A course on world history is unquestionably a challenge, for teachers and students alike



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Supplements

The following supplements are available for use in conjunction with World History in Brief, in addition to this Manual and Test Banks.


TestGen Computerized Testing System. An easy-to-customize test-generation software package that presents a wealth of multiple-choice, true-false, short-answer, and essay questions. Allows users to add, delete, and print test items.
Discovering World History Through Maps and Views, Second Edition, by Gerald Danzer, University of Illinois, Chicago, winner of the AHA's James Harvey Robinson Award for his work in the development of map transparencies. The second edition of this set of 100 four-color transparencies is completely updated and revised to include the newest reference maps and the most useful source materials. These transparencies are bound with introductory materials in a three-ring binder with an introduction about teaching history with maps and detailed commentary on each transparency. The collection includes source and reference maps, views and photos, urban plans, building diagrams, and works of art.
World History Atlas Transparencies. These overhead transparencies are correlated to the Longman World History Atlas, listed below.
Guide to Advanced Media and Internet Resources for World History by Richard M. Rothaus of St. Cloud University. This pamphlet provides a comprehensive review of CD-ROM, software, and Internet resources for world civilization, including a list of the primary sources, syllabi, articles, and discussion groups available on-line.
Longman-Penguin USA Value Packages in World History. Classic titles from Penguin USA are available at a significant discount when bundled with any Longman world history textbook.
Companion Website (www.ablongman.com/stearnsbrief). Instructors can take advantage of the online course companion that supports this text. The instructor section of the website includes the instructors manual, a list of instructor links, downloadable images from the text, and Syllabus Builder, our comprehensive course management system.
Longman World History: Primary Sources and Case Studies (www.longmanworldhistory.com). LongmanWorldHistory.com, Primary Sources and Case Studies is a fully functional online source "book" to be used in the World History survey course. The core of the website is its large database of thought-provoking primary sources, case studies, maps and images carefully chosen and edited by scholars and teachers of world history. The contents and organization of the site encourage students to analyze the themes, issues, and complexities of world history in a meaningful, exciting, and informative way.
FOR THE STUDENT
New! StudyWizard Computerized Tutorial. This interactive program features multiple-choice, true-false, and short-answer questions. It also contains a glossary and gives users immediate test scores and answer explanations. Free when bundled.
Longman World History Atlas. This four-color atlas contains 56 historical maps designed especially for the world history course. Free when bundled.
World History Map Workbook in two volumes. Volume I (to 1600) and Volume II (from 1600) prepared by Glee Wilson of Kent State University. Each volume includes over 40 maps accompanied by over 120 pages of exercises. Each volume is designed to teach the location of various countries and their relationship to one another. Also included are numerous exercises aimed at enhancing students' critical thinking capabilities.
Documents in World History in two volumes. Volume I, The Great Traditions: From Ancient Times to 1500; Volume II, The Modern Centuries: From 1500 to the Present. Edited by Peter Stearns of George Mason University. A collection of primary source documents that illustrate the human characteristics of key civilizations during major stages of world history.
Timelink: World History Computerized Atlas by William Hamblin of Brigham Young University. A highly graphic, Hyper-based computerized atlas and historical geography tutorial for the Macintosh.
Mapping Civilizations: Student Activities. A free student workbook by Gerald Danzer, University of Illinois, Chicago. Features numerous map skill exercises written to enhance students' basic geographical literacy. The exercises provide ample opportunities for interpreting maps and analyzing cartographic materials as historical documents. Free when bundled.
Companion Website (www.ablongman.com/stearnsbrief). The online course companion provides a wealth of resources for students using World History in Brief. Students can access chapter summaries, practice test questions, a guide to doing research on the Internet, and over 400 annotated web links with critical thinking questions.
Longman World History: Primary Sources and Case Studies (www.longmanworldhistory.com). LongmanWorldHistory.com, Primary Sources and Case Studies is a fully functional online source "book" to be used in the World History survey course. The core of the website is its large database of thought-provoking primary sources, case studies, maps and images carefully chosen and edited by scholars and teachers of world history. The contents and organization of the site encourage students to analyze the themes, issues, and complexities of world history in a meaningful, exciting, and informative way.

Additional Exercises: What This Manual Does
Textbooks should stimulate analysis in two ways: by providing information and raising open-ended questions. Too often, they may unwittingly discourage the analytical process simply by virtue of presenting too much bulk, too many things to memorize. To combat this danger, occasional analytically oriented homework assignments during a course help students to digest and move beyond regurgitation rearrange information to make new combinations that facilitate the main purpose: to develop the ability to select and to use data to answer demanding questions and build arguments.
The following homework sets have been designed with particular attention to promoting comparative skills, addressing change over time (which involves comparison, but between two chronological points rather than two societies), testing relevant historical theories, and dealing with causation issues. Similar exercises can easily be designed for other purposes.
The exercises listed below, which have the additional merit of encouraging reading and improved note taking, were developed after fairly elaborate consultation with cognitive-science specialists skilled in working on learning improvements. They have seemed to work well. Careful pre- and post-test assessments, as well as assessments against control groups who have not taken the world history course, demonstrate that students who have used homework assignments of this sort in conjunction with the current text measurably advanced their capacity to deal with comparison, change over time, and causation issues when presented with unfamiliar materials.

Map Quiz
You should be able to identify the following on an outline map (in case of rivers, indicate roughly where they are). The test will consist of twenty items to be located in ten minutes.
Guatemala

Southeast Asia (Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, Indonesia)

Hwang Ho (river)

Nile River

Tigris and Euphrates Rivers

Spain


Indus River

Philippines

Ganges River

Each of the six inhabited continents: Asia, Europe, North America, South America, Australia, Africa

Amazon River

Argentina

Brazil

Mexico


Korea

Cuba


Sri Lanka

Iran


Angola

Sahara


New Zealand

Bosporus


Kiev

Major North American cities

Odessa (Ukraine)

United Kingdom

France

Low counties (Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg)



Moscow

Mediterranean Sea

Indian Ocean

Nigeria


Arabian Peninsula

Mecca


Balkan countries (Greece, the former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania, Albania)

Istanbul (originally Byzantium, then Constantinople)

Italy

Scandinavia (Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland)



Siberia

Andean region (Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia)

Taiwan

Black Sea



North Atlantic Ocean

Germany

Jerusalem

Toronto

Hawaii

Suez Canal



Panama Canal

Xian (originally Chang-an)



Historical Causation: Week 2 Discussion ("weeks" refer to sample schedule, on page 27 in this manual)
The emergence of Confucianism represented a significant change in Chinese culture. It was caused by, and in turn caused, other developments. For each of the two following questions, choose the two most probably correct answers and be prepared to explain your choices.
1. What caused the development and rise of Confucianism?

a) influence from other regions with attractive political philosophies

b) Confucius' distinctive genius

c) the political situation in the Zhou dynasty at the time

d) demands raised by peasant protesters
To determine your answers, refer to pp. ___ of textbook.
2. What subsequent developments did Confucianism cause?

a) the establishment of the strong-government policies under the Qin dynasty

b) upper-class educational values under the Han dynasty

c) increased importance of trade between rice and wheat growing regions



d) growth of strict monotheism in Chinese religion
To determine you answers, refer to pp. ___ of textbook.

Comparing Gender Relations in Classical China and Classical India: Week 3 Homework
In the first week of this course, we introduced you to a grid designed to help you organize your notes and thoughts for class. Grids can help you to identify the analytic points to be learned in this course. As should be obvious to you by now, we are not going to give you paper assignments and exams based upon memorization. Instead, we will ask you to put the material for the course together in ways that emphasize comparison, change over time, and the testing of historical theories. Remember that comparison involves two steps: the identification of key features and the assessment of the degree of similarity or difference between those features.
In order to give you some practice organizing points for analytic comparison, try filling in this grid on gender relations. To fill in the grid, draw on examples from the documents assigned for session 3 (date). Bring your completed grid to class.
Here are some points for you to consider as you complete this assignment:
How were women and men expected to act in each of these classical civilizations: Which behaviors were rewarded? Which were punished? Which of these traits were unique to either India or to China? Which did they share?
A grid, such as the one on the other side of this page, can help you organize your data to better answer questions like these. In doing so, you go beyond simple description and begin to perform historical analysis.






Roles for Women

Roles for Men

Differences: China only

 

 

Differences: India only

 

 

Similarities: Common to Both

 

 

Main Features of Your Native Country Today

 

 


Comparing Islam and China: Week 4 Homework
In class during week four we will discuss the social, cultural, economic, and political impact of the spread of Islam in the Middle East during the postclassical period. We can better understand this civilization by comparing it to civilizations with which we are already familiar—those of classical India and classical China. In this exercise we will compare the postclassical Middle East to classical China.
Recall that in order to successfully complete a comparison, we need to begin by identifying important features of the subjects in question and then must assess how similar or different they are from one another. From previous discussions we have developed a working familiarity with some of the most important features of classical China. In order to do your comparison, you will need a similar understanding of the features of the Islamic Middle East. You may want to begin this assignment by filling in the first row with important features of the Islamic Middle Eastern societies; this will give you a sense of the large patterns and themes of Islamic Middle Eastern civilization. Then take some time to think about how those features compare to those we have observed in China. By thinking comparatively, you will add to your understanding of the societies themselves while at the same time honing an important analytical skill.
Some questions to think about:
What implications did Islam and the dominant belief systems of classical China have for political life? What types of people were best suited to rule? How did the systems of each civilization aim to keep social order? Were there any differences in the two civilizations' approaches to wealth and how it should be distributed? What was the role of women in the Islamic Middle East? In China?





Social

Cultural

Economic

Political

Islamic M. E.:

 

 

 

 

Main

 

 

 

 

Features

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

China --

 

 

 

 

Similarities

 

 

 

 

to the Islamic

 

 

 

 

M. E.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

China --

 

 

 

 

Differences

 

 

 

 

from the

 

 

 

 

Islamic M. E.

 

 

 

 



Causation Exercise: Week 5
1. Mark the two factors that in your opinion figured most prominently in the causation of European Feudalism. Be prepared to explain your answers.

a) frequent wars

b) the shared religion of Christianity

c) adaptations of Roman traditions

d) nature of weaponry

e) strong monarchies and bureaucracies



Causation Exercise: Week 6
1. Europeans expanded over the globe after 1400. This was due to (mark any right answer and be prepared to explain your answers):

a) religion

b) population growth

c) problems in the international balance of trade

d) fear of Chinese power

e) technological change

f) new weaknesses in Asian societies

g) political rivalries in Europe

h) application of the steam engine to manufacturing

The World Economy Theory: Week 7 Homework
The goal of this week's homework is to determine how the World Economy Theory of the development of the early modern world economy agrees with the actual experiences of two different societies. To complete the first part of this exercise, fill in the row labeled "core" with the predictions that the World Economy Theory makes about core civilizations.
Next, fill in the row labeled "Britain" with actual observations about the prevailing political, social, economic, and cultural patterns in this region during the early modern period. These observations will come largely from data in the textbook and in lectures.



 

Political

Social

Economic

Cultural

Core

 

 

 

 

(predictions)

 

 

 

 

Britain

 

 

 

 

(observations)

 

 

 

 

After you have filled in the grid, think a bit about how closely the world economy predictions for a core area (row 1) agree with your observations about Britain (row 2). Then answer the following questions:


1. From the observations you have collected from the textbook and from lectures, what aspects of early modern Britain did the theory correctly predict? What does the theory fail to predict correctly? Which of the observations are irrelevant here because the theory makes no predictions about them?
You may number the individual observations in the grid itself [row 2] and then simply list the numbers below in their appropriate spots. Alternatively, if you prefer, you can write them out again.
Correct predictions for Britain:
Incorrect predictions for Britain:
Observations irrelevant to this question:
Now, complete the same task for West Africa. Fill in the row labeled "periphery" with the predictions that the World Economy Theory makes about civilizations categorized as peripheral.
Next, fill in the row labeled "West Africa" with actual observations about the prevailing political, social, economic, and cultural patterns in this region during the early modern period. These observations will again come largely from data in the textbook and in lectures.


 

Political

Social

Economic

Cultural

Periphery

 

 

 

 

(predictions)

 

 

 

 

West Africa

 

 

 

 

(observations)

 

 

 

 

2. From the observations you have collected from the textbook and from lectures, what aspects of West Africa in the early modern period did the World Economy Theory correctly predict? What does the theory fail to predict correctly? Which of the observations are irrelevant here because the theory makes no predictions about them?


You may number the individual observations in the grid itself [row 2] and then simply list the numbers below in their appropriate spots. Or, if you prefer you can write them out again.
Correct predictions for West Africa:
Incorrect predictions of West Africa:
Observations irrelevant to this question:


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