9: 00 – 11: 30--breakout Session 1 *1A 2010 ada standards for Accessible Design-Part 1



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2straight connector 1014 National ADA Symposium
Breakout Session Schedule and Descriptions


Monday, June 16th


9:00 – 11:30--Breakout Session 1
*1A) 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design-Part 1 (Continued in Session 2A)

Presenter:  Dave Yanchulis, U.S. Access Board


The ADA Standards govern the construction and alteration of facilities covered by the ADA, including places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities.  This two part session will review requirements of the 2010 edition of the ADA Standards and provide answers to frequently asked questions about the standards.  
**1B) Public Rights of Way

Presenter:  Melissa Anderson, U.S. Access Board


The Public Right of Way Accessibility Guidelines address sidewalks, street crossings, shared use paths, and other elements located in the public right of way including crosswalks, curb ramps, street furnishings, pedestrian signals, and parking.  This session will include an update of the current status of the rulemaking process, discuss the basic obligations of States and local agencies to make their facilities accessible and review the general guidelines for pedestrian facilities.  Additional in depth information for more advanced situations will be included in the PROWAG Discussion Forum Session.
1C) Leave of Absence/FMLA

Presenter: Joe Bontke, EEOC, Houston Regional Office


This session will provide guidance on an employer's obligation to provide extended leaves of absence or other accommodations to employees who are on a leave of absence and have a disability protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Because the term reasonable accommodation includes accommodations that enable the employee to perform the essential functions of his or her job, various courts have agreed with the EEOC that unpaid medical leave, for a finite period, is a reasonable accommodation if it does not pose an undue hardship. The session will explain the manner in which the EEOC and courts have evaluated extended leaves of absence and claims of undue hardship so that employers can manage employee leaves in compliance with federal and state laws. FMLA will also be discussed.
1D) Means of Egress

Presenter: Kim Paarlberg, International Code Council (ICC)


The way someone enters and moves into a building is not always the same way they move to evacuate a building in an emergency. In addition to accessible entry, persons with disabilities must be considered when designing plans and building systems used for emergency evacuation. The accessible means of egress provisions from the International Building Code (IBC) are now referenced in the federal design regulations and will be required for all new construction. This program will introduce you to the concepts, details and application of exiting provisions, and assist in understanding how the codes and federal regulations are now working to harmonize the national response to designing a building not only for ingress, but for egress as well. New technology for using elevators in high-rise buildings as part of this plan will be addressed. This presentation provides a solid foundation for the subsequent training program on emergency planning for storm shelters and fire safety.
1E) Service Animals

Presenter: Peter Berg, Great Lakes ADA Center


Service animals are defined and viewed differently under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Fair Housing Act (FHA) and the Air Carriers Access Act (ACAA).  This session will focus specifically on the rights of individuals with disabilities with service animals under the ADA and the responsibilities of entities covered by the ADA.  This session will cover who can have a service animal, what service animals are allowed, what documentation can be required or requested and when a service animal can be refused. This is a basic session targeted toward entities that provide customer service to the general public.
1F) Accessible Temporary Events

Presenter: Len Sandler, University of Iowa


Fairs, festivals, outdoor concerts, are just a few of the temporary events that millions of Americans enjoy every year. This session will discuss how to make sure people with disabilities can participate and enjoy these events along with everyone else. The session will review accessibility obligations of Title II and Title III entities, challenges to making outdoor events accessible, and best practices that result in ADA compliance and inclusion of people with disabilities.
1G) ADA Litigation

Presenter: Barry Taylor, Equip for Equality


This has been a busy year for ADA cases in the courts. This session discusses the most important ADA cases from the past year and will provide an in-depth review of each. In addition to reviewing the specific facts and ruling in each case, there will also be a discussion of the impact these cases may have on future ADA litigation. This session promises to cover a wide variety of ADA issues under Titles I, II and III.
1H) DOJ Update

Presenter: Sally Conway, U.S. Department of Justice


Sally Conway brings her years of experience with the U.S. Department of Justice and excellent training background to provide an update of ADA related activities of the U.S. Department of Justice. This session will also examine how these activities will affect future ADA implementation. This is an excellent session for anyone who has responsibility for Title II ADA compliance activities.
1I) ADA: A Civil Rights Movement

Presenter: John Wodatch, Retired Section Chief, Disability Rights, U.S. Department of Justice


This session will cover the personal journey of John Wodatch, from his beginnings in the civil rights movement in Mississippi through his storied tenure as the Director of the Disability Rights Section of the Department of Justice. Mr. Wodatch will explore the lessons and impact that the civil rights movement had on subsequent struggles for equality and fair treatment. This session will chronicle the modern history of the disability rights movement and the development of legislation from the Architectural Barriers Act to Rehabilitation Act through to the ADA.

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2:00-3:30 –Breakout Session 2
*2A) 2010 ADA Standards: Part 2 --Access Board

Presenter:  Dave Yanchulis, U.S. Access Board


This session is a continuation of 2010 ADA Standards: Part 1.
*2B) Title I Guidelines

Presenter: Joe Bontke, EEOC, Houston Regional Office


Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act addresses the rights of individuals with disabilities in employment settings. ADA Coordinators should understand the basic requirements of Title I and non-discriminatory employment practices and procedures. This session will discuss who has obligations and rights under Title I, essential functions of a position, and reasonable accommodation and accommodation policies. This session will also focus on non-discriminatory practices related to employment recruitment, application process, interviewing, pre-employment inquiries & testing, hiring, medical examinations, and performance management.
2C) Medical Marijuana & Prescription Drugs

Presenter: Chantal Woodyard, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


This session will examine some common questions surrounding reasonable accommodations for people with addiction. We will also explore what the parameters are for drug testing as well as what medical inquiries and exams an employer can require. Medical marijuana is also discussed in this session. Prescription medications are another topic that is reviewed. This session includes activities and scenarios as well as review of current court cases on the subject areas.
2D) IBC and Housing

Presenter: Presenter: Kim Paarlberg, International Code Council (ICC)


This course explores the expansion and refinement of accessible housing requirements in the building codes. The International Building Code (IBC) provides information on accessibility in all situations where people may reside- institutional and residential facilities; permanent and transient; multi-family and single-family detached. Coordination in IBC with multiple federal requirements addresses many levels of needs. Both scoping and technical provisions will be covered. The idea of ‘visitability’ for townhouses and single-family homes and their new provisions in ICC A117.1-2009 will be addressed. IBC is certified by HUD as a ‘safe harbor’ document for compliance with the Fair Housing Act.



2E) What Does Readily Achievable Mean for Your Business?

Presenter: Troy Balthazor, Great Plains ADA Center




Facilities built prior to the passage of the ADA are required to do what is "readily achievable" to meet their ADA compliance obligations. However, there is often confusion as to what "readily achievable" means. This session will clarify misperceptions and show how businesses can assess and meet this compliance obligation.
*2F) Self-Evaluation & Transition Plans-Part 1 (Repeat of 6A)

Presenters: Robin Jones, Great Lakes ADA Center & James Terry, Evan Terry Associates


Are you one of those public entities that are slightly behind in doing a self-evaluation and transition plan? Are you asking yourself, "What is a self-evaluation and transition plan?" Well then, this is the session for you. All public entities subject to Title II of the ADA must complete a self-evaluation. For public entities that have 50 or more employees, there is also a requirement to have in place a transition plan that addresses structural changes that are necessary for achieving program accessibility. Come to this two-part session if you are interested in learning more about how to approach conducting a self-evaluation and how to integrate the information gathered into a transition plan.
2G) Emergency Preparedness: When Nature Strikes

Presenters: Patricia Yeager and Nick Desutter, The Independence Center: Disability Services for Colorado; Jana Burke, Mariposa Professional Services


This session will detail the positive progression of change in El Paso county emergency management systems for persons with disabilities through a series of recent natural disasters in the community. After sounding the alarm for poor emergency response to the Waldo Canyon fire and being met with considerable resistance, the Independence Center (ILC for Colorado Springs, El Paso and 7 other southern CO counties) along with Dr. Jana Burke and the Rocky Mountain ADA Center, hosted an after action review for people with disabilities to voice their experiences, concerns and suggestions for improvement.  A written report was created and distributed around the state. Now the City of Colorado Springs and El Paso County are beginning to work together on a plan for persons with functional and access needs that will include the active input of local residents with disabilities.  The three presenters are primary initiators of this advocacy effort and will share their experiences, tools and vision for enhancing Colorado’s emergency management systems for people with disabilities. Audience members will take away innovative tools to use in their communities as they continue to increase accessibility for citizens with disabilities in emergency management programs.
2H) Accessible Correctional Facilities

Presenter: Liz Jeannette, Nebraska Department of Corrections


Correctional facilities have specific obligations under Title II of the ADA as well as the 2010 ADA Accessibility Standards. Liz Jeannette has years of experience overseeing and implementing ADA compliance obligations in correctional institutions. She will share her expertise in ADA compliance and handling unique challenges of the corrections system.
2I) Olmstead and the ADA

Presenter: Barry Taylor, Equip for Equality


Tstraight connector 2he Supreme Court’s decision in Olmstead is being applied in new and exciting ways – including to people with disabilities who are living in the community, but are still segregated in day programs and sheltered workshops. This session will address implementation and provide an update on individual states’ progress.

3:50-5:20—Breakout Session 3
*3A) Role of the ADA Coordinator

Presenter: Ed Neuberg, ADA Coordinator, City of Denver, Colorado


An effective ADA Coordinator is critical to successful ADA implementation. However, the role and responsibilities of the ADA Coordinator are often both ill defined and misunderstood. This session will clearly outline the functions of the ADA Coordinator position, the departments and community members the ADA Coordinator should interact with, and how the ADA Coordinator position should fit into the overall structure of a Title II entity.
**3B) Reasonable Accommodations

Presenter: Jana Burke, Mariposa Professional Services


The ADA requires that employers provide accommodations for applicants and employees with disabilities in order to remove workplace barriers to provide equal employment opportunity. For many employers understanding when and how they must comply can be, at times, complex. This session will help employers develop effective policies, procedures, and best practices that can assure full compliance as well as help to successfully respond to reasonable accommodation requests and needs resulting in creating a productive work environment for all employees.
3C) Federal Contract Compliance: Section 503 Final Rule

Presenter: Nicole Huggins, Denver District Office, Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs 


Effective in March the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs announced a Final Rule that makes changes to the regulations implementing Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Section 503 prohibits federal contractors and subcontractors from discriminating in employment against individuals with disabilities (IWDs), and requires these employers to take affirmative action to recruit, hire, promote, and retain these individuals. This session will discuss these new regulations that strengthen the affirmative action provisions to aid contractors in their efforts to recruit and hire IWDs, and improve job opportunities for individuals with disabilities. It will also discuss how this final rule makes changes to the nondiscrimination provisions of the regulations to bring them into compliance with the ADA Amendments Act of 2008.
3D) Accessible Construction Management

Presenter: Andrea Haenlin-Mott, Cornell University


Understanding the implications of integrated accessibility in new construction and alteration projects starts at the very beginning stages of concept and site development. It’s important to involve everyone in all aspects of the design process from the architects and designers to the construction team and most importantly, the end users.  This session will discuss these concepts and introduce the Universal Design balance with ADA compliance. A concept of ”Experiential Equity” will be discussed in the realm of design and construction processes. Achieving ideal accessibility requires comprehension and commitment from all involved with an inclusive vision from the project leaders. This session will examine and explore successful techniques to achieve this goal.
3E) Accessible Kiosks & Vending Machines

Presenters: Ray Petty, Great Plains ADA Center & Jaimie Simpson, University of Kansas


The University of Kansas and Coca-Cola teamed up to bring accessible vending machines for Coca-Cola products to KU students. As more and more items and services become available through vending machines and kiosks, their accessibility (or lack of) has received increased attention. Come to this session to find out how kiosks and vending machines can be made accessible and how partnerships between business and the disability community can increase availability.
*3F) Self-Evaluation & Transition Plans- Part 2 (Repeat of 7A)
Continuation of Part One
3G) Architectural Access & Multi-Family Housing: New Construction & Alterations

Presenter: Kathy Gips, New England ADA Center


No area of architectural accessibility requirements is as complicated as multi-family housing. Did the feds set out to confuse us? No, but it can take 30 minutes to figure out how many accessible parking spaces are required at a new multi-family housing project with a leasing office, that receives federal funds in a state that has adopted the IBC; and which of those needs to be van accessible. We will first address which laws apply in different situations, then review the scoping requirements (how many dwelling units, parking spaces and common use elements need to comply) and finally review key differences in design requirements of IBC's Type A, B and C units, UFAS units and the ADA Standards.
3H) Youth Perspective on Disability
Presenter: Emmanuel Smith, Iowa Disability Rights Commission & Tom Knaus, Graduate Student, University of Missouri
Most of us easily remember a time when the Americans with Disabilities Act did not exist, and we remember how significant it was to see President Bush sign into law that piece of legislation that would forever change the world for people with disabilities. But that was over two decades ago--since then a new generation of young people has become functioning adults in society. We call these young adults part of the "ADA Generation". They are the benefactors of the previous generations hard work.  For this generation, there has never been a time when there was no ADA. They bring a whole new and exciting perspective on today's disability issues. Audience members of all ages are invited to come and join the discussion led by some of today's best young minds in the disability field. Hear their take on where we are today and maybe get a glimpse of where the “ADA Generation” is going to take us.
3I Applying ADA & Olmstead Principles to Managed Care

Presenter: Representative from WellPoint, Inc.


The ADA supports the principles of independence and community involvement. Coupled with the Olmstead court decision supporting living in the community versus institutions, we are experiencing a massive shift in the paradigm of spending government funds to follow the individual. This shift has created an explosion in the personal care assistance industry, while at the same time providers must honor the aforementioned principals. One of the leaders in the industry will discuss the challenges and successful strategies in use to achieve managed care goals.

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Tuesday, June 16th


8:30-10:30—Breakout Session 4
**4A) Public Rights of Way

Presenter: Melissa Anderson, U.S. Access Board


Final accessibility guidelines are expected this year!  These guidelines address sidewalks, street crossings, shared use paths, and other elements located in the public right of way including crosswalks, curb ramps, street furnishings, pedestrian signals, and parking.  If published before the symposium, the session will review the final accessibility guidelines.  Otherwise, an update on the status of the rule will be covered along with a review of the most frequently asked questions regarding the proposed guidelines.  
*4B) 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design-Part 1

Presenter:  Dave Yanchulis, U.S. Access Board


The ADA Standards govern the construction and alteration of facilities covered by the ADA, including places of public accommodation, commercial facilities, and state and local government facilities.  This two part session will review requirements of the 2010 edition of the ADA Standards and provide answers to frequently asked questions about the standards.  
4C) Essential Functions

Presenter: Robin Jones, Great Lakes ADA Center


The ADA covers employees and applicants with disabilities who can perform the “essential functions” of the job, with or without reasonable accommodations. This session will cover how employers’ should determine a position’s essential functions, the importance of matching qualifications and requirements to the actual skills and abilities needed to perform essential functions, and the interplay between performance of essential functions and reasonable accommodation.
4D) Access Surveys

Presenter: John Rife Torkelson, ACCESS Partnership, LP


This presentation will focus on the tools that are necessary to both plan and complete an accessibility survey of a building, facility, or environment. Planning approaches and other logistical aspects of completing accessibility reviews will be addressed, particularly in how they relate to implementation plans. Many factors play into the implementation prioritization process including element type, cost, remodeling, feasibility, etc. when creating the final survey report. All areas will be explored and discussed by this experienced professional.

4E) Customer Service Issues

Presenter: Pam Williamson, Southeast ADA Center


This session will provide an understanding of the needs and experiences of people with disabilities as customers accessing goods and services. The session will

identify how businesses can accommodate the needs of the customer with a disability while continuing to provide a high level of customer service and

discuss basic etiquette for interacting with a customer who has a disability.
4F) Recreation Guidelines

Presenter: Bill Botten, U.S. Access Board


It’s time to focus on the FUN stuff… amusement rides, marinas, golf courses, sports facilities, playgrounds, and swimming pools!  Effective March 15, 2012, all newly constructed and altered recreation facilities were required to meet the 2010 ADA Standards.  We’ll provide the overview of the standards that apply to these facilities, you bring any questions that you might have about these new standards.
4G) Mindfulness Stress Reduction, Disabilities and Employment

Presenter: Rich Sternadori, Great Plains ADA Center


Stress, depression, anxiety, grief and other debilitating states of mind have direct correlations to mental and physical disabilities. These afflictions inform personal and employment issues, including medical costs, insurance models, addictions and substance abuse, divorce and suicide statistics, crime, domestic and workplace violence, work absenteeism, productivity, and more.  This training is designed to bring Mindfulness Stress Reduction into the lexicon for ADA Coordinators, Human Resources professionals, advocates and people with disabilities and others affected by stress in their personal or professional lives. Stressors can originate from internal - as well as - external sources. The goal of Mindfulness is to focus the mind, training our attention to our own constant, often unconscious thinking processes. Mindfulness increases the awareness and recognition of often unconscious and detrimental inner-dialogues based on regrets, fears, anxieties, self-perceptions, etc. Mindfulness provides tools toward quieting and training the mind to stay in the present moment.  This program is designed in a “Teach the Teacher” format, and includes basic Mindfulness background, neuropsychology, and correlations between stress and disabilities. The training also examines applying Mindfulness as a tool toward reasonable accommodations. The final stage of the seminar is experiential; performing the basic exercises and teaching the fundamentals to begin using the program for themselves or others.
4H) Service Animals: Advanced Discussion

Presenter: Len Sandler, University of Iowa


Service animals and emotional support animals are covered by the ADA, the Fair Housing Act, the Air Carrier Access Act as well as a number of state and local laws. There is often confusion regarding the difference between service animals and emotional support animals and which law applies to which animal under different circumstances. This session will provide an advanced discussion of the many issues that apply to these animals and their use by people with disabilities. Challenges, problem areas and best practices will be discussed.
4I) ADA Participation Action Research Consortium (PARC)

Presenter: Joy Hammel, University of Illinois-Chicago


This session will provide an overview of research activities of the ADA Participation Action Research Consortium (ADA-PARC). This consortium of ADA Regional Centers and a network of disability and ADA stakeholders will utilize a participatory Strategic Gap Analysis process a) to identify key indicators of high priority and high feasibility to collect in communities, b) create a Community Participation Action Toolkit (CPAT) for assessing these indicators within communities, c) pilot test this Toolkit within 18 communities across 6 collaborating ADA Center regions, d) analyze results and translate back to communities in the form of benchmarking reports, and e) create a toolkit of resources to accompany CPAT for both ADA Centers and community stakeholders to action plan initiatives in their communities to reduce disparities and increase full participation. The aim is to create a tool and a systematic process for assessing community participation at the community level that could be shared with communities via the ADA Center collaboration, and formally linked to ADA Center information resources and technical assistance, and future participatory research initiatives.

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10:50-12:20-Breakout Session 5
5A) Effective Communication

Presenter: Sally Conway, U.S. Department of Justice


Title II of the ADA requires state and local government entities to provide "effective communication" to individuals with disabilities. This session includes what the ADA covers in regards to "effective" communication, the types of auxiliary aides and services used to provide effective communication, obligations and responsibilities of both Title II entities and individual with disabilities, and examples of policies that may meet ADA guidelines and ensure people with disabilities receive access to communication.
*5B) 2010 ADA Standards: Part 2 --Access Board

Presenter:  Dave Yanchulis, U.S. Access Board


This session is a continuation of 2010 ADA Standards: Part 1.
5C) “Qualified” Under the ADA

Presenter: Barry Taylor, Equip for Equality


Now that the ADA Amendments Act has made it easier to be covered under the law – the new legal battleground is for employees with disabilities to prove they are qualified. This session will review the ADA and its regulations, EEOC guidance, and recent case law decision that focus on how certain accommodation requests relate to employees' abilities to perform essential job functions.
5D) Parking & Accessible Routes

Presenter: Rob Gilkerson, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


Creating and maintaining accessible parking should be straight forward and easy; however, after 20+ years, many architects, contractors, and business owners still can’t quite get it right. Rob will discuss the standards for parking & accessible exterior routes, along with their common problems and solutions. The session will include when and under what conditions a parking lot can be used as the accessible route from the public right-of-way, and why many curb ramps at the head of access aisles aren’t accessible. Mr. Gilkerson will wrap up the session with a quiz on parking.

5E) Marketing Your Business to the Disability Community

Presenter: Saundra Hathaway, Hathaway Consulting, LLC


The presentation will explore marketing to the most untapped consumer population--persons with disabilities and their families. Utilizing examples from her extensive experience in the hospitality industry, past successful campaigns will be shared while demonstrating the positive effect on a businesses bottom line. Interwoven with exemplary customer service practices this session will assist attendees in marketing efforts designed to expand their customer base.
5F) Outdoor Developed Areas– Final Rule
Presenter: Bill Botten, U.S. Access Board
New standards covering access to trails, picnic and camping facilities, viewing areas, and beach access routes on sites managed by the federal government became effective on November 25, 2013. These new standards apply to these elements and spaces as developed or altered by federal land management agencies, including the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Army Corps of Engineers.  This session will review these new standards and recently developed technical assistance material.
5G) New Web Guidelines (WCAG 2.0)

Presenter:  Bruce Bailey, U.S. Access Board


Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, also known as WCAG 2.0 is published and maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and are the internationally recognized standards for web accessibility. WCAG is a somewhat intimidating document, and the hyperlinked resources can be confusing for a first time reader. This session will provide a “walk thru” of WCAG and related materials.
5H) Transition from K-12 to Post-Secondary Education and Beyond

Presenter: Julie Brinkhoff, Great Plains ADA Center


This session will examine issues that are involved in transition from k-12 education to post-secondary education including moving from the educational services provided under IDEA to anti-discrimination protections provided by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the ADA. The session will examine issues from the perspective of educators, parents and students. The session will also discuss the importance of understanding ADA rights and responsibilities and self-advocacy before entering the world of work.
5I) History of the ADA

Presenters: John Wodatch, Retired Section Chief, Disability Rights, U.S. Department of Justice and Lex Frieden, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston


It has been 24 years since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. However, the history of this landmark legislation began long before the signing ceremony on the White House lawn. This session will provide an overview of the activities and organizations that started an independent living movement that ultimately led to the passage of the ADA. Lex Frieden and John Wodatch, bring a first hand perspective and insights to the events and activities that are part of the disability rights movement. Don’t miss the opportunity to hear from these key figures in the inclusion of people with disabilities in American life.

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2:00-3:30—Breakout Session 6

*6A) Self-Evaluations & Transitions Plans: Part 1

Presenters: Robin Jones, Great Lakes ADA Center and James Terry, Evan Terry Associates


Are you one of those public entities that are slightly behind in doing a self-evaluation and transition plan? Are you asking yourself, "What is a self-evaluation and transition plan?" Well then, this is the session for you. All public entities subject to Title II of the ADA must complete a self-evaluation. For public entities that have 50 or more employees, there is also a requirement to have in place a transition plan that addresses structural changes that are necessary for achieving program accessibility. Come to this two-part session if you are interested in learning more about how to approach conducting a self-evaluation and how to integrate the information gathered into a transition plan.
6B) Strategic ADA Policy Writing

Presenter: Candace Alder, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


“Where can I find a boiler-plate ADA policy on_____?” This question is commonly asked of our ADA Center staff and consultants. When it comes to policy writing, each entity/company needs to be strategic about what is covered and how the ADA affects their day-to-day operations. For this reason, providing a boiler-plate policy or a sample policy from another entity may not be sufficient. This session explains several common ADA policies and how to best evaluate your programs to create and implement policies that will ensure ADA compliance and accessibility for people with disabilities.
6C) Googling Applicants

Presenter: Joe Bontke, EEOC, Houston Regional Office


 Employers are increasingly using the Internet to gather information about job applicants from social networking sites such as Facebook and Linkedin.  Often some of this information would be off limits in the interviewing process.  This could present legal problems for employer and this session will highlight the risks incurred as well as advice for employers Googling information about potential employees.  This session will cover what’s legally permissible in the search process, what are the benefits v. pitfalls, motivations for searching and methods for analyzing information obtained from the Internet.
6D) A117.1 Significant Changes & Harmonization

Presenter: Kim Paarlberg, International Code Council (ICC)


The 2012 International Building Code (IBC), is currently being adopted by jurisdictions across the United States. The IBC references the 2009 ICC A117.1 Standard for ‘how to’ make buildings accessible and useable. The A117.1 was developed for the building community prior to the ADA and FHA. The A117.1 continues to coordinate with the federal requirements as well as developing criteria for new technology not currently addressed in the federal standards. This program will address new provisions in the 2009 ICC A117.1. We will also discuss the changes be presented to the ICC A117.1 development committee for the next edition of the standard.

6E What Were They Thinking?!

Presenter: J. Aaron McCullough, ADA Consulting Services


Did you hear about the museum that didn't allow the little girl in the wheelchair in because she might "get the carpets dirty"?  How about the airline that didn't have an aisle chair available for the man who used a wheelchair and he had to crawl off of the plane to get to his chair?  Or the young man with Down's Syndrome who was tasered by police for being disruptive in a theater and died during his arrest?  

We've all seen these posts on Facebook or the evening news. They're shocking and appalling. These very avoidable incidents take on a life of their own, leaving terrible negative implications for the entities that made ridiculous mistakes as well as the people with disabilities that endure these painful experiences.  This session will explore many of these events that grabbed headlines and how you can avoid the headlines yourself.


6F) Accessible Stadiums: Customer Service & Ticketing Procedures

Presenter: Nanette Bowles, Disability Service Manager, Phoenix Suns


This session will focus on the following as they relate to stadiums, arenas and areas of assembly: Ticket procedures; ADA seating clubs that provide people with disabilities opportunities to pre-purchase discount ADA seat; training tools for staff (training surveys and needs assessments, disability awareness, basic sign language, etc.); working with guests who have special dietary needs in facilities that prohibit outside food and drinks; monthly newsletters and Facebook fan pages; wheelchair escorts; service animals; and creative ways to communicate with guests who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.
6G) Importance of Signage & Way-Finding Technologies

Ron Lucie, Texas Department of Rehabilitative Services


As a pedestrian, navigating your way around a city can be difficult. As a person with a disability, this becomes and even bigger challenge. This session will stress the importance of strategic signage placement in public places to ease the task of traversing from here to there. It will also explore new technologies that are not only being used by individuals such as personal GPS way-finding, but are being used by cities as well.  Some cities are starting to experiment with a variety of new smart phone technologies to help with way-finding for its citizens and visitors. This session will discuss some of these such as the use of near-field communications and the use of QR codes that individuals can scan to get information from maps, to transit schedules, or even historical information for visitors.
6H) When DOJ Comes Knocking

Presenter: Sally Conway, U.S. Department of Justice


What happens when the Department of Justice chooses your community for a Project Civic Access review? This session will provide an overview of Project Civic Access and guidance as to how communities should prepare for these reviews.
6I) Connecting Veterans with Disabilities & Employers

Presenters: Hannah Rudstam and Wendy Stroble, Northeast ADA Center


Dstraight connector 3uring this session, we will consider two parts of a research project recently carried out by the Northeast ADA Center. The first part of this project included a survey conducted in collaboration with the National Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM) on the preparedness of employers to hire, accommodate and retain veterans with service-related disabilities. The second part of this project included a survey of veterans with disabilities on their preparedness to apply their rights in seeking and sustaining employment. We will present the findings of these two surveys and discuss program and practice implications.

3:50-5:20—Breakout Session 7
*7A Self-Evaluations & Transitions Plans: Part 2

Presenters: Robin Jones, Great Lakes ADA Center & James Terry, Evan Terry Associates


Continuation of Session 6A
7B) Discussion Forum: ADA Coordinator Issues

Presenters: Ed Neuberg, ADA Coordinator, City of Denver, Colorado & Liz Jeanette, Nebraska Department of Corrections


This session will provide an opportunity for attendees with advanced knowledge and experience as ADA Coordinators to discuss pertinent issues and problem solve. Attendees will have a chance to discuss their own everyday issues and problems they face and work with other ADA Coordinators facing similar issues to come up with possible problem solving techniques that they can take back home with them. The session will follow a guided facilitation format.
7C) Advanced Discussion Forum: Employment

Facilitators: Jana Burke, Mariposa Professional Services, Pam Williamson, Southeast ADA Center, Julie Brinkhoff, Great Plains ADA Center


This session will provide an opportunity for attendees with advanced knowledge and experience in employment to discuss pertinent issues and problem solve. The session will follow a guided facilitation format.
7D) Storm Shelters & Fire Safety

Presenter: Kim Paarlberg, International Code Council (ICC)


“The philosophy of disaster science is that it does not matter if our structures are damaged, as long as people survive.” – Annalee Newitz. While the International Building Code (IBC) has structural provisions that protect us for a limited time during an emergency, the most important part is pre-planning for emergencies. This presentation will discuss fire and safety evacuation planning and lock-down plans (required by the International Fire Code (IFC)), and provisions for storm shelters (ICC500 Standard for the Design and Construction of Storm Shelters). We will learn how individuals can increase their preparedness by a variety of means. Important information developed by United Spinal and FEMA will be referenced.

7E) Applications & Interviews

Presenter: Randi Turner, Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, Office for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services, Texas


The ADA requires employers to provide equal access to the hiring process for people with disabilities, that includes applications and interviews. This session will cover steps employers should take to ensure their applications and job announcements are non-discriminatory in language and accessible to people with disabilities. The increasing use of on-line applications will be examined. The session will also cover the potential employee's right to determine when to disclose disability and the employer's obligation to provide reasonable accommodations when needed for the interview process.
7F) Quest for Accessible Surfaces

Jennifer Skulski, National Center on Accessibility and Bill Botten, U.S. Access Board

 

Outdoor recreation environments such as parks, playgrounds, trails, picnic areas and beaches often call for the use of non-traditional surfaces outside of concrete and asphalt.  But how do you know if surfaces like sand, gravel, woodchips, shredded rubber, engineered wood fiber, artificial grass and limestone fines are accessible?  This session will dissect the technical provisions for accessible surfaces; the standard for “firm and stable;” and how “accessible surfaces” have been defined by the complaints.  Advantages of various surface materials will be presented based on national research funded by the U.S. Access Board.  Discussion will also include the need for a field test to measure the accessibility of surfaces.


7G) Effective Communication & Interpreting in Emergency Situations

Presenter: Candace Alder, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


During an emergency (medical, police, interrogation etc.) communication is vital to responding in a timely manner. In urban areas, an interpreter can be summoned within 1-4 hours if the proper policies and procedures are put into place. However, some areas have limited or no access to sign language interpreters which means that emergency medical personnel may be missing out on vital information from a Deaf individual. Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is a valuable resource that is available to help entities meet their ADA effective communication obligations and is being vastly underutilized. With the proper equipment and contract with a VRI provider, entities can have around-the-clock access to on-call qualified sign language interpreters. This session explains how VRI works, what kinds of providers are available, what equipment may be needed, maintenance requirements, common questions and concerns, scenarios in which VRI may not be appropriate, and implementation of VRI policies. This session is geared toward emergency personnel but is appropriate for any entity that has responsibilities under the ADA to provide effective communication.
7H) Housing & Disability Rights: Which Laws Apply & What Do They Require?

Presenter: Kathy Gips, New England ADA Center


Landlords, condo associations, homeowner associations and others involved in housing have obligations under the Fair Housing Act. Municipalities, counties, housing authorities and states also have obligations under the ADA. If federal funds are involved, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act probably applies as well. Confused? You are not alone. We will discuss the difference between reasonable accommodations and reasonable modifications in housing, how the ADA definition of service animals differs from the Fair Housing Act, examples of reasonable accommodations in housing, what questions housing providers may (and may not) ask, when and what kind of documentation of a disability housing providers may require and who is responsible for making accessibility improvements. People with disabilities and their advocates will learn how to make a request for a reasonable accommodation or modification. Housing providers will learn how to recognize a request for a reasonable accommodation or modification. Requirements for new construction and alterations will be presented in a separate session.
7I) Psychiatric & Cognitive Disabilities in the Workplace

Presenter: Jana Burke, Mariposa Professional Services


Cognitive and psychiatric disabilities may affect a person's awareness, memory and ability to learn, process information, interact with others, communicate and make decisions. They can often be "hidden disabilities" that do not receive the public awareness of visible disabilities. What are the rights of people with cognitive and psychiatric disabilities under the ADA? What types accommodations and auxiliary aides are often needed by individuals with these disabilities? How does the expanded definition of disability under the ADA Amendments Act effect who is considered to be "qualified" individual with a cognitive and/or psychiatric disability under the ADA?


Wednesday, June 18th



8:30-10:30--Breakout Session 8
**8A) Emergency Preparedness

Presenter: Rich Sternadori, Great Plains ADA Center


Emergency preparedness is a significant responsibility of state and local governments. Past national disasters have shown that adequately preparing for the needs of people with disabilities is a critical issue that communities must address. This session will identify steps communities should take to prepare for emergencies and discuss how to implement the actions that should be taken during emergencies. Best practices, challenges, and common mistakes will be discussed in detail.
**8B) Reasonable Accommodations (Repeat of 3B)

Presenter: Jana Burke, Mariposa Professional Services


The ADA requires that employers provide accommodations for applicants and employees with disabilities in order to remove workplace barriers to provide equal employment opportunity. For many employers understanding when and how they must comply can be, at times, complex. This session will help employers develop effective policies, procedures, and best practices that can assure full compliance as well as help to successfully respond to reasonable accommodation requests and needs resulting in creating a productive work environment for all employees.


8C) Case by Case: Review of Employment Practices

Presenter: Candace Alder, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


Participants will engage in case studies on employment in which they determine the outcome based on several key disability and employment law factors. This session serves as good practice for handling many common disability and employment issues including leave, accommodations, employee morale, workers compensation, FMLA, etc.
8D) Discussion Forum: Public Rights of Way

Facilitator: Melissa Anderson, U.S. Access Board


This session will provide an advanced discussion of Frequently Asked Questions received by the Access Board regarding accessibility in the public right of way.  The audience is encouraged to participate by providing topics which interest them most, including pedestrian access route elements, shared use paths, intersections and signals. 
8E) Discussion Forum: Title III

Facilitator: Saundra Hathaway, Hathaway Consulting, LLC


This session will provide a forum to discuss ADA related issues relevant to the business community. Participants are encouraged to bring their questions, ideas and observations. The discussion will be guided to help participants find solutions to common challenges, share best practices, and clarify legal obligations under the ADA.
8F) Access to Sports in Schools

Presenter: Ray Petty, Great Plains ADA Center


The ADA mandates an equality of opportunity for all Americans with disabilities, including school aged individuals. Participating in sports is a valuable experience for all students and recent court decisions coupled with the exposure of sports for students with disabilities is just beginning to be realized across America. This session will explore the multitude of sport opportunities for students with disabilities and the responsibility of schools and their associations to meet the integrated mandate of the ADA. The session will explore these concepts while offering enlightened strategies to compliance and opportunity.
8G) Communication Access and the Justice System

Presenter: Maggie Sims, Rocky Mountain ADA Center


When the Justice System interacts with a person who is deaf or hard of hearing and/or has low vision, decisions must be made that are based on policy that is in compliance with ADA regulations. Too often, policies are lacking, and as a result compliance is reactive to “accommodation requests.” This session has been designed to provide guidelines for policies and procedures for all Justice System personnel—civilian and sworn. The session will provide participants with an opportunity to conduct a hands-on, confidential self-assessment of policy and procedural compliance with ADA regulations that are relevant to communication access in a variety of situations. Also, during the self-assessment the presenters will provide recommendations for auxiliary services, and aids (current technologies) specific to communication access.

8H) Public Transportation & Taxis Services

Presenters: Geoff Ames & Ken Heldt, Meeting the Challenge, Inc.


Accessible transit seems plausible in theory, but what does it look like in practice? All the buses have lifts, but public transit services remain significantly segregated between fixed route and paratransit. Meanwhile, taxi services are not necessarily required to purchase all (or any) accessible vehicles. However, taxi service for people with disabilities is often limited even for people with disabilities who can access standard vehicles. What barriers to accessible transportation remain? What steps can be taken to remove those barriers? This session will appeal to advocates and individuals with disabilities who use public transit and taxis. It will also provide guidance for transit grantees and taxi operators facing the complex problems of integrating and making their services accessible to and usable by people with disabilities.
8I) Just in Time Program

Presenters: Hannah Rudstam and Wendy Stroble, Northeast ADA Center


People with disabilities represent the largest diversity population in our country today.  Yet, in many ways, disability is the “forgotten diversity.”  Diversity plans that meaningfully include disability enable the business to reach a broader talent pool, prevent turnover, become an employer of choice, and promote performance. This interactive workshop engages participants by connecting disability inclusiveness with competitive advantage in several ways:  1. By considering disability, workplace and business trends; 2. By exploring the return on investment for disability inclusive workplace practices; 3. By examining strategies and best practices for disability inclusiveness; 4. By learning about legal updates around disability and employment issues; and 5.  By working through real-life scenarios around disability inclusiveness in the workplace.  

*ACTCP foundation requirement. **ACTCP foundation elective.



(All other sessions meet ACTCP elective requirements.)


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