7th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Guide usd 457-Garden City, Kansas Course Description



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7th Grade English/Language Arts

Curriculum Guide

USD 457-Garden City, Kansas


Course Description
Middle level language arts provides an integrated study of: (1) literature, (2) media, (3) reading process, (4) oral communication, (5) writing process, and (6) language which includes grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling as tools of effective communication. Middle level language arts further develops students’ use of language as a tool for learning and thinking as well as a source of pleasure.
7th Grade English/Language Arts Scope and Sequence


Intro.

Introduction-The Power of Ideas

4

Weeks

Unit #1

Weaving a Story-Plot, Conflict and setting

4

Weeks

Unit #2

Personality Tests-Analyzing Character

and Point of View



4

Weeks


Unit #3

Lessons to Learn-Understanding Theme



4 Weeks

Unit #4

Finding a Voice-Mood, Tone and Style



4

Weeks




1st semester testing-AIMSweb in September







Unit #5

Picture the Moment-Appreciating Poetry



4

Weeks

Unit #6

Sharing Our Stories-Myths, Legends and Tales

4

Weeks

Unit #7

Writing a Life-Biography and Autobiography



4

Weeks

Unit #8

Face the Facts-Information, Argument

and Persuasion



4

Weeks




2nd semester testing-AIMSweb in January

and May and State Testing




Note: Independent reading, research, informational text and writing are integrated throughout the year. One class novel may be used each semester.



Adopted Textbooks and Supplemental Materials


McDougal Littell Literature 7
Write Source 7-Great Source Education Group
Resources from the McDougal Littell Literature Series
Best Practices Toolkit from the McDougal Littell Literature Series
SIMS

Incorporating Technology
Anthology CD ClassZone.com Smartboard

YouTube Videos Powerpoint Prezi

Bookemon Edmodo Schoolology

Quizlet Movie Maker iMovie

Computers/laptops Video presentation Internet extentions

Differentiated Instruction
Venn Diagram Kagan Strategies Jigsaw

Story Maps Small group discussions Leveled stories

Journals Sticky notes Leveled tests

Copy of notes Internet extentions



CORE Standards – 7th Grade English/Language Arts

Core Standard 1: Vocabulary and Concept Development

Identify and use a variety of types of context clues (e.g., restatement, definition) to determine the meanings of words within particular texts. Use knowledge of Greek, Latin and Anglo-Saxon roots and word parts to understand subject-area vocabulary.
Core Standard 2: Informational Text: Structure, Comprehension and Analysis
Compare and contrast the purposes and features of different types of informational texts. Identify and use the most complete, accurate and appropriate sources for particular purposes. Identify, chart and explain cause/effect connections, including those that are not explicitly stated within the text.
Core Standard 3: Literary Text: comprehension and Analysis
Analyze and describe the connection of setting, narrative voice, language, mood and tone to the plot and meaning of literary works of different lengths (e.g., short story, essay, novel) within literature. Compare reviews of literary works, identifying the main points of each.
Core Standard 4: Writing: Informational, Research and Persuasive Texts

Use a variety of strategies to develop topic sentences. Determine the purpose, audience and organization for the piece of writing. Use reading and note-taking skills to find and summarize relevant information from sources selected for accuracy, appropriateness and reliability. Write pieces with a well-defined thesis and a variety of types of supporting evidence leading to logical conclusions. Revise writing, improving clarity and organization. Edit writing, correctly crediting all ideas and wording from sources.

Core Standard 5: Writing: Literary Text

Use graphic organizers, a list or notebook of ideas, and various strategies to plan writing. Write biographical and literary texts that contain conflicts and resolutions, major and minor characters, meaningful settings, and/or expressive language. Display a command of basic narrative strategies (e.g., timing, dialogue, detailed description) to advance the plot and develop characters. Review, revise, and edit writing.

Core Standard 6: English Language Conventions

Write sentences and paragraphs that show clear relationships between main and supporting ideas. Edit parts of sentences to correct pronoun antecedents, punctuation, and verb tense agreement.

Core Standard 7: Listening and Speaking

Develop persuasive speeches, oral summaries, and research presentations that are organized to achieve particular purposes, and are supported with relevant details, reasons and examples. Deliver presentations with effective speaking techniques. Analyze oral and media communications, evaluating credibility of details and sources.




Some CCS are so inherent/integral to the course that they naturally should be addressed in all units throughout the year. These include the following:

READING CCS

  • RL.7.2 – Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

  • RL.7.10 – By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficienctly, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

  • RI.7.10 – By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6-8 text complecity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

  • R – Anchor 11 – Encounter a diverse range of engaging and culturally sensitive text and media that motivate the desire to be literate.

  • R – Anchor 12 – Read – both independently and collaboratively – print, non-print, and multimodal works proficiently and critically to be media literate.

WRITING CCS

  • W.7.4 – Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

  • W.7.5 – With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on hwo well purpose and audience have been addressed.

  • W.7.10 – Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes and audiences.

  • W – Anchor 11 – Create – both independently and collaboratively – technical, non-print, digital, and multimodal versions of text types and purposes outlined in standards 1,2, and 3.

  • W – Anchor 12 – Strengthen writing craft – both independently and collaboratively – through a recursive writing and revision process and the use of the common vocabulary of the 6 Trait model.

LANGUAGE CCS

  • L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  • L.7.2 – Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

  • L.7.3 – Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

  • L.7.4B – Use common, grade appropriate Greek or Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of the word

  • L.7.6 – Acquire and use accurately grade appropriate general academic and domain specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

SPEAKING AND LISTENING CCCS

  • SL.7.1 – Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

  • SL.7.1A Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.

  • SL.7.1B Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed

  • SL.7.C Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others’ questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.

  • SL.7.D Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

  • SL.7.6 – Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Additionally, the CCS mapped out below are not intended to be used exclusively in the quarter they are identified in. This is merely a guideline to ensure each is addressed specifically. Frequently they will be applicable in additional units/lessons.
7th GRADE ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS

Introductory Unit-Power of Ideas
Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks
Textbook References: Selections from McDougal Littell Literature 7

Literature Genres Workshop, Reading Strategies Workshop and Writing Process Workshop (pgs. 2-19)


Content Outline:


  • Classroom Introduction

      1. o Rules

o Expectations

o Overview of the Year


  • Textbook Introduction

  • Basic Sentence Writing (SIMS)

Core Standards to be Emphasized:



Standards for Literature (RL)
RL.7.1-Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.2-Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

RL.7.3-Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters of plot.)
Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)
RI.7.1-Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.5-Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.



Writing Standards (W)
none

Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)
SL.7.1-Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-lead) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Language Standards (L)
L.7.4d-Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
Unit Vocabulary:

Genres


Non-fiction/Information text

Types of Media

Strategies for Active Readers

Writing Process

Drama

Poetry
Suggested Activities:



Class discussions

Taking notes

Compare/contrast fiction to non-fiction

Readers Notebooks

Summarize the writing process


Assessment Recommendations:


  • Textbook Resource Manager

Unit #1:Weaving a Story


Suggested Time Frame: 4 Weeks
Textbook References: from McDougal Littell Literature

“Seventh Grade” by Gary Soto

“The Last Dog” by Katherine Paterson

“Thank You, M’am” by Langston Hughes

“Rikki-tikki-tavi” by Rudyard Kipling

“Exploring the Titanic” by Robert Ballard (informational text)

“An American Childhood” by Annie Dillard

“Casey at Bat” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer

The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street”(Twilight Zone episode) by Rod Sterling

“Back to the Future”- Media Study

“The Unnatural Course of Time”- Reading for Information/Movie Review

Writing Workshop-Descriptive Essay



Content Outline:




Core Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)
RL.7.1-Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.3- Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters of plot.)

RL.7.9-Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.
Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)
RI.7.2-Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.7.3-Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4.- Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.
Writing Standards (W)
W.7.2- Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.2a-Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

W.7.2b Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples.

W.7.2c Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

W.7.2d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.

W.7.2e Establish and maintain a formal style.

W.7.2f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year



Language Standards (L)

L.7.1B Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.

L.7.4A Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence or paragraph; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

L.7.4D Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).




Critical Vocabulary:


  • Vocabulary given as introduction to each selection

  • Plot

  • Conflict

  • Setting

  • Text Structure- Comp./Contrast, Sequence, Cause/Effect

  • Inferences

  • Writer’s position

Suggested Activities:


  • Compare/contrast a story to a movie (Monsters Due on Maple Street or Rikki Tikki Tavi.

  • Review all the types of Text structure

  • Review Plot line and show different ways to do the plot line

  • Use of picture books


Assessment Recommendations:


  • Assessment Practice-Reading Comprehension(pgs. 166-171)




  • Essay writing

  • Unit 1 test

  • Individual tests for each story

  • Short written response

Unit #2: Personality Tests
Suggested Time Frame: 4 week
Textbook References: from McDougal Littell Literature
Reader’s Workshop

“Zebra” by Chaim Potok

“The Rider” by Noami Shihab Nye

“The Collected Grief of a Nation” by Judith Weinraub (informational text)

“Mother’s Words” by Eleanor Wimbish (informational text)

“The Scholarship Jacket” by Marta Salinas

“Retrieved Reformation” by O.Henry

“The Three-Century Woman” by Richard Peck

“Charles” by Shirley Jackson

“Encounter with Martin Luther King Jr. by Maya Angelou

“Dirk the Protector” by Gary Paulsen

“It Was a Long Time Before” by Leslie Marmon Silko

“Abuelito Who” by Sandra Cisneros

Writing Workshop Comparison/contrast Essay



Content Outline:


  • Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 173A-175


Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)

RL.7.6. Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text.


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.7. Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).


RI.7.9. Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.
Writing Standards (W)

See above: Standards W.7.4-5 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year



Language Standards (L)

L.7.5.C Distinguish among the connotations (associations) of words with similar denotations (definitions) (e.g., refined, respectful, polite, diplomatic, condescending).




Unit Vocabulary:
Character traits

Characterization

Point of view

Inferences

Context Clues

Genres


Figurative Language

Suggested Activities:
Conduct an interview

Close Reading

Draw pictures of idioms

Analyze a character

Create a Cause/Effect Chain

Web diagram

YouTube Video of Vietnam War Memorial

Vietnam War Memorial Website

Martin Luther King “I Have a Dream” speech video

Assessment Recommendations:
Assessment Practice (pgs. 294-299)

Unit #3: Lessons to Learn



Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks

Textbook References:

From McDougal Littell Literature

Reader’s Workshop: Understanding theme

“Amigo Brothers” by Piari Thomas (short story)

“The War of the Wall” by Toni Cade Bambara (short story)

“What Do Fish Have to Do with Anything” by Avi (short story)

“Homeless” (problem-solution essay)

“A Crush” by Cynthia Rylant (short story)

“Great Reads: from the Giver by Lois Lowry (fantasy novel)

“Spring Harvest of Snow Peas/Eating Alone by Maxine Hong Kingston (poems)

“A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens (drama)

“Media Study: from a Christmas Carol”

“Writing Workshop: Short Story”

Readers Workshop



Content Outline:

  • Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 301A-303


Core Standards to be Emphasized:
Standards for Literature (RL)

RL.7.7. Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.5. Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.


Writing Standards (W)

See above: Standards W.7.4-5 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Language Standards (L)

L.7.5.B Use the relationship between particular words (e.g., synonym/antonym, analogy) to better understand each of the words.



Unit Vocabulary:

Topic


Theme

Symbol


Cause and effect

Sequence


Inference

Compare and contrast

Clauses

Suggested Activities:

Compare and contrast diagram

Draw a picture of idioms

Identify themes in songs

Analyze a character

Author’s perspective chart


Act out play

Compare and contrast video to story



Assessment Recommendations:

Assessment page 428-433

End of each section test

Unit #4: Finding a Voice



Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks
Textbook References:
From McDougal Littell Literature

Reader’s Workshop: Mood, Tone, and Style

“Dark They Were, and Golden-Eyed” by Ray Bradbury (science fiction)

“A Day’s Wait” by Ernest Hemingway (short story)

“How Hemingway Wrote” by Bruce Rettman (informative article)

“The People Could Fly” by Virginia Hamilton (folk tale)

Great Reads: from “Out of the Dust” by Karen Hesse (novel)

“The Only Girl in the World for Me” by Bill Cosby (essay)

“Breaking the Ice” by Dave Barry (essay)

“One Perfect Rose” / “Song for an April Dusk” by Dorothy Parker (poems)

“maggie and milly and molly and may” / “who are you, little i” / “old age sticks” by E. E. Cummings (poems)

Media Study: Style and Mood in Photographs (image collections)

Writing Workshop: Interpretive Essay


Content Outline:



  • Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 435A-437


Core Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)

RL.7.7. Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.


Writing Standards (W)

W.7.3D Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.


 W.7.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Language Standards (L)

L.7.1B Choose among simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships among ideas.

L.7.2A Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives (e.g., It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but not He wore an old[,] green shirt).

L.7.4D Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).

 L.7.5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
Unit Vocabulary:
Mood

Tone


Style

Monitor


Summarize

Subject-verb agreement

Fact

Opinion


Synonyms

Literal and figurative meaning


Suggested Activities:
Analyze style in photographs

Create a visual that represents the idea of a certain mood

Produce and edit a video

Write a set of instructions for a task

Web diagram

Compare and contrast different styles in poetry


Assessment Recommendations:
Assessment Practice (pgs. 532-537)

Unit #5: Picture the Moment

Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks

Textbook References:

From McDougal Littell Literature



Reader’s Workshop: Appreciating Poetry

“A Minor Bird” by Robert Frost

“Under the Back Porch” by Virginia Hamilton

“A word is dead” by Emily Dickinson

“Cynthia in the Snow” by Gwendolyn Brooks

“The Courage That My Mother Had” by Edna St. Vincent Millay

“The Names” by Billy Collins

“Enemies Attack: A Nation Mourns” (Article)

“the earth is a living thing” by Lucille Clifton

“Sleeping in the Forest” by Mary Oliver

“Gold” by Pat Mora

“Scaffolding” by Seamus Heaney

“The World Is Not a Pleasant Place to Be” Nikki Giovanni

“Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe

“The Charge of the Light Brigade” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

“The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes

“Two Haiku” by Matsuo Basho

“Fireflies” by Paul Fleischman

“Fireflies in the Garden” by Robert Frost

“Stars with Wings” (Science Article)

“Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll

“Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” by Shel Silverstein

“Two Limericks” by Edward Lear

“The Delight Song of Tsoai-Talee” by N. Scott Momaday

“Four Skinny Trees” by Sandara Cisneros

“Ode to enchanted light” by Pablo Neruda

“Snow in the Suburbs” by Thomas Hardy

Writing Workshop: Personal Response to a Poem

Content Outline:


  • Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 539A-541

Core Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)

 RL.7.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds (e.g., alliteration) on a specific verse or stanza of a poem or section of a story or drama.

RL.7.5.. Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.


Writing Standards (W)

See above: Standards W.7.4-5 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year



Language Standards (L)

See above: Standards L.7.1-3,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year



Unit Vocabulary:

  • Imagery

  • Figurative Language

  • Sound Devices

  • Form

  • Personal Response

  • Connotation

  • Poetic Genres

  • Meter

  • Symbolism

  • Historical Context

Suggested Activities:

Give an oral interpretation of a poem Videos/Web Activities on 9/11

Analyze a poem Go out and write a poem in nature

Write a poem Song lyric poems

Slam poetry competition Research the Legendary Light

Coffee house reading Brigade

Make holiday cards Investigate non-sense language

Draw the images of the poem Personal response to a poem

View interpretations of the Jabberwocky poem

Identifying figurative language

Jeopardy review of poetry vocabulary

Diagram the poem



Assessment Recommendations:

Assessment Practice (pgs. 616-621)

Written analysis of a poem

Write a poem to demonstrate understanding

Vocabulary quiz

Selected text quizzes

End of unit assessment

Unit #6: Sharing Our Stories



Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks
Textbook References:
From McDougal Littell Literature

“Echo” by Alice Low (Myth)

“Prometheus” by Bernard Evslin (Myth)

“Orpheus and Eurydice” by Olivia Coolidge (Myth)

“Song of Orpheus” by William Shakespeare (Poem)

“Icarus and Daedalus” by Josephine Preston Peabody (Myth)

“Phaethon, Son of Apollo” by Olivia Coolidge (Myth)

“Young Arthur” by Robert D. San Souci (Legend)

“Who was King Arthur” (Magazine Article)

“Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” Michael Morpurgo (Legend)

“Crispin: The Cross of Lead” by Avi (Historical Fiction)

“Serf on the Sun” (Book Review)

“Medieval Adventures” (Book Review)

“Brer Possum’s Dilemma” by Jackie Torrence (Folk Tale)

“Waters of Gold” by Laurence Yep (Folk Tale)

“Sally Ann Thunder Ann Whirlwind” by Mary Pope Osborne (Tall Tale)

“Two Ways to Count to Ten” by Frances Carpenter (Fable)

“The Race Between Toad and Donkey” by Roger D. Abrahams (Fable)

Writing Workshop: Cause and Effect Essay

Speaking and Listening: Formal Presentation

“The King Who Wished for Gold” by Anne Rockwell (Myth)

“The Three Wishes” by Richardo E. Alegria (Folk Tale)




Content Outline:
Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 623A-625
Core Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)

RI.7.9. Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

See above: Standard RI.7.10 addressed in each unit throughout the year




Writing Standards (W)

W.7.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

W.7.3A Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

W.7.3B Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

W.7.3C Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one time frame or setting to another.

W.7.3E Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events.


Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

SL.7.5. Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to clarify claims and findings and emphasize salient points.


Language Standards (L)

L.7.1A Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.

L.7.1C Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.

 L.7.4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.



L.7.4C Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

L.7.5A Interpret figures of speech (e.g., literary, biblical, and mythological allusions) in context



Unit Vocabulary:
Myth Universal Theme

Legend Compound Sentences

Folk Tale Complex Sentences

Tall Tale Homograph


Suggested Activities:

Mythology Research/PowerPoint/Prezi

Write your own (myth, legend, tall tale)

Readers’ Theater

Skit

Comic strip



Character on trial
Assessment Recommendations:
Unit 6 Test

Narrative Writing

Formal Presentation

Unit #7: Writing a Life



Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks
Textbook References:
From McDougal Littell Literature
“Eleanor Roosevelt” by William Jay Jacobs (Informational Text)

“A First Lady Speaks Out” letter (Information Text)

“The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt” by Eleonor Roosevelt (Informational Text)

“Names/Nombres” by Julia Alvarez

“from It’s Not About the Bike” by Lance Armstrong(Informational Text)

“from 23 Days in July” by John Wilcockson(Informational Text)

“The Noble Experiment” by Alfred Duckett(Informational Text)

“Jackie Robinson Makes Headlines” (Informational Text)

“Robinson Steals Home in Fifth” by Roscoe McGowen (Informational Text)

Media Study-Jackie Robinson

“Lucy Stone: Champion of Women’s Rights” by Claire Boiko

“My Mother Enters the Work Force” by Rita Dove

“Washington Monument by Night” by Carl Sandburg

Writing Workshop



Content Outline:


  • Preview Unit Goals in Teacher’s Edition of textbook, pages 751A-753

Core Standards to be Emphasized:
Standards for Literature (RL)

See above: Standards RL.7.1,10 addressed in each unit


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.3. Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.



Writing Standards (W)

W.7.6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and link to and cite sources as well as to interact and collaborate with others, including linking to and citing sources.

W.7.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions for further research and investigation.
Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

See above: Standards SL.7.1,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year


Language Standards (L)

See above: Standards L.7.1-3,6 addressed in each unit throughout the year




Unit Vocabulary:
Biography Historical Drama

Autobiography Primary Source

Personal Essay Personal Narrative

Summarize Chronological Order

Make Inferences Draw Conclusions

Point of view



Suggested Activities:
Write a personal narrative

Punctuate titles with italics and quotation marks

Present a Personal Narrative

Analyze a documentary

Plan and conduct an interview

Story summary

Compare/contrast famous characters

Assessment Recommendations:
Personal Essay

Formal Presentation

Assessment Practice-Reading Comprehension (pgs. 858-863)

Unit 7 test

Resource Manager for the unit

Unit #8: Face the Facts and class novel
Suggested Time Frame: 4 weeks
Textbook References from: McDougal Littell Literature

“What Do You Know About Sharks?” by Sharon Guynup (Magazine Article)

“Great White Sharks” by Peter Benchley (Magazine Article)

“Little Black Smoke: The Black Death’s Journey” by Diana Childress (Magazine Article)

“The World Turned Upside Down: How the Death Affected Europe” by Mary Morton Cowan (Magazine Article)

“News Reports” (Media Study)

“Why Work Out?” by Erica Cheng (Magazine Article)

“The Promise” by Jane Goodall (Essay)

“Pro Athletes’ Salaries Aren’t Overly Exorbitant” by Mark Singletary (Editorial)

“Do Professional Athletes Get Paid Too Much?” by Justin Hjelm (Editorial)

“Why We Shouldn’t Go to Mars” by Gregg Easterbrook (Magazine Article)

“Remarks at the Dedication of the Aerospace Medical Health Center” by John F. Kennedy (Speech)

“Persuasive Techniques in Commercials (Media Study – TV Commericals)
Writing Workshop – Persuasive Essay
Content Outline: (Teacher’s Edition)

Preview T15, Pages 864A & 865B, 867

Core Standards to be Emphasized:

Standards for Literature (RL)

RL.7.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.


Reading Standards for Informational Text (RI)

RI.7.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2. Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

RI.7.7. Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

RI.7.8. Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

RI.7.9. Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.

RI.7.10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 6–8 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Writing Standards (W)

W.7.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.1.a. Introduce claim(s), acknowledge alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically.

W.7.1.b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant evidence, using accurate, credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.

W.7.1.c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), reasons, and evidence.

W.7.1.E Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.

W.7.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Speaking and Listening Standards (SL)

SL.7.2. Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

 SL.7.3. Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

SL.7.4. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.


Language Standards (L)

L.7.1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking

 L.7.1.a. Explain the function of phrases and clauses in general and their function in specific sentences.

L.7.1.c. Place phrases and clauses within a sentence, recognizing and correcting misplaced and dangling modifiers.



 L.7.4.c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning or its part of speech.

Unit 8 Vocabulary:

  • Vocabulary given as introduction to each selection

  • Fact

  • Opinion

  • Text features

  • Argument

  • Persuasive techniques

  • Reasoning

  • Context clues

  • Idioms


Assessment Recommendations:

  • Assessment Practice – Reading Comprehension pg. 956-961 (end of selections; item analysis pg 957)

  • Essay Writing - rubrics

  • Unit 8 test

  • Conferencing

  • Critical Thinking Class Checklist (levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy)

  • Performance Assessment

  • Graphic Organizer

  • Self-Assessment / Peer Assessment - Checklists




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