 2376 kcal and included a high and highly variable percentage of energy derived from alcohol (12.0% Among drinkers, the mean ethanol intake was 90 g and there was a significant negative correlation between ethanol and non-alcoholic energy intakes. The median intakes of potassium, calcium, zinc, vitamins B1, B2, and niacin were lower than European Population Reference Intakes but only the mean intake of vitamin B1 was significantly lower. Eighty percent of non-alcoholic energy was provided by charitable organisations. For most nutrients, the nutritional density of the shelter ration was not significantly different from the density of the foods purchased by the homeless. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the content of some nutrients should be increased in existing food assistance programs for homeless people in France.


Daunton, M. and M. Hilton, Eds. (2001). The Politics of Consumption. Oxford, Berg.

Davies, P. T. (2002). "Conceptual links between Byng-Hall's theory of parentification and the emotional security hypothesis." Family Process 41(3): 551-555.

Guided by our emotional security hypothesis, this commentary expands on Byng-Hall's article by addressing the role interparental difficulties play in the development of parentification. The implications that recent methodological advances have for empirically testing family models of insecurity are discussed
Davis, J. A. (1995). "Family Meals - a Thing of the Past." 73(4): 356-356.

Davison, K. K. and L. L. Birch (2001). "Weight status, parent reaction, and self-concept in five-year- old girls." Pediatrics 107(1): 46-53.

Objective. This study examined the relationship between weight status and self-concept in a sample of preschool-aged girls and whether parental concern about child overweight or restriction of access to food are associated with negative self-evaluations among girls. Method. Participants were 197 5-year-old girls and their parents. Girls' weight status (weight for height percentile) was calculated based on height and weight measurements. Girls' self-concept was assessed using an individually administered questionnaire. Parents' concern about their child's weight status and restriction of their child's access to food were assessed using a self-report questionnaire. Results. Girls with higher weight status reported lower body esteem and lower perceived cognitive ability than did girls with lower weight status. Independent of girl's weight status, higher paternal concern about child overweight was associated with lower perceived physical ability among girls; higher maternal concern about child overweight was associated with lower perceived physical and cognitive ability among girls. Finally, higher maternal restriction of girls' access to foods was associated with lower perceived physical and cognitive ability among girls with higher weight status but not among girls with lower weight status. Conclusions. At least as early as age 5 years, lower self-concept is noted among girls with higher weight status. In addition, parents' concern about their child's weight status and restriction of access to food are associated with negative self-evaluations among girls. Public health programs that raise parental awareness of childhood overweight without also providing constructive and blame-free alternatives for addressing child weight problems may be detrimental to children's mental health.
Dawley, K. (2005). "Don't kill your baby: Public health and the decline of breast-feeding in the 19th and 20th centuries." Nursing History Review 13: 214-216.

De Bourdeaudhuij, I. and P. Van Oost "Family Members' Influence on Decision Making About Food: Differences in Perception and Relationship with Healthy Eating." American Journal of Health Promotion 13(2): 73-81.

Purpose. This study provides insight into decision making about food choices in the family and its relationship with (un)healthy eating, by including the responses of four members of the family as a sampling unit.

Setting. The study was conducted through four medical centers, visited by 69 classes from 19 different schools in Belgium.

Subjects. Ninety-two family quartets, including both parents and two adolescents between 12 and 18 years old, completed questionnaires independently.

Measures. Four previously investigated measures of decision-making power (30 items on a seven-point scale) were administered, along with a short food choice questionnaire and demographic variables.

Results. Results indicate that the influence of fathers but more especially that of children is important in food decisions. Moreover, the relative influence of each family member is dependent on the kind of product or product group considered. Differences in perceptions between the four family members show the importance of considering the responses of all the people involved in family decision making. Finally, it is clear that in families where adolescents have more power, food choices are less healthy.

Conclusions. Our main conclusion is the rejection of the "gatekeeper hypothesis" as an artifact of biased measurement. A multidimensional approach to the issue of influence in food decision making in the family is potentially richer and leads to different conclusions. The necessity of the involvement of the entire family for the introduction and adoption of healthy eating is emphasized.


De Bourdeaudhuij, I. and P. Van Oost (X1998). "Family members' influence on decision making about food: differences in perception and relationship with healthy eating." American Journal of Health Promotion 13(2): 73-81.

Purpose. This study provides insight into decision making about food choices in the family and its relationship with (un)healthy eating, by including the responses of four members of the family as a sampling unit. Setting. The study was conducted through four medical centers, visited by 69 classes from 19 different schools in Belgium. Subjects. Ninety-two family quartets, including both parents and two adolescents between 12 and 18 years old, completed questionnaires independently. Measures. Four previously investigated measures of decision-making power (30 items on a seven-point scale) were administered, along with a short food choice questionnaire and demographic variables. Results. Results indicate that the influence of fathers but more especially that of children is important in food decisions. Moreover, the relative influence of each family member is dependent on the kind of product or product group considered. Differences in perceptions between the four family members show the importance of considering the responses of all the people involved in family decision making. Finally, it is clear that in families where adolescents have more power, food choices are less healthy. Conclusions. Our main conclusion is the rejection of the "gatekeeper hypothesis" as an artifact of biased measurement. A multidimensional approach to the issue of influence in food decision making in the family is potentially richer and leads to different conclusions. The necessity of the involvement of the entire family for the introduction and adoption of healthy eating is emphasized.


De Grazia, V. and E. Furlough (1996). The Sex of things : gender and consumption in historical perspective. Berkeley, University of California Press.

de Paoli, M. M., R. Manongi, et al. (2004). "Are infant feeding options that are recommended for mothers with HIV acceptable, feasible, affordable, sustainable and safe? Pregnant women's perspectives." Public Health Nutrition 7(5): 611-619.

Dear, M. J., P. Jackson, et al. (1987). "Cities, Consumption, Culture, and Postmodernism - Books in 1986." Environment and Planning D-Society & Space 5(4): 475-484.

Deblinger, E. and D. M. Hall (2000). "The case of Ryan: A child who suffered multiple episodes of sexual abuse." Cognitive and Behavioral Practice 7(3): 346-350.

The case of Ryan presents the history of a 12-year-old male who was sexually abused on multiple occasions, first by his biological father at 6 years of age and later by a female cousin. The child, no longer in contact with his biological father, is accompanied to the initial assessment sessions by his biological mother and stepfather. Ryan reports symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression, and he exhibits behavioral difficulties, including age-inappropriate sexual behaviors both at home and at school The response papers that follow this case presentation suggest assessment and treatment plans that reflect the diverse theoretical leanings of the respondents. These clinicians describe how they might design assessment and treatment plans that integrate cognitive-behavioral approaches with ideas and interventions derived from other theoretical orientations, including humanistic, family systems, and psychodynamic models
Delhaye, C. (2000). "De Geschiedenis Van De Consumptiecultuur En De Individualisering Van De Vrouwelijke Identiteit, Nederland, 1880-1920: Een Foucauldiaanse Benadering." Tijdschrift voor Sociale Geschiedenis 26(3): 263-288.

Drawing on history, sociology, cultural studies, and women's studies, this article shows how developments in Western consumption culture fashioned female individualization, here approached from a Foucauldian perspective. The Western process of individualization is conceived of as a genealogy of technologies of individuality. Feminist scholars have criticized the mainstream debate on individualization for neglecting the history of women. In trying to determine a specific feminine logic of individualization, the article focuses on the history of consumption culture, especially on fashion discourse, and presents a critical reading of fashion discourse in two Dutch magazines appearing between 1880 and 1920. The analysis shows how these journals addressed women not only in terms of class or social position but foremost as individual "autonomous" subjects. Fashion discourse provided a language in which such notions as free choice, personal taste, and individual harmony were central categories.


Delight, E., J. Goodall, et al. (1991). "What Do Parents Expect Antenatally and Do Babies Teach Them." 66(11): 1309-1314.

Antenatal inquiry of 658 parents in the North Staffordshire District Health Authority showed at least 13% to lack knowledge about a baby's potential for personal interaction when under 1 week old. Mothers and fathers varied significantly, independent of parity. Experienced parents expected later smiles. Two hundred and seventy eight of the same families were questioned three to four months after birth. Most parents had observed their baby's early responsiveness. Specific responses (looking, listening) were noted earlier when anticipated and looked for. Significant among postnatal non-responders was their antenatal selection of predominantly impersonal stimulation for a baby. The greatest degree of warmth noted in postnatal observations correlated notably with a father's antenatal interest and postnatal support from him and their friends, a mother's commitment to breast feeding and her knowledge that a very young baby can see, likes faces, and cries for emotional reasons. This highlights areas for antenatal tuition and postnatal encouragement, aiming to enhance warm early mutual regard between parents and child.


Delsing, M. J. M. H., J. H. L. Oud, et al. (2003). "Current and recollected perceptions of family relationships: The social relations model approach applied to members of three generations." Journal of Family Psychology 17(4): 445-459.

Data from 81 three-generation families (comprising 567 participants) were analyzed to assess perceptions of current- family and family-of-origin relationships. The dimensions studied (Restrictiveness, Justice, Affection, and Trust) were derived from the family systems theories as developed by Boszormenyi-Nagy (I. Boszormenyi-Nagy & B. R. Krasner, 1986; L Boszormenyi-Nagy G. Spark, 1984; I. Boszormenyi-Nagy & D. N. Ulrich, 1981) and Stierlin (H. Stierlin, 1974, 1978; H. Stierlin, I. Rucker-Embden, N. Wetzel, & M. Wirsching, 1980). The social relations model (SRM) was used to disentangle the perception scores into characteristics of the perceiver (actor component), the target (partner component), and the family as a whole. For both current-family and family-of-origin relationships, significant variances of actor as well as family components were found. Empirical evidence for an association between current-family and (mother's) family-of-origin components was only found on the dimension of Restrictiveness. Clear differences were found between the means of current- family and family-of-origin perceptions, which could be explained by differences between current and past SRM components


Dennis, C. L. (2002). "Breastfeeding initiation and duration: A 1990-2000 literature review." Jognn-Journal of Obstetric Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing 31(1): 12-32.

Dennis, C. L. (2002). "Breastfeeding peer support: Maternal and volunteer perceptions from a randomized controlled trial." Birth-Issues in Perinatal Care 29(3): 169-176.

Dennis, C. L., E. Hodnett, et al. (2002). "The effect of peer support on breast-feeding duration among primiparous women: a randomized controlled trial." 166(1): 21-28.

Background: Most mothers stop breast-feeding before the recommended 6 months post partum. A systematic review showed that breast-feeding support programs by health care professionals did not substantially improve breast-feeding outcomes beyond 2 months post partum. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of peer (mother-to-mother) support on breast-feeding duration among first-time breast-feeding mothers. Methods: We recruited 256 breast-feeding mothers from 2 semi-urban community hospitals near Toronto and randomly assigned them to a control group (conventional care) or a peer support group (conventional care plus telephone-based support, initiated within 48 hours after hospital discharge, from a woman experienced with breast-feeding who attended a 2.5-hour orientation session), Follow-up of breast-feeding duration, maternal satisfaction with infant feeding method and perceptions of peer support received was conducted at 4, 8 and 12 weeks post partum. Results: Significantly more mothers in the peer support group than in the control group continued to breast-feed at 3 months post partum (81.1% v. 66.9%, p = 0.01) and did so exclusively (56.8% v. 40.3%, p = 0.01). Breast-feeding rates at 4, 8 and 12 weeks post partum were 92.4%, 84.8% and 81.1% respectively among the mothers in the peer support group, as compared with 83.9%, 75.0% and 66.9% among those in the control group (p less than or equal to 0.05 for all time periods). The corresponding relative risks were 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-2.72) at 4 weeks, 1.13 (95% CI 1.00-1.28) at 8 weeks and 1.21 (95% Cl 1.04-1.41) at 12 weeks post partum. In addition, when asked for an overall rating of their feeding experience, significantly fewer mothers in the peer support group than in the control group were dissatisfied (1.5% v. 10.5%) (p = 0.02). Of the 130 mothers who evaluated the peer support intervention, 81.6% were satisfied with their peer volunteer experience and 100% felt that all new breast-feeding mothers should be offered this peer support intervention. Interpretation: The telephone-based peer support intervention was effective in maintaining breast-feeding to 3 months post partum and improving satisfaction with the infant feeding experience. The high satisfaction with and acceptance of the intervention indicates that breast-feeding peer support programs, in conjunction with professional health services, are effective.


Derrickson, J. P., C. Buchanan, et al. "Lessons learned from the Spend Less. Eat Well. Feel Better. program efficacy trial."

Spend Less. Eat Well. Feel Better. (SLEWFB) is a 3-hour intervention designed to improve food resource management ability, health, and food security status. This program efficacy trial targeted clients seeking financial aid to prevent homelessness. A randomized controlled design using a 1-hour food safety intervention as a control group was used. Four variables were targeted over a 30-day time period: (1) food security status, (2) basic financial management, (3) average fruit and vegetable intake, and (4) goal accomplishment. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and chi-square analysis were used. Compared with control group participants (n = 47), SLEWFB graduates (n = 48) were less likely to have to choose between food and rent expenses (chi2 = 16.5, P =.00005) and improved their fruit and vegetable intake (F of time = 8.03, P [Lt].006) regardless of financial assistance received. The findings imply that further investigation of coupling financial aid with effective life skills education is warranted.


Derrickson, J. P., C. Buchanan, et al. "Lessons learned from the Spend Less. Eat Well. Feel Better. program efficacy trial."

Spend Less. Eat Well. Feel Better. (SLEWFB) is a 3-hour intervention designed to improve food resource management ability, health, and food security status. This program efficacy trial targeted clients seeking financial aid to prevent homelessness. A randomized controlled design using a 1-hour food safety intervention as a control group was used. Four variables were targeted over a 30-day time period: (1) food security status, (2) basic financial management, (3) average fruit and vegetable intake, and (4) goal accomplishment. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and chi-square analysis were used. Compared with control group participants (n = 47), SLEWFB graduates (n = 48) were less likely to have to choose between food and rent expenses (chi2 = 16.5, P =.00005) and improved their fruit and vegetable intake (F of time = 8.03, P [Lt].006) regardless of financial assistance received. The findings imply that further investigation of coupling financial aid with effective life skills education is warranted.


Deutsch, J. (2005). "'Please Pass the Chicken Tits': Rethinking Men and Cooking at an Urban Firehouse." Food and Foodways
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