567—41. 5 (455B) Organic chemicals



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567—41.5 (455B) Organic chemicals.

41.5(1) MCLs and other requirements for organic chemicals. Maximum contaminant levels for two classes of organic chemical contaminants specified in 41.5(1)“b” apply to community water systems and nontransient noncommunity water systems as specified herein. The two referenced organic chemical classes are volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and synthetic organic chemicals (SOCs).

The requirements also contain analytical method requirements and monitoring requirements referenced in 41.5(1)“b” and “c.” Best available technology (BAT) for control of these organic contaminants is referenced in 567—paragraph 43.3(10)“a.”

a. Applicability. The maximum contaminant levels for volatile and synthetic organic contaminants apply to community and nontransient noncommunity water systems. Compliance with the volatile and synthetic organic contaminant maximum contaminant level is calculated pursuant to 41.5(1)“b.”

b. Maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and analytical methodology for organic compounds. The maximum contaminant levels for organic chemicals are listed in the table in subparagraph 41.5(1)“b”(1). Analyses for the contaminants in this subrule shall be conducted using the following methods, or their equivalent as approved by EPA.

(1) Table:

ORGANIC CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS, CODES, MCLS, ANALYTICAL METHODS,

AND DETECTION LIMITS


Contaminant

EPA Contaminant Code

MCL (mg/L)

Methodology1

Detection Limit (mg/L)

Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs):

Benzene

2990

0.005

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Carbon tetrachloride

2982

0.005

502.2, 524.2, 551.1

0.0005

Chlorobenzene (mono)

2989

0.1

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,2-Dichlorobenzene (ortho)

2968

0.6

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,4-Dichlorobenzene (para)

2969

0.075

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,2-Dichloroethane

2980

0.005

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,1-Dichloroethylene

2977

0.007

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

2380

0.07

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene

2979

0.1

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Dichloromethane

2964

0.005

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,2-Dichloropropane

2983*

0.005

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Ethylbenzene

2992

0.7

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Styrene

2996

0.1

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Tetrachloroethylene

2987

0.005

502.2, 524.2, 551.1

0.0005

Toluene

2991

1

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,1,1-Trichloroethane

2981

0.2

502.2, 524.2, 551.1

0.0005

Trichloroethylene

2984

0.005

502.2, 524.2, 551.1

0.0005

1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene

2378

0.07

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

1,1,2-Trichloroethane

2985

0.005

502.2, 524.2, 551.1

0.0005

Vinyl chloride

2976

0.002

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Xylenes (total)

2955*

10

502.2, 524.2

0.0005

Synthetic Organic Chemicals (SOCs):

Alachlor3

2051

0.002

505, 507, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.0002

Aldicarb

2047

0.003

531.1, 6610

0.0005

Aldicarb sulfone

2044

0.002

531.1, 6610

0.0008

Aldicarb sulfoxide

2043

0.004

531.1, 6610

0.0005

Atrazine3

2050

0.003

505, 507, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1, Syngenta AG-625

0.0001

Benzo(a)pyrene

2306

0.0002

525.2, 550, 550.1

0.00002

Carbofuran

2046

0.04

531.1, 531.2, 6610

0.0009

Chlordane3

2959

0.002

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2

0.0002

2,4-D6 (as acids, salts, and esters)

2105

0.07

515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, 555, D5317-93

0.0001

Dalapon

2031

0.2

515.1, 515.3, 515.4, 552.1, 552.2

0.001

1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP)

2931

0.0002

504.1, 551.1

0.00002

Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate

2035

0.4

506, 525.2

0.0006

Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate

2039

0.006

506, 525.2

0.0006

Dinoseb6

2041

0.007

515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, 555

0.0002

Diquat

2032

0.02

549.2

0.0004

Endothall

2033

0.1

548.1

0.009

Endrin3

2005

0.002

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.00001

Ethylene dibromide (EDB)

2946

0.00005

504.1, 551.1

0.00001

Glyphosate

2034

0.7

547, 6651

0.006

Heptachlor3

2065

0.0004

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.00004

Heptachlor epoxide3

2067

0.0002

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.00002

Hexachlorobenzene3

2274

0.001

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.0001

Hexachlorocyclopentadiene3

2042

0.05

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.0001

Lindane (gamma BHC)3

2010

0.0002

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.00002

Methoxychlor3

2015

0.04

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.0001

Oxamyl

2036

0.2

531.1, 531.2, 6610

0.002

Pentachlorophenol

2326

0.001

515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, 525.2, 555, D5317-93

0.00004

Picloram3,6

2040

0.5

515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, 555, D5317-93

0.0001

Polychlorinated biphenyls4

(as decachlorobiphenyl)

(as Arochlors)3

2383

0.0005

508A

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2

0.0001

Simazine3

2037

0.004

505, 507, 508.1, 525.2, 551.1

0.00007

2,3,7,8-TCDD (dioxin)

2063

3x10-8

1613

5x10-9

2,4,5-TP6 (Silvex)

2110

0.05

515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, 555, D5317-93

0.0002

Toxaphene3

2020

0.003

505, 508, 508.1, 525.2

0.001

*As of January 1, 1999, the contaminant codes for the following compounds were changed from the Iowa Contaminant Code to the EPA Contaminant Code:


Contaminant

Iowa Contaminant Code (Old)

EPA Contaminant Code (New)

1,2 Dichloropropane

2325

2983

Xylenes (total)

2974

2955

1Analyses for the contaminants in this section shall be conducted using the following EPA methods or their equivalent as approved by EPA. This incorporation by reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. Copies may be inspected at EPA’s Drinking Water Docket, EPA West, 1301 Constitution Avenue NW, Room B102, Washington, DC 20460 (telephone: (202) 566-2426); or at the Office of the Federal Register, 800 North Capitol Street NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC.

The following methods are available from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161 (telephone: (800)553-6847).

Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water, EPA-600/4-88-039, December 1988, Revised July 1991 (NTIS PB91-231480): Methods 508A and 515.1.

Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water—Supplement I, EPA-600/4-90-020, July 1990 (NTIS PB91-146027): Methods 547, 550, 550.1.

Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water—Supplement II, EPA-600/R-92-129, August 1992 (NTIS PB92-207703): Methods 548.1, 552.1, 555.

Methods for the Determination of Organic Compounds in Drinking Water—Supplement III, EPA-600/R-95-131, August 1995 (NTIS PB95-261616): Methods 502.2, 504.1, 505, 506, 507, 508, 508.1, 515.2, 524.2, 525.2, 531.1, 551.1, 552.2.

Method 1613 “Tetra-through Octa-Chlorinated Dioxins and Furans by Isotope-Dilution HRGC/HRMS,” EPA-821-B-94-005, October 1994 (NTIS PB95-104774).

The following American Public Health Association (APHA) documents are available from APHA, 1015 Fifteenth Street NW, Washington, DC 20005.

Supplement to the 18th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 1994, Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 19th edition, 1995, or 20th edition, 1998 (any of the three editions may be used), APHA: Method 6610.

Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 18th edition, 1992, 19th edition, 1995, or 20th edition, 1998, (any of the three editions may be used), APHA: Method 6651.

The following American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) method is available from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428.

Annual book of ASTM Standards, 1999, Vol. 11.02 (or any edition published after 1993), ASTM: D5317-93.

Methods 515.3 and 549.2 are available from U.S. EPA NERL, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268.

Method 515.4, “Determination of Chlorinated Acids in Drinking Water by Liquid-Liquid Microextraction, Derivatization and Fast Gas Chromatography with Electron Capture Detection,” Revision 1.0, April 2000, EPA 815/B-00/001, available at www.epa.gov/safewater/methods/sourcalt.html.

Method 531.2, “Measurement of n-Methylcarbamoyloximes and n-Methylcarbamates in Water by Direct Aqueous Injection HPLC with Photocol-umn Derivatization,” Revision 1.0, September 2001, EPA 815/B-01/002, available at www.epa.gov/safewater/methods/sourcalt.html.

Syngenta AG-625 Method, “Atrazine in Drinking Water by Immunoassay,” February 2001, is available from Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc., 410 Swing Road, P.O. Box 18300, Greensboro, NC 27419, telephone (336)632-6000.

Other required analytical test procedures germane to the conduct of these analyses are contained in Technical Notes on Drinking Water Methods, EPA-600/R-94-173, October 1994 (NTIS PB95-104766).

2Reserved.

3Substitution of the detector specified in Method 505, 507, 508, or 508.1 for the purpose of achieving lower detection limits is allowed as follows. Either an electron capture or nitrogen-phosphorus detector may be used provided all regulatory requirements and quality control criteria are met.

4PCBs are qualitatively identified as Aroclors and measured for compliance purposes as decachlorobiphenyl. Users of Method 505 may have more difficulty in achieving the required detection limits than users of Method 508. 508.1, or 525.2.

5Reserved.

6Accurate determination of the chlorinated esters requires hydrolysis of the sample as described in EPA Methods 515.1, 515.2, 515.3, 515.4, and 555, and ASTM Method D5317-93.

(2) Organic chemical compliance calculations. Compliance with 41.5(1)“b”(1) shall be determined based on the analytical results obtained at each sampling point. If one sampling point is in violation of an MCL listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1), the system is in violation of the MCL. If a system fails to collect the required number of samples, compliance will be based on the total number of samples collected. If a sample result is less than the detection limit, zero will be used when calculating the running annual average. If the system is in violation of an MCL, the water supplier is required to give notice to the department in accordance with 567—subrule 42.4(1) and to notify the public as required by 567—42.1(455B).

1. Systems monitoring more than once per year for VOC or SOC contaminants. For systems which monitor more than once per year, compliance with the MCL is determined by a running annual average of all samples collected at each sampling point.

2. Systems monitoring annually or less frequently for VOC contaminants. Systems which monitor annually or less frequently and whose VOC sample result exceeds the MCL must begin quarterly sampling. The system will not be considered in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly sampling. However, if any sample result will cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL at any sampling point, the system is immediately out of compliance with the MCL.

3. Systems monitoring annually or less frequently for SOC contaminants. Systems which monitor annually or less frequently and whose SOC sample result exceeds the regulatory detection limit specified in subparagraph 41.5(1)“b”(1) must begin quarterly sampling. The system will not be considered in violation of the MCL until it has completed one year of quarterly sampling. However, if any sample result will cause the running annual average to exceed the MCL at any sampling point, the system is immediately out of compliance with the MCL.

(3) Treatment techniques for acrylamide and epichlorohydrin. Each public water supply system must certify annually in writing to the department (using third-party or manufacturer’s certification) that when acrylamide and epichlorohydrin are used in drinking water systems, the combination (or product) of dose and monomer level does not exceed the levels specified as follows:

Acrylamide = 0.05% dosed at 1 ppm (or equivalent)

Epichlorohydrin = 0.01% dosed at 20 ppm (or equivalent)

Certifications can rely on information provided by manufacturers or third parties, as approved by the department.

c. Organic chemical monitoring requirements. Each public water system shall monitor at the time designated within each compliance period. All new systems or systems that use a new source of water must demonstrate compliance with the MCLs within the time period specified by the department. The system must also comply with the initial sampling frequencies specified by the department to ensure the system can demonstrate compliance with the MCLs. A source of water that is determined by the department to be a new source/entry point is considered to be a new source for the purposes of paragraph 41.5(1)“c.” Routine and increased monitoring frequencies shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements in this paragraph.

(1) Routine volatile organic chemical (VOC) monitoring requirements. Beginning on January 1, 1993, community water supplies and NTNC water supplies shall conduct monitoring of the contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) for the purpose of determining compliance with the maximum contaminant level.

(2) VOC monitoring protocol.

1. VOC groundwater monitoring protocol. Groundwater systems shall take a minimum of one sample at every entry point to the distribution system which is representative of each well after treatment (hereafter called a source/entry point). Each sample must be taken at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source, treatment plant, or within the distribution system.

2. VOC surface water monitoring protocol. Surface water systems (and combined surface/groundwater systems) shall take a minimum of one sample at each entry point to the distribution system after treatment (hereafter called a source/entry point). Each sample must be taken at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source, treatment plant, or within the distribution system.

3. Multiple sources. If the system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the system must sample at an entry point to the distribution system during periods of normal operating conditions (i.e., when water representative of all sources is being used). If a representative sample of all water sources cannot be obtained, as determined by the department, separate source/entry points with the appropriate monitoring requirements will be assigned by the department.

4. Initial VOCs monitoring frequency. Each community and nontransient noncommunity water system shall take four consecutive quarterly samples for each contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) during each compliance period, beginning in the initial compliance period. If the initial monitoring for contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) has been completed by December 31, 1992, and the system did not detect any contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1), then each groundwater and surface water system shall take one sample annually beginning with the initial compliance period.

5. Reduced VOC monitoring for groundwater systems. After a minimum of three years of annual sampling, the department may allow groundwater systems with no previous detection of any contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) to take one sample during each compliance period.

6. VOC monitoring waivers. Each community and nontransient noncommunity groundwater system which does not detect a contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) may apply to the department for a waiver from the requirements of 41.5(1)“c”(2)“4” and “5” after completing the initial monitoring. A waiver shall be effective for no more than six years (two compliance periods). The department may also issue waivers to small systems for the initial round of monitoring for 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Detection is defined as greater than or equal to 0.0005 mg/L.

7. Bases of a VOC monitoring waiver. The department may grant a waiver if the department finds that there has not been any knowledge of previous use (including transport, storage, or disposal) of the contaminant within the watershed or zone of influence of the system. If previous use of the contaminant is unknown or it has been used previously, then the following factors shall be used to determine whether a waiver is granted.

● Previous analytical results.

● The proximity of the system to a potential point or nonpoint source of contamination. Point sources include spills and leaks of chemicals at or near a water treatment facility or at manufacturing, distribution, or storage facilities, or from hazardous and municipal waste landfills and other waste handling or treatment facilities.

● The environmental persistence and transport of the contaminants.

● The number of persons served by the public water system and the proximity of a smaller system to a larger system, and

● How well the water source is protected against contamination, such as whether it is a surface or groundwater system. Groundwater systems must consider factors such as depth of the well, the type of soil, and wellhead protection. Surface water systems must consider watershed protection.

8. VOC monitoring waiver requirements for groundwater systems. As a condition of the waiver, a groundwater system must take one sample at each sampling point during the time the waiver is effective (i.e., one sample during two compliance periods or six years) and update its vulnerability assessment considering the factors listed in 41.5(1)“c”(2)“7.” Based on this vulnerability assessment the department must reconfirm that the system is nonvulnerable. If the department does not reconfirm within three years of the initial vulnerability determination, then the waiver is invalidated and the system is required to sample annually as specified in 41.5(1)“c”(2)“4.”

9. VOC monitoring waiver requirements for surface water systems. Each community and nontransient noncommunity surface water system which does not detect a contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) may apply to the department for a waiver from the requirements of 41.5(1)“c”(2)“4” after completing the initial monitoring. Systems meeting this criterion must be determined by the department to be nonvulnerable based on a vulnerability assessment during each compliance period. Each system receiving a waiver shall sample at the frequency specified by the department (if any).

10. Increased VOC monitoring. If a contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) is detected at a level exceeding 0.0005 mg/L in any sample, then:

The system must monitor quarterly at each sampling point which resulted in a detection.

The department may decrease the quarterly monitoring requirement specified in 41.5(1)“c”(2)“4” provided it has determined that the system is reliably and consistently below the maximum contaminant level. In no case shall the department make this determination unless a groundwater system takes a minimum of two quarterly samples and a surface water system takes a minimum of four quarterly samples.

If the department determines that the system is reliably and consistently below the MCL, the department may allow the system to monitor annually. Systems which monitor annually must monitor during the quarter(s) which previously yielded the highest analytical result.

Systems which have three consecutive annual samples with no detection of a contaminant may apply to the department for a waiver as specified in 41.5(1)“c”(2)“6.”

Groundwater systems which have detected one or more of the following two-carbon organic compounds: trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, or 1,1-dichloroethylene shall monitor quarterly for vinyl chloride. A vinyl chloride sample shall be taken at each sampling point at which one or more of the two-carbon organic compounds was detected. If the results of the first analysis do not detect vinyl chloride, the department may reduce the quarterly monitoring frequency of vinyl chloride monitoring to one sample during each compliance period. Surface water systems are required to monitor for vinyl chloride as specified by the department.

11. VOCs reliably and consistently below the MCL. Systems which violate the MCL requirements of 41.5(1)“b”(1) must monitor quarterly. After a minimum of four consecutive quarterly samples which show the system is in compliance and the department determines that the system is reliably and consistently below the maximum contaminant level, the system may monitor at the frequency and times specified in 41.5(1)“c”(2)“10,” third unnumbered paragraph (following approval by the department).

(3) Routine and repeat synthetic organic chemical (SOC) monitoring requirements. Analysis of the synthetic organic contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) for the purposes of determining compliance with the maximum contaminant level shall be conducted as follows:

1. SOC groundwater monitoring protocols. Groundwater systems shall take a minimum of one sample at every entry point to the distribution system which is representative of each well after treatment (hereafter called a source/entry point). Each sample must be taken at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source or treatment plant.

2. SOC surface water monitoring protocols. Surface water systems shall take a minimum of one sample at each entry point to the distribution system after treatment (hereafter called a source/entry point). Each sample must be taken at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source or treatment plant. For purposes of this paragraph, surface water systems include systems with a combination of surface and ground sources.

3. Multiple sources. If the system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the system must sample at an entry point to the distribution system during periods of normal operating conditions (i.e., when water representative of all sources is being used). If a representative sample of all water sources cannot be obtained, as determined by the department, separate source/entry points with the appropriate monitoring requirements will be assigned by the department.

4. SOC monitoring frequency. Community and nontransient noncommunity water systems shall take four consecutive quarterly samples for each contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) during each compliance period beginning with the compliance period starting January 1, 1993. Systems serving more than 3,300 persons which do not detect a contaminant in the initial compliance period may reduce the sampling frequency to a minimum of two quarterly samples in one year during each repeat compliance period. Systems serving less than or equal to 3,300 persons which do not detect a contaminant in the initial compliance period may reduce the sampling frequency to a minimum of one sample during each repeat compliance period.

5. SOC monitoring waivers. Each community and nontransient water system may apply to the department for a waiver from the requirements of 41.5(1)“c”(3)“4.” A system must reapply for a waiver for each compliance period.

6. Bases of an SOC monitoring waiver. The department may grant a waiver if the department finds that there has been no knowledge of previous use (including transport, storage, or disposal) of the contaminant within the watershed or zone of influence of the system. If previous use of the contaminant is unknown or it has been used previously, then the department shall determine whether a waiver may be granted by considering:

● Previous analytical results.

● The proximity of the system to a potential point or nonpoint source of contamination. Point sources include spills and leaks of chemicals at or near a water treatment facility or at manufacturing, distribution, or storage facilities, or from hazardous and municipal waste landfills and other waste handling or treatment facilities. Nonpoint sources include the use of pesticides to control insect and weed pests on agricultural areas, forest lands, home and gardens, and other land application uses.

● The environmental persistence and transport of the pesticide or PCBs.

● How well the water source is protected against contamination due to such factors as depth of the well and the type of soil and the integrity of the well casing.

● Elevated nitrate levels at the water supply source, and

● Use of PCBs in equipment used in the production, storage, or distribution of water (i.e., PCBs used in pumps and transformers).

7. Increased SOC monitoring. If a synthetic organic contaminant listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) is detected in any sample, then:

● Each system must monitor quarterly at each sampling point which resulted in a detection.

● The department may decrease the quarterly SOC monitoring requirement if the system is reliably and consistently below the maximum contaminant level. In no case shall the department make this determination unless a groundwater system takes a minimum of two quarterly samples and a surface water system takes a minimum of four quarterly samples.

● After the department determines the system is reliably and consistently below the maximum contaminant level, the system may monitor annually. Systems which monitor annually must monitor during the quarter that previously yielded the highest analytical result.

● Systems which have three consecutive annual samples with no detection of a contaminant may apply to the department for a waiver as specified in 41.5(1)“c”(3)“6.”

● If monitoring results in detection of one or more of certain related contaminants (aldicarb, aldicarb sulfone, aldicarb sulfoxide, heptachlor, and heptachlor epoxide), then subsequent monitoring shall analyze for all related contaminants.

8. MCL violation and reliably/consistently below the MCL. Systems which violate the requirements of 41.5(1)“b” must monitor quarterly. After a minimum of four quarterly samples show the system is in compliance and the department determines the system is reliably and consistently below the MCL, the system shall monitor at the frequency specified in 41.5(1)“c”(3)“7.”

(4) Organic chemical (SOC and VOC) confirmation samples. The department may require a confirmation sample for positive or negative results. If a confirmation sample is required by the department, the result must be averaged with the first sampling result and the average is used for the compliance determination as specified by 41.5(1)“b”(2). The department has discretion to disregard results of obvious sampling errors from this calculation.

(5) Grandfathered organic chemical (SOC and VOC) data. The department may allow the use of monitoring data collected after January 1, 1988, for VOCs and January 1, 1990, for SOCs required under Section 1445 of the Safe Drinking Water Act for purposes of initial monitoring compliance. If the data are generally consistent with the other requirements in this subparagraph, the department may use such data (i.e., a single sample rather than four quarterly samples) to satisfy the initial monitoring requirement for the initial compliance period beginning January 1, 1993. Systems which use grandfathered samples for VOCs and did not detect any contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) shall begin monitoring annually in accordance with 41.5(1)“c”(2) beginning January 1, 1993.

(6) Increased organic chemical (SOC and VOC) monitoring. The department may increase the required monitoring frequency, where necessary, to detect variations within the system (e.g., fluctuations in concentration due to seasonal use, changes in water source, changes to treatment facilities or normal operation thereof).

(7) Organic chemical (SOC and VOC) vulnerability assessment criteria. Vulnerability of each public water system shall be determined by the department based upon an assessment of the following factors.

1. VOC vulnerability assessment criteria—previous monitoring results. A system will be classified vulnerable if any sample was analyzed to contain one or more contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1)-(VOCs) or 41.5(1)“b”(3) except for trihalomethanes or other demonstrated disinfection by-products.

2. SOC vulnerability assessment criteria—previous monitoring results. A system will be classified vulnerable if any sample was analyzed to contain one or more contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(2)-(SOCs) or 41.5(1)“b”(3) except for trihalomethanes or other demonstrated disinfection by-products.

3. Proximity of surface water supplies to commercial or industrial use, disposal or storage of volatile synthetic organic chemicals. Surface waters which withdraw water directly from reservoirs are considered vulnerable if the drainage basin upgradient and within two miles of the shoreline at the maximum water level contains major transportation facilities such as primary highways or railroads or any of the contaminant sources listed in this subparagraph. Surface water supplies which withdraw water directly from flowing water courses are considered vulnerable if the drainage basin upgradient and within two miles of the water intake structure contains major transportation facilities such as primary highways or railroads or any of the contaminant sources listed in this subparagraph.

4. Proximity of supplies to commercial or industrial use, disposal or storage of volatile synthetic organic chemicals. Wells that are not separated from sources of contamination by at least the following distances will be considered vulnerable.


Sources of Contamination

Shallow Wells as defined

in 567—40.2(455B)

Deep Wells as defined

in 567—40.2(455B)

 

 

 

Sanitary and industrial point discharges

400 ft

400 ft

Mechanical waste treatment plants

400 ft

200 ft

Lagoons

1,000 ft

400 ft

Chemical and storage (aboveground)

200 ft

l00 ft

Chemical and mineral storage including underground storage tanks on or below ground

400 ft

200 ft

Solid waste disposal site

1,000 ft

1,000 ft

5. A system is deemed to be vulnerable for a period of three years after any positive measurement of one or more contaminants listed in 41.5(1)“b”(1) except for trihalomethanes or other demonstrated disinfection by-products.

(8) PCB analytical methodology. Analysis for PCBs shall be conducted using the methods in 41.5(1)“b”(1) and as follows:

1. Each system which monitors for PCBs shall analyze each sample using Method 505, 508, 508.1, or 525.2. Users of Method 505 may have more difficulty in achieving the required Aroclor detection limits than users of Method 508, 508.1, or 525.2.

2. If PCBs (as one of seven Aroclors) are detected in any sample analyzed using Method 505 or 508, the system shall reanalyze the sample using Method 508A to quantitate PCBs as decachlorobiphenyl.

PCB AROCLOR DETECTION LIMITS


Aroclor

Detection Limit (mg/L)

1016

0.00008

1221

0.02

1232

0.0005

1242

0.0003

1248

0.0001

1254

0.0001

1260

0.0002

3. Compliance with the PCB MCL shall be determined based upon the quantitative results of analyses using Method 508A.

d. Best available technology(ies) (BATs). Rescinded IAB 8/11/99, effective 9/15/99.

e. Total trihalomethanes sampling, analytical and other requirements. Rescinded IAB 1/7/04, effective 2/11/04.

f. Analytical procedures—organics. Rescinded IAB 1/7/04, effective 2/11/04.

41.5(2) Organic chemicals occurring as (nontrihalomethane) disinfection by-products. Reserved.

[ARC 9915B, IAB 12/14/11, effective 1/18/12]






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