A series of lessons incorporating literacy strategies for Mt Diablo Unified School District



Download 89.72 Kb.
Date conversion19.05.2016
Size89.72 Kb.

Teaching


American History

For All


A series of lessons incorporating literacy strategies for

Mt Diablo Unified School District

5th, 8th, and 11th grade teachers,

in partnership with

University Of California, Berkeley

History-Social Science Project



11th Grade Lesson: The Vietnam War

Margaret Ljepava, MDUSD 11th Grade Teacher

Karen Sundberg, MDUSD 11th Grade Teacher

Teaching American History for All

MDUSD/UCB H-SSP

11th Grade Lesson: “The Vietnam War”
Developed by: Margaret Ljepava, 11th grade teacher (Clayton Valley High School/MDUSD)

Karen Sundberg, 11th grade teacher (Ygnacio Valley High School/MDUSD)


Teaching American History Grant Focus Question:

How did definitions of citizenship change from the 17th century to the 20th century?


11th Grade Yearlong Focus Question:

How have the powers of the United States federal government expanded or been limited since the Civil War?


Unit Focus:

The Cold War/Vietnam


Unit Focus Question: How did the Cold War affect U.S. attitudes toward government?
Unit Working Thesis:

As the Vietnam War continued to escalate with no end in sight, American disenchantment with the government's lies, with the bankruptcy of the anti-Communist ideals when given military application, and with the mounting casualties on both sides—produced a sense of frustration especially with the negative media coverage against the government, universities, and other bastions of authority.


Lesson Focus Question:

How did the Vietnam War affect the American servicemembers?


Lesson Working Thesis:

As a result of the Vietnam War, American servicemembers experienced a new form of awareness about themselves, their government and their world.


Reading Strategy:

Sentence Level Deconstruction--The Things They Carried, p. 40.

Passage Chronology--The Americans, p. 731.
Writing Strategy:

A.P.P.A.R.T.S-- “Bring ‘em Home”, c. 1965 (Pete Seeger) and “Ballad of the Green Beret, c. 1966 (Barry Sandler).


Suggested Amount of Time:

Three class periods



Textbook:

Danzer, Gerald et al. The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century. Evanston, Illinois: McDougal Littell Inc., 2006, chapter 22, sections 1 through 5; pp. 730-765.



Other Resources:

Primary Source(s)--O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1990, p. 40.

Secondary Sources--Music----“Bring ‘em Home”, by Pete Seeger, sung by Barbara Dane

“Ballad of the Green Beret”, by Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler

and Robin Moore, sung by Barry Sadler

Context of the lesson in the unit:

Strategies may be used on various days or according to the lesson procedure outlined

below.
Concept of citizenship embedded in the lesson:

The Vietnam War caused many Americans to reevaluate the ways they understood and experienced citizenship and patriotism.


Lesson Procedure:
Day One:

  1. Introduction: Introduce the Vietnam War as a component of the Cold War. Remind students of Unit Focus Question.

  2. Reading Strategy: Hand out “Passage Chronology” worksheets, (chapter 22, section 1,

  3. p. 731). Have students complete the worksheet on their own (after instructions) and then create an “Annotated Timeline”.

  4. Note Taking Strategy: Complete “Bifold Notes” while reading chapter 22, section 1.

  5. Homework: Read chapter 22, section 2, pp. 736-741. Complete “Guided Reading” workbook activity.

Day Two:


  1. Introduction: Give quiz on chapter 22, sections 1 & 2. Have students exchange quizzes and correct. Students should read questions and answers aloud. Introduce chapter 22, section 3 with a discussion on the divisiveness of the war on the American servicemembers and the American public in general.

  2. Reading Strategy: Sentence Deconstruction on The Things They Carried, p. 40.

  3. Viewing: Show “The ‘60s”-“The Century--America’s Time” with video guide.

  4. Homework: Read chapter 22, section 4. Complete “Guided Reading” workbook activity.

Day Three:



  1. Introduction: Give quiz on chapter 22, section 4. Have students exchange quizzes and correct. Students should read questions and answers during this activity. Discussion should accompany this task.

  2. Writing Strategy: Hand out “A.P.P.A.R.T.S.” organizer. Hand out lyrics. Play “Bring ‘em Home” and “Ballad of the Green Beret”. Have students complete organizer; debrief.

  3. Homework: Read chapter 22, section 5. Complete “Guided Reading” workbook activity.

Day Four:

Prepare for Assessment.

This lesson is designed to be taught in a team environment linking U. S. History and English III curriculum. The Things They Carried is taught in English III concurrently with lessons on the Vietnam War in U. S. History.




History-Social Science Content Standards:
11.9 Students analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II.

  1. Discuss the establishment of the United Nations and International Declaration of Human Rights, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and their importance in shaping modern Europe and maintaining peace and international order.

  2. Understand the role of military alliances, including NATO and SEATO, in deterring communist aggression and maintaining security during the Cold War.

  3. Trace the origins and geopolitical consequences (foreign and domestic) of the Cold War and containment policy, including the following:

    • The era of McCarthyism, instances of domestic Communism (e.g., Alger Hiss) and blacklisting

    • The Truman Doctrine

    • The Berlin Blockade

    • The Korean War

    • The Bay of Pigs invasion and the Cuban Missile Crisis

    • Atomic testing in the American West, the "mutual assured destruction" doctrine, and disarmament policies

    • The Vietnam War

    • Latin American policy

  4. List the effects of foreign policy on domestic policies and vice versa (e.g., protests during the war in Vietnam, the "nuclear freeze" movement).


Historical and Social Sciences Analysis Skills:

Historical Interpretation


  1. Students show the connections, causal and otherwise, between particular historical events and larger social, economic, and political trends and developments.

  2. Students recognize the complexity of historical causes and effects, including the limitations on determining cause and effect.


Reading/Language Arts Content Standards:

Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level Appropriate Text
2.2 Analyze the way in which clarity of meaning is affected by the patterns of organization, hierarchical structures, repetition of the main ideas, syntax, and word choice in the text.
2.4 Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author's arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations.
2.5 Analyze an author's implicit and explicit philosophical assumptions and beliefs about a subject.

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text
3.2 Analyze the way in which the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, using textual evidence to support the claim.
3.3 Analyze the ways in which irony, tone, mood, the author's style, and the "sound" of language achieve specific rhetorical or aesthetic purposes or both.
3.4 Analyze ways in which poets use imagery, personification, figures of speech, and sounds to evoke readers' emotions.

Literary Criticism
3.8 Analyze the clarity and consistency of political assumptions in a selection of literary works or essays on a topic (e.g., suffrage, women's role in organized labor). (Political approach)
3.9 Analyze the philosophical arguments presented in literary works to determine whether the authors' positions have contributed to the quality of each work and the credibility of the characters. (Philosophical approach)

Comprehension
1.1 Recognize strategies used by the media to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture (e.g., advertisements; perpetuation of stereotypes; use of visual representations, special effects, language).
1.2 Analyze the impact of the media on the democratic process (e.g., exerting influence on elections, creating images of leaders, shaping attitudes) at the local, state, and national levels.
Writing Applications

2.2 Write responses to literature:


a. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the significant ideas in works or passages.
b. Analyze the use of imagery, language, universal themes, and unique aspects of the text.
c. Support important ideas and viewpoints through accurate and detailed references to the text and to other works.
d. Demonstrate an understanding of the author's use of stylistic devices and an appreciation of the effects created.
e. Identify and assess the impact of perceived ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text.

Passage Strategy for Chronology#1



French Rule in Vietnam
From the late 1800s until World War II, France ruled most of Indochina, including Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. French colonists, who built plantations on peasant land and extracted rice and rubber for their own profit, encountered growing unrest among the Vietnamese peasants. French rulers reacted harshly by restricting freedom of speech and assembly and by jailing many Vietnamese nationalists. These measures failed to curb all dissent, and opposition continued to grow.
Many Vietnamese revolutionaries fled to China, where in 1924 they began to be organized under the leadership of Ho Chi Minh. In 1930 Ho helped to create the Indochinese Communist Party, and throughout the 1930s Ho continued to orchestrate Vietnam’s growing independence movement from exile in the Soviet Union and China.
In 1940 the Japanese took control of Vietnam. The next year, Ho Chi Minh returned home and helped form the Vietminh, an organization whose goal it was to win Vietnam’s independence from foreign rule. When the allied defeat of Japan in August 1945 forced the Japanese to leave Vietnam, that goal suddenly seemed a reality. On September 2, 1945, Ho Chi Minh stood in the middle of a huge crowd in the northern city of Hanoi and declared Vietnam an independent nation.

Danzer, Gerald et al. The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century. Evanston, Illinois: McDougal Littell Inc., 2006, chapter 22, section 1, p. 731.


Content Question: Why did the Vietnamese want their independence from French Rule?

Name:____________________

Period:___________________

Passage Strategy for Chronology#1



French Rule in Vietnam

From the late 1800s until World War II,
In 1924,

In 1930,

__________________________________________________________________
In 1940,



In August 1945,

On September 2, 1945, ________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________
Content Question: Why did the Vietnamese want their independence from French Rule?

Passage Strategy for Chronology #1

(Teacher Key)

French Rule in Vietnam
From the late 1800s until World War II, France ruled most of Indochina, including Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. French colonists, who built plantations on peasant land and extracted rice and rubber for their own profit, encountered growing unrest among the Vietnamese peasants. French rulers reacted harshly by restricting freedom of speech and assembly and by jailing many Vietnamese nationalists. These measures failed to curb all dissent, and opposition continued to grow.
In 1924, many Vietnamese revolutionaries had fled to China, where they began to be organized under the leadership of Ho Chi Minh.

In 1930, Ho helped to create the Indochinese Communist Party, and throughout the 1930s he continued to orchestrate Vietnam’s growing independence movement from exile in the Soviet Union and China.
In 1940, the Japanese took control of Vietnam. The next year, Ho Chi Minh returned home and helped form the Vietminh, an organization whose goal was to win Vietnam’s independence from foreign rule.
In August 1945, when the Allied defeat of Japan forced the Japanese to leave Vietnam, that goal suddenly seemed a reality.

On September 2, 1945, Ho Chi Minh stood in the middle of a huge crown in the northern city of Hanoi and declared Vietnam an independent nation.
Content Question: Why did the Vietnamese want their independence from French Rule?
Sentence Deconstruction Reading

On the Rainy River”

In June of 1968, a month after graduating from Macalester College, I was drafted to fight a war I hated. I was twenty-one years old. Young, yes, and politically naïve, but even so the American war in Vietnam seemed to me wrong. Certain blood was being shed for uncertain reasons. I saw no unity of purpose, no consensus on matters of philosophy or history or law. The very facts were shrouded in uncertainty.

O’Brien, Tim. The Things They Carried. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1990, p. 40.


Name:__________________

Period:__________________


Sentence Deconstruction

The Things They Carried, p. 40.


Time marker/ connector words

Who (subject)

Participants

Action words (verbs/ verb phrases)

Who, What, Where

Message

Questions or conclusions-

What connections can you make from this information?

In June of 1968,

I




a war I hated








I

was






Young, yes, and politically naïve but even so,




seemed to me

wrong.








Certain blood

was being shed









I

saw




















The very

facts

were shrouded






Lesson Question: Why were young American men resistant to the draft?
Sentence Deconstruction (Teacher Key)

The Things They Carried, p.40.


Time marker/ connector words

Who (subject)

Participants

Action words (verbs/ verb phrases)

Who, What, Where

Message

Questions or conclusions-

What connections can you make from this information?

In June of 1968,

a month after graduating from Macalester College

I

was drafted to fight

a war I hated.








I

was

twenty-one years old.





Young, yes, and politically naïve but even so,

the American War in Vietnam

seemed to me

wrong.








Certain blood

was being shed

for uncertain reasons.








I

saw

no unity of purpose,













no consensus on matters of philosophy or history or law.





The very

facts

were shrouded

in uncertainty.







Lesson Question: Why were young American men resistant to the draft?

Bring 'Em Home

Written By Pete Seeger

1965

If you love your Uncle Sam,


Bring them home, bring them home.
Support our boys in Vietnam,
Bring them home, bring them home.

It'll make our generals sad, I know,


Bring them home, bring them home.
They want to tangle with the foe,
Bring them home, bring them home.

They want to test their weaponry,


Bring them home, bring them home.
But here is their big fallacy,
Bring them home, bring them home.

I may be right, I may be wrong,


Bring them home, bring them home.
But I got a right to sing this song,
Bring them home, bring them home.

There's one thing I must confess,


Bring them home, bring them home.
I'm not really a pacifist,
Bring them home, bring them home.

If an army invaded this land of mine,


Bring them home, bring them home.
You'd find me out on the firing line,
Bring them home, bring them home.

Even if they brought their planes to bomb,


Bring them home, bring them home.
Even if they brought helicopters and napalm,
Bring them home, bring them home.

Show those generals their fallacy:


Bring them home, bring them home.
They don't have the right weaponry,
Bring them home, bring them home.

For defense you need common sense,


Bring them home, bring them home.
They don't have the right armaments,
Bring them home, bring them home.
The world needs teachers, books and schools,
Bring them home, bring them home.
And learning a few universal rules,
Bring them home, bring them home.
So if you love your Uncle Sam,
Bring them home, bring them home.
Support our boys in Vietnam,
Bring them home, bring them home.
www.lyricsondemand.com

Ballad of the Green Beret

by Staff Sergeant Barry Sadler and Robin Moore, copyright 1966

Fighting soldiers from the sky


Fearless men who jump and die
Men who mean just what they say
The brave men of the Green Beret

Silver wings upon their chest


These are men, America's best
One hundred men will test today
But only three win the Green Beret

Trained to live off nature's land


Trained in combat, hand-to-hand
Men who fight by night and day
Courage peak from the Green Berets

Silver wings upon their chest


These are men, America's best
One hundred men will test today
But only three win the Green Beret

Back at home a young wife waits


Her Green Beret has met his fate
He has died for those oppressed
Leaving her his last request

Put silver wings on my son's chest


Make him one of America's best
He'll be a man they'll test one day
Have him win the Green Beret.


www.scoutsongs.com

Name:______________________

Period:______________________

A.P.P.A.R.T.S





Bring ‘em Home”

The Ballad of the Green Beret”

AUTHOR: Who created the source? What do you know about the author? What is the author’s point of view?








PLACE AND TIME: Where and when what the source produced? How might this affect the meaning of the source?








PRIOR KNOWLEDGE: Beyond any information about the author and the context of its creation, what do you know that would help you further understand the primary source? For example, are there any markings or vocabulary that you recognize and will help you read the source?








AUDIENCE: For whom was the source created and how might this affect the reliability of the source?








REASON: Why was this source produced at the time it was produced?








THE MAIN IDEA: What point is the source trying to convey?








SIGNIFICANCE: Why is this source important? Ask yourself, “so what?” in relation to the source.









Name:________________________



Period:________________________

A.P.P.A.R.T.S (Teacher Key)





Bring ‘em Home

The Ballad of the Green Beret”

AUTHOR: Who created the source? What do you know about the author? What is the author’s point of view?


Pete Seeger

Staff Sergeant Barry Sandler and Robin Moore

PLACE AND TIME: Where and when what the source produced? How might this affect the meaning of the source?


1965

Song was “revised” by Barbara Dane and a group of G.I.’s at Fort Hood in 1969

1966

Written during the Vietnam War

Barry Sandler was a Green Beret

PRIOR KNOWLEDGE: Beyond any information about the author and the context of its creation, what do you know that would help you further understand the primary source? For example, are there any markings or vocabulary that you recognize and will help you read the source?


What is napalm?

An incendiary bomb

What was a “Green Beret”?

(Special Forces—Elite)
What are “silver wings”?

Silver Wings were awarded to the Green Berets

AUDIENCE: For whom was the source created and how might this affect the reliability of the source?


The American Public

Pete Seeger is a liberal, anti-war activist

The American public-the song was written by a Green Beret

REASON: Why was this source produced at the time it was produced?


Anti-war efforts needed an anthem

Doves

Pro-war efforts used this song as propaganda for the war

Hawks

THE MAIN IDEA: What point is the source trying to convey?


The war should be ended and Americans should focus on their needs at home

It was written to encourage people to honor the servicemen and women fighting in Vietnam and to encourage the continued war effort

SIGNIFICANCE: Why is this source important? Ask yourself, “so what?” in relation to the source.

It relates the anti-war sentiments of the time

It relates the pro-war sentiments of the time---patriotism
Note Taking Strategy

The Things They Carried, p. 40
Question Answer
Was it a civil war?
Was it a war of national liberation

or simple aggression?







Who started it, and when, and why?






What really happened to the USS



Maddox on that dark night in the

Golf of Tonkin?






Was Ho Chi Minh a Communist stooge,

or a nationalist savior, or both, or neither?




What about the Geneva Accords?





What about SEATO and the

Cold War?




What about dominoes?







The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page