5th Grade Summaries Theme 3 And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? Summary 1



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5th Grade Summaries Theme 3


And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?
Summary 1:

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? tells the story of Paul Revere and his famous ride on April 18, 1775, the beginning of the Revolutionary War.

Revere and his family lived in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a silversmith, a church bell ringer, and a dentist. Then he joined the Sons of Liberty to protest British laws and became an express rider, spreading news between Boston and Philadelphia. He was also a secret agent, trying to find out the plans of British soldiers in Boston.

On the night of April 18, the British began a march to the towns of Lexington and Concord. Revere’s job was to warn people to defend themselves. He had to tell Patriot leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams, too.

Revere saw the signal, two lanterns in church steeple, that meant the British were sailing across the harbor. He rowed across the Charles River to where a horse was waiting and began his famous ride. He galloped along the Lexington road, waking people up by shouting and banging on their doors.

At one point, six English officers arrested Revere, but later they let him go, without his horse. Revere walked back to Lexington, where he found Hancock and Adams. About fifty farmers had gathered to take a stand against the British. The British troops arrived. A battle began. The battles of Lexington and Concord were the first in the Revolutionary War.

At the end of the war Revere went back to being a silversmith and opened and hardware store. He also made church bells. But he will always be remembered for his Big Ride.



Poem: Taxes

Colonists, colonists,

What do you think?

There is a tax on paper

And a tax on ink!

There is a tax on glass and a tax on tea!

There are too many taxes for you and me!
Colonists, colonists,

What do you say?

TOO MANY TAXES!

WE WON’T PAY!




Summary 2:

America’s Revolutionary War began on the night of April 18, 1775. That was the night when Paul Revere mad his famous ride. And Then What Happened, Paul Revere? is the true story of Revere’s ride.

Paul Revere and his family lived in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a silversmith, a church bell ringer, and a dentist. He was also a secret agent who spied on the British.

On the night of April 18, 1775, Revere saw two lanterns in a church steeple. That was the signal he had been waiting for. It meant the British were sailing across the harbor and would march to the towns of Lexington and Concord. Revere’s job was to warn people to defend themselves. He had to tell Patriot leaders John Hancock and Samuel Adams, too.

Revere rowed across the Charles River. A horse was waiting for him on the other side. He galloped along the Lexington road. In Lexington, Paul Revere found Hancock and Adams. Fifty farmers were there too. They were ready to fight the British. The battles of Lexington and Concord were the first in the Revolutionary War.

At the end of the war, Revere went back to being a silversmith. He also made church bells. But he will always be remembered for his famous ride.




Katie’s Trunk
Summary 1:

Katie’s Trunk tells about the family of Katie Gray at the beginning of the American Revolution. Katie’s parents are Tories; they support the British king. Katie’s family has lost rebel friends who are against the British. Her friend Celia Warren doesn’t speak to her anymore.

One day, Katie’s father comes running to tell his family to get out of the house and hide. The rebels are coming. Scared, they run into the woods. Katie feels like a trapped animal. Then she gets so angry the she runs back into the house. She doesn’t want anyone to damage the house or the thing in it.

Katie runs into here parents’ room and hides in her mother’s wedding trunk under a pile of clothes. She can hear footsteps and doors slamming. She hears the rebels throwing things on the floor and Celia Warren’s father telling the others to look for money.

Katie can hardly breathe inside the trunk. Then Mr. Warren opens the lid. She breathes in the fresh air. The dresses on top of Katie move, and she feels Mr. Warren’s hand. Katie wants to scream, but she knows she must keep quiet. After touching her, Mr. Warren shouts to the others that the Tories are coming and that they should leave the house. He leaves the trunk lip open.

Katie comes out of the trunk and begins to cry. Her family runs inside. Her mother hugs but is angry that she ran back into the house. Katie knows that Mr. Warren called the others away to keep her safe, leaving the lid open for her to breathe. She believes that there is still some goodness in her neighbors, even with the war beginning.

Poem: My Neighbors and I

My neighbors and I all share the land.

We help each other as much as we can.
But when each one of us think is right

Can be as different as day and night.


Will we let our differences divide us,

Or will we be guided by the good inside us?



Summary 2:

Katie’s Trunk takes place at the start of the American Revolution. Katie’s parents are Tories. They support the English king. But some of Katie’s friends are against the English. Katie is caught in the middle.

One day, some American rebels come to Katie’s house. Katie and her family are afraid. They hide in the woods. But Katie goes back. She doesn’t want the rebels to damage the house or the things in it.

Katie hides in her mother’s wedding trunk under a pile of clothes. She can hear footsteps and doors slamming. She also hears a familiar voice. It belongs to Mr. Warren. He is the father of her good friend Celia. Mr. Warren tells the rebels where to look for money.

Katie can hardly breathe in the trunk. Then Mr. Warren opens the lid. She feels his hand on the dresses that cover her. She stays very quiet. Mr. Warren orders the others to leave. He says the family is returning. He keeps the trunk lid open and leaves wit the men.

Katie steps out of the trunk. She is safe. Katie knows that Mr. Warren left the lid open so she could breathe. She believes that there is still some goodness in her neighbors, even in a time of war.


James Forten
Summary1:

James Forten is a biography of James Forten, a sailor at the end of the American Revolution and a sailmaker and fighter against slavery afterwards. Forten lived in Philadelphia, home to hundreds of free African Americans and abolitionist groups, including Quakers, who wanted to end slavery. He went to a school that a Quaker founded for African American children.

Forten wanted to join the fight for American’s freedom. In 1781, at age fourteen, he went to sea. His job was to bring gunpowder up from below deck during battles. In his second battle, Forten’s ship, the Royal Louise, was trapped by three British ships. The Royal Louise surrendered. Its crew was taken aboard the British ship, the Amphyon. Forten was afraid that he would be sent to the West Indies and sold into slavery.

The son of the captain of the Amphyon joined the American boys in a game of marbles and befriended Forten. Instead of going to the West Indies, Forten was sent to the British prison ship, the Jersey. He felt that his friendship with the captain’s son saved him from slavery.

Life for the prisoners was awful on the Jersey, but in two weeks, news arrived that the British army had surrendered to George Washington, ending the war. Washington did not approve of sending prisoners to the West Indies. This news, not the game of marbles, is what probably saved Forten from life as a slave.

After the war, Forten went into the sailmaking business where his father had worked. He took over that business and became one of the richest men in Philadelphia. He also became an important abolitionist, speaking out against slavery.

Poem: The Docks

I went to the waterfront docks one day

To see what I could see.

I saw a row of beautiful ships

As tall as they could be.
There were fighting ships – privateers –

They were filled with brave young men,

Who were ready to fight against British rule,

And I signed up with them.



Summary 2:

James Forten was an African American who fought in the American Revolution and worked hard to end slavery. The true story of his life is told in the selection James Forten. He grew up in Philadelphia, where many free African Americans lived. The city was also the home of abolitionist groups who fought against slavery.

At age fourteen, James became a sailor. During battles against British ships, he carried gunpowder from below deck. In his second battle, three British ships trapped his ship. James and the rest of the crew were taken aboard one of the ships. He was afraid the British would sell him as a slave.

James became friends with the son of the ship’s captain. Luckily, James did not become a slave. Instead, he was sent to a prison ship. He believed that his friendship with the captain’s son saved him from slavery.



Two weeks later, the British army surrendered to George Washington. The war was over. James was a free man once again. He returned to Philadelphia and became a successful sailmaker. James also spoke out against slavery and became an important abolitionist.


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