6. 4 (United states and new jersey history) all students will demonstrate knowledge of united states and new jersey history in order to understand life and events in the past and how they relate to the present and future. Grade 8



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New Jersey Department of Education

2006 Social Studies Standards Implementation Guide (SIG)




6.4 (UNITED STATES AND NEW JERSEY HISTORY) ALL STUDENTS WILL DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE OF UNITED STATES AND NEW JERSEY HISTORY IN ORDER TO UNDERSTAND LIFE AND EVENTS IN THE PAST AND HOW THEY RELATE TO THE PRESENT AND FUTURE.
Grade 8

6.4.8.C. Many Worlds Meet (to 1620)

    1. Discuss factors that stimulated European overseas explorations between the 15th and 17th centuries and the impact of that exploration on the modern world.

    2. Trace the major land and water routes of the explorers.

    3. Compare the political, social, economic, and religious systems of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492 (e.g., civic values, population levels, family structure, communication, use of natural resources).

    4. Discuss the characteristics of the Spanish and Portuguese exploration and conquest of the Americas, including Spanish interaction with the Incan and Aztec empires, expeditions in the American Southwest, and the social composition of early settlers and their motives for exploration and conquest.

    5. Describe the migration of the ancestors of the Lenape Indians and their culture at the time of first contact with Europeans.

    6. Compare and contrast historic Native American groups of the West, Southwest, Northwest, Arctic and sub-Arctic, Great Plains, and Eastern Woodland regions at the beginning of European exploration.

    7. Analyze the cultures and interactions of peoples in the Americas, Western Europe, and Africa after 1450 including the transatlantic slave trade.

    8. Discuss how millions of Africans, brought against their will from Central Africa to the Americas, including Brazil, Caribbean nations, North America and other destinations, retained their humanity, their families, and their cultures during enslavement.




Author Information:
Author: John Boland

District: Point Pleasant Beach School District


Framework97 References
Important American Documents, pp.40-42

Patriotism and Love of Country – American Symbols, pp.43-46

How Art and Literature Influence Society and Are Influence by Society, pp.88-89


National History Standard
4C: The student understands historic figures who have exemplified values and principles of American democracy. 

4D: The student understands events that celebrate and exemplify fundamental values and principles of American democracy. 

4E: The student understands national symbols through which American values and principles are expressed. 


Content Overview
This section covers some important historical figures in the early American history. The significance of key national holidays along with important national symbols is addressed, as is the importance of national monuments and landmarks of the American heritage.


Essential Questions
Who or what is an important historical figure at any time in any nation or territory?

Who are the Americans we consider great in US history?

What are the attributes of historical heroic figures in American history?

Who are notable women (e.g. Susan B Anthony and Clara Barton) who have contributed to development of American history? Why are the contributions important?

Who are notable African Americans (e.g. Harriet Tubman, Fredrick Douglas and George Washington Carver) who have contributed to development of American history? Why are the contributions important?

Who are notable Native Americans (e.g. Sacagawea and Squanto) who have contributed to development of American history? What are the contributions?




Teaching Resources

Educator’s Desk Reference: http://www.eduref.org/cgi-bin/lessons.cgi/Social_Studies



National Archives & Records Administration: http://www.archives.gov/

www.whitehouse.gov/history/africanamerican The President’s Black History Month website.

www.afroam.history.about.com A free newsletter on African-American history.

www.aaregistry.com A registry regularly updated of African-American achievements.

Assessment
Using the African American registry website above, students compile a timeline for the first specific era (see NJ history standards) of American history. The timeline of the era should integrate major events in American history with major events in African-American history to prove the thesis that “African-American history and American history are the same subject.”



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