333 Social Studies Indian Removal Unit



Download 102.09 Kb.
Page1/2
Date conversion25.05.2016
Size102.09 Kb.
  1   2

333 Social Studies

Indian Removal Unit

4/15/2010



WSU

Zachary Erlandson




Unit:

-This unit is aimed at informing students of actual event that happened because of the Indian Removal Act. It focuses on using primary documents, such as, letters, speeches, artwork, and personal accounts of different events. This Unit goes in chronological order of the removal of different Native American tribes. The goal of the Unit is to get the students to analyze and interpret the data provided in order to think critically of the events that the United States Government has enforced. The classroom has 25 students. 15 students in the classroom are white, seven are African American, and three are Hmong. The classroom is majority male. There are two gifted students. One student has mild ADHD.



Essential Questions:

-Why would the United States remove Native American Indians from their native lands? This is a great question to start the unit with. Many students know a brief knowledge of Indian removal, but don’t fully understand appeal and significance to the U.S government. Getting them to think of all the reason why and how Indian Removal got started will help them grasp the concept of how it actually happened.



-How did the Indian removal act actually happen and was it peaceful? This question will get the students thinking about how the government used its over whelming force to drive hundreds of thousands of Indians to leave their native land. Getting the student’s the think of the severity of uprooting tribes and placing them at new locations wouldn’t be easy, or peaceful.

- What is the significance of the Indian Removal act for the Indians and Americans? This is a great question to get the students thinking about the world we all live in today. It will get the students engaged to see how far the Indian Removal act has come. It will show the significance of major people of the movement. It also will allow students to think of how there still are inequalities between Native American’s and Americans.



Identify Standard: U.S History 4-8

  1. U.S. HISTORY: E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861 The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America: 1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations. 1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families

  1. U.S. HISTORY G. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916 The student will analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution. 2. Students will identify and explain racial segregation and racism, including the rise of “Jim Crow,” the Ku Klux Klan, discrimination against immigrants, and the relocation of American Indian tribes to reservations, and analyze the impact of these actions. 1. Political attitudes toward the post-Reconstruction South, transcontinental railroad and immigrant labor, American Indian relocation.

Prior Knowledge: During earlier grades (k-4th) students learned basic information about different Indian Tribes. Standard I. C. sub-strands state: 1. Students will understand that large and diverse American Indian nations were the original inhabitants of North America. 2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of European exploration and settlement of the North American continent and the resulting interaction with American Indian nations. With this information, the unit is going to go more in-depth so students can fully understand about Native American history.

Lesson #1

“3 Perspectives of Indian Removal”


  1. U.S. HISTORY: E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861 The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America: 1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations. 1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will use critical thinking skills and analyze clues to read and interpret primary documents about different perspectives on Indian Removal.

  2. Students will use comprehension skills to formulate answers to questions possessed after the documents have been read.

Assessment: Students will be informally assessed during the class time by the teacher walking around and listening to discussions. In addition, students will be asses when they share their answers with that class. A good answer will connect many different readings and responses together to form one concrete reasonable answer.

Transitions: This is the first lesson in the “Indian Removal Unit” so previous class information about earlier learned information will be shared. This Unit should follow the Unit on the years after the Revolutionary War.

Opening: How long have your families been living in this area? Take a couple of answers. Some of your families have been living around here for up to 100 years or more. Imagine if someone came to your town and told you to pack up your things you have 1 day to leave or you will be shot? Pretty crazy to think about, but it’s not too far off of our new unit of study “Indian Removal”. This unit is going to last ten days and everybody is going to enjoy every day. Everyone is going to have the opportunity to explore and think about exciting new bits of information of our history. So get ready and let’s have some fun. Today’s lesson is going to focus on tree different perspectives of “Indian Removal”

Procedure:



  1. Separate students into equal groups: Since there is 25 students let’s make groups of five groups of five. Count students of in a random pattern. Separate groups into different sections of the room.

    1. Now I am going to pass out a sheet of paper that has five different roles on it. Each person is going to be assigned a role. Each person must follow their role so that the activity can be competed the roles are followed:

      1. Team Facilitator: Make sure everyone understand the document. Make sure everyone had materials to complete their role. Make sure everyone is involved and learning.

      2. The Author: Like for information about the Author. Look for evidence in the document that would help you to understand what the author believes, values, or thinks.

      3. The Audience: Look for evidence in the document that would help you to understand the author’s sense of audience at the time the document was written. Why did the author choose this audience?

      4. The Connector: Make connections between the document and other documents that you know. Make connections between the document and historical information you know.

      5. The Summarizer: Write down what the group has learned. Write down words your group are unfamiliar with and what you think they might mean. What is the tone of the article?

    2. Once this has been explained have the students take a few minutes to choose who wants to play which role. If they cannot agree in 2 minutes, walk around and assign.

    3. After every group is ready, pass out a different perspective to each group. Since there are three perspectives and five groups, two groups will have the same articles to read.

      1. Have them get started on reading and understanding the articles.

      2. After articles have been read, pass out the next sheet that has the questions that need to be answered.

    4. Give 25 minutes to work.

    5. After the time is passed and students are completed with the worksheet have each group go to the front of the class and share what each of their roles was and how it helped them answer the questions.

      1. During this time, the teacher should be listening and doing an informal assessment on the students. Should be listening to each response to make sure they used critical thinking skills and followed directions.

  1. Return students to their seats.

Closure: What did everybody learn today in reading about peoples perspectives about Native American Removal? Were there certain people who felt completely different from other people? Expect answers like Indians were against, whites were all for the removal. If you were living during this time, what side would you be on? Expect to be on the Indian side. Okay, good work today everybody. In tomorrow’s lesson, we are going to find out more about the government’s role in the Removal when we look at the “Indian Removal Act of 1830”

Materials:



  • Paper

  • Pencils

  • Documents

Resources:



  • Primary Document Website: http://www.teachushistory.org/files/indianremoval/Indian-Removal-Documents.pdf

Accommodations: For the student who has ADHD in this classroom the lesson needs to be slightly changed. His directions and information needs to be structured and well laid out so he is able to follow the directions. Also during group time, the teacher should be making sure he is staying on task.

Modifications: In a case where a student for some reason is unable to attend or is unable to focus during the class time for personal reason one article from each perspective will be either sent home or emailed to a parent to be completed at home and returned upon returning.

Enrichment: For the two students who are gifted in this classroom during discussion time they should be assigned more than one role in order to keep them busy. In addition, they should help lead the discussion in order to help other students.

Self-Reflections: I feel that this lesson is unique because it gives the students and chance to see different perspectives of people who were actually living around the time of Indian Removal. I think that this lesson might be more of a two-day lesson, but since this class in the 8th grade, they are able to handle it in one.

“Indian Removal Act 1830”

U.S. HISTORY G. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916 The student will analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution. 2. Students will identify and explain racial segregation and racism, including the rise of “Jim Crow,” the Ku Klux Klan, discrimination against immigrants, and the relocation of American Indian tribes to reservations, and analyze the impact of these actions. 1. Political attitudes toward the post-Reconstruction South, transcontinental railroad and immigrant labor, American Indian relocation.

Learning Objectives:


  1. Students will research and understand the reasons leading up to the passing of the “Indian Removal Act”.

  2. Students will use critical thinking skills to analyze documents to gain their own understanding of the actual event that happened.

Assessment: Assessment will be given during class in an informal verbal tests. Students who fully understand will be able to articulate this through the answers of various questions.

Transitions: Last class session we took an intro into the Indian Removal from three different perspectives. Students were able to understand that the government was for the relocation of Indians. Natives were against and resisted relocation and Non- government whites knew it wasn’t right, but were for the relocation.

Opening: Who can tell me what we learn yesterday during our first day of our new unit? Expect answers about different perspectives on Indian removal. Well, in today’s lesson we are going to learn about what role our government actually had in the removal of Native American’s. The main law they passed which forced Indians to leave was passed in 1830 by President Andrew Jackson named the Indian Removal Act of 1830.

Procedure:



  1. Today’s lesson is both fun and interactive. Today you all get the chance to be a reporter for “New York Times” around the time Andrew Jackson was president after signed the “Indian Removal Act”. You are encouraged to write your article as the living as this event happened.

    1. Pass out the list of sources for the students.

      1. Inform them to that they should review all of the websites before they start their articles for the press.

      2. Dismiss them to the computer library.

  2. Give students 25 minutes to research.

    1. Make sure the student’s try to find the “5” W’s in their research.

  3. `After research is completed have them return to their seats and start working on their reports. Have the students continue working until class is dismissed.

Closure: Okay, well that is about all the time we have for today. Keep working on those assignments tonight and make sure to hand them in at the beginning of class tomorrow. In addition, get ready because tomorrow the action really heats up when we learn about the “Trail Of Tears”.

Materials:



  • Note taking paper

  • Website resource list

  • Computer Lab

  • Newspaper style lined paper.

Resources:

  • Related Websites

  • http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2959.html
    Indian Removal site

  • http://www.studyworld.com/indian_removal_act_of_1830.htm
    Historical overview

  • http://www.emayzine.com/lectures/chronolo.html
    Chronology of events

  • http://www.synaptic.bc.ca/ejournal/jackson.htm
    Andrew Jackson’s case for removal

  • http://hcl.chass.ncsu.edu/garson/dye/docs/removal.htm
    Text of removal act

  • http://www.siskiyous.edu/class/hist7/lecsix.htm
    Indian reaction to Act

  • http://www.imsa.edu/edu/socsci/jvictory/
    required_sem1/indian_removal_sc.htm
    Cherokee Nation v Georgia

  • http://www.catawba.k12.nc.us/techtrac/plus/taylor/who's%20who.htm
    Major players

Accommodations: For the student who has ADHD in this classroom the lesson needs to be slightly changed. His directions and information needs to be structured and well laid out so he is able to follow the directions. His paper will be in less of a structured format. This is done to make sure he answers all five of the five W’s.

Modifications: Since the majority of this lesson can be done over the internet, any student that misses classes for any reason students will be emailed the class lesson and expected be competed on their return.

Enrichment: For the two gifted students they are given a stricter rubric for their newspaper article. The rubric will include more than the five W’s. Their essay should include more in-depth connecting the Indian Removal Act to history facts.

Self-Reflections: I think that this lesson gives the students a chance to get involved and immersed and place themselves in this time. I think they will have fun researching, but have less fun doing the writing as homework. I might think about splitting it into two lessons where the second lesson is strictly to write their newspaper article.

“Trail of Tears”


  1. U.S. HISTORY: E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861 The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America: 1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations. 1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will understand the repercussions of the “Indian Removal Act”, and what it meant for the Cherokee Indians.

  2. Students will use critical thinking skills to analyze primary document to gain a better understanding of the significance of the Trail of Tears.

Assessment: The learning for the students will be assessed at the end of class in an informal poster they create as a group. The poster should have pictures, describing sentences, and a well-detailed map.

Transitions: Last class period the class discussed what the “Indian Removal Act of 1830” was and what it meant for the future of the Native Americans. Students researched different websites and gathered a variety of facts and as homework created a newspaper article as if they were living during that time-period.

Opening: Good afternoon, class, hope your day is going well. I would like to take a second to review what was learned yesterday. Can anybody tell my something they learned yesterday? Expect a variety of answers on the “Removal Act”. Good, did everyone get a chance to finish their newspaper articles? Good, I would like everyone to pass them to the front so I can collect them. Now on today’s lesson. Today we are going to focus on learning on the repercussions of the passing of the “Indian Removal Act”. The first victim of this Act was the Cherokee Indians. They were forced to leave their native lands to move west of the Mississippi. The movement of the Cherokee people is known as the “Trail of Tears”. This name was given to it because of the extremely hard march they were led on. Over a 10-year period over 70,000 Indians were moved from their homeland. Many of them were women and children who were too weak to make the journey, dying on the way.

Procedure:



    1. This part of the lesson focuses on the “Trail of Tears” that the Cherokee tribe endured.

      1. Students are placed in groups of 4-5 students, and as a group they are re-released to the computers to find out the five W’s (who, what, where, when, why, and how).

      2. After students have competed their research, they should return to their seats and will be given a sheet of butcher paper.

        1. After gaining all the information, they will draw a map of where the Cherokee tribe started, and where they ended.

        2. The sides of the paper should have a short paragraph about all of the five W’s. Students are encouraged to use creativity, color, and other skills to draw a well depicted map of the trail and what it was like on the trail

    2. Students will complete this map and share it with the class; each group will have the option to answer one of the five W’s they wrote about. Posters will be hung all around the room so students can see all of the different art works.

Closure: The “Trail of Tears” was a major event that was a result of “Indian Removal Act”. Would anyone like to share something that they found unique today? Something they didn’t know before and were shocked to find out? Expect some horrible stories that the soldiers did to the Indians. Although this seems like a consequence, this is only one story of many that we will focus on. Tomorrow we are going to pick up right where we left off when we talk about the Native American Tribes that lived in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Materials:



  • Computer Lab

  • Paper/pencils

  • Boucher paper

  • Color Markers

Resources: None

Accommodations: For the student in my classroom who has ADHD I would have a set of resource websites for him/her to look at while looking on the internet. This would help him stay on track and be less likely to cause problems with the other students.

Modifications: This lesson plan could be changed for a student who is unable to attend class for any reason. The lesson would be turned more into a short essay format. The student would receive and email telling them to find the five W’s of the “Trial of Tears” and to craft a short essay explaining what they found.

Enrichment: For the gifted students within the classroom it should be made clear that they should look deeper than the five W’s to try to connect this issue with other ones we have previously discussed.

Self-Reflections: I think that this lesson would be fun for the students. They would be able search the internet to find information rather than reading it from a textbook. The posters should turn out nice and provide the classroom with some nice decorations.

“Minnesota and Wisconsin Indians”



  1. U.S. HISTORY: E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861 The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America: 1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations. 1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to identify the different names and locations of the Anishinabe/Ojibwe/Chippewa Nation

  2. Students will use critical thinking skills to discuss the language, history, and culture of the Anishinabe people

Assessment: The assessment of the students during this lesson will be informal. Students will be assessed on the discussions they share with the class.

Transitions: Last class period the students researched and present a poster of all of the things they learned about the repercussions of the “Indian Removal Act” which started with the Trail of Tears. This lesson is going to take a break from the negative side and be lighted up with some interesting facts about Indian in our area.

Opening: Good afternoon class, can anyone remind us of that we did yesterday? Expect answers on the “Trial of Tears”. Yes, that’s correct, we learned about the forced movement of over 70,000 Cherokee Indians over a 10-year period to land west of the Mississippi. Well today, we are going to take a break from all the negative aspects of Native Americans. We are going to learn about the culture of Indians that lived in this very area and Wisconsin. They lived a very fascinating life. I think you are really going to like the culture and traditions of Minnesota and Wisconsin’s Native Americans.

Procedure:



  1. What we are going to do first is going to be interesting and fun. I am going to show you some really cool and unique paintings about the dress of Native Americans that lived in the very area we live it. Everyone should take out a piece of paper and take a few notes on what they find interesting and unique.

    1. Show website : http://www.nativetech.org/clothing/regions/region7.html

      1. This website has some basic drawings of what the everyday attire would be for the Indians.

    2. Then visit this website to discuss footwear: http://www.nativetech.org/clothing/moccasin/moctext.html

      1. Have a student read a paragraph at a time of the reading. It is easy reading so it shouldn’t be a problem for them.

  2. After showing the clothes, the lesson should move on to some of the unique ways that the Great Lake Indians lived. One of the cool things they did was make maple sugar, which believe it or not was passed onto the settlers and is still used by people today!

    1. To view this process and read a little more about it follow this link: http://www.nativetech.org/sugar/sugarbush.html

      1. Have students again read the process to the entire class

        1. Make sure students are taking notes.

    2. After the fascination with maple sugar is gone, move onto all of the ways the native Americans were resourceful with birch-bark

      1. Follow this link to find out all of the unique stuff the Natives learned how to make: http://www.nativetech.org/brchbark/brchbark.htm

      2. Again, have the students take notes while this time the teacher reads about birch-bark.

    3. Discuss the items and pictures with students, pointing out which objects were used in the past and which continue to be of use today. Can they identify what the objects are and what they are used for? Which of the objects have they used in their own lives? What similar objects make up part of their daily lives, or their family or community traditions?

Closure: Now that we have learned some interesting and unique facts about Indians that used to live on the very ground we live on we can relate to them better. What are a few interesting things everyone wrote down on their paper? Let’s all take a turn and share one thing that really sparked their interest. Wait for everyone to share. Great, all interesting stuff. Well that’s all of the time we had for today, but get ready because tomorrow we are going to learn more about the Great Plains Indian culture.

Materials:



  • Computer

  • Internet

  • Paper

  • Pencils

  • Circle formation of desks

Resources:

  • http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=369#LESSON1

Accommodations: For the student who has ADHD in this classroom the lesson would accommodate him. First, a note worksheet would be mad for him so he wouldn’t have to focus on taking notes. In addition, he would be seated at the front of the classroom, as other students would be a distraction to him.

Modifications: This lesson follows links on a website, so if a student is absent an email can be sent to him/her to follow the links and write a short essay on different things they learned.

Enrichment: For the two gifted students, they should be asked to in addition to taking notes, compare and contrast these Indians to the Cherokee tribe.

Self-Reflections: Although the majority of this lesson would be lecture, I feel the students would enjoy it because it is more relatable to them because the Indians of focus lived in our very area.

“Great Plains Culture”


  1. U.S. HISTORY G. Reshaping the Nation and the Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1916 The students will analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in response to the Industrial Revolution. 2. Students will identify and explain racial segregation and racism, including the rise of “Jim Crow”, the Ku Klux Klan, discrimination against immigrants, and the relocation of American Indian tribes to reservations, and analyze the impact of these actions. 1. Political attitudes toward the post-Reconstruction South, transcontinental railroad and immigrant labor, American Indian relocation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will be fully immersed into Lakota and Dakota Indian culture by researching and presenting their findings to the entire class in a 10-minute presentation.

  2. Students will gain a better understanding of the Native American way of life, by researching and reenacting their beliefs and customs with class presentation.

Assessment: A formal assessment will be assessed on the day of their presentations. A specific rubric will be passed out to the student so they know exactly what they need to cover within their presentation. In addition, students will be evaluating every group and grading each other.

Transitions: Last class’s lesson focused on Indian tribes that lived in the area surrounding us in Minnesota and Wisconsin. It is important for them to know about the Indian tribes around our living area. This lesson focuses on the Great Plains Indians. Un-like the Minnesota and Wisconsin Indians there was a lot more battles and controversies between the U.S Government and the Dakota Indians.

Opening: Who can tell me what they can remember from yesterday’s lesson? Expect answers about the unique things the Indian tribes around us used to do and wear. That’s great memory skills. Today we are going to move west and focus on the Great Plains Indians. Pay attention as I show you a little bit about the Great Plains Indians in this short video.

Procedure:



  1. Students are introduced to the great plains Indians though a short video called “The Plains Indians”: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLISvdf8yyE

    1. This short film shows some unique pictures of Indian culture and should spark some interest for the students to find more information about.

  2. Students are separated into groups of 3-4.

  3. Each group is encouraged to choose one facet of the plains Indians culture to do a deep research on.

    1. Food

    2. Religion

    3. Dress

    4. Music

    5. Clothing

  4. The students are dismissed to research their chosen topics. Students should find a variety of information about their topic.

    1. They should find out why their topic is important to the Indians.

    2. They should compare and contrast Indian and American cultural differences on their chosen topics.

  5. Students are given 30-40 minutes to research their topics before the class is pulled back together. Then next instruction is going to be modeled to the students. The teacher will explain the next set of the lesson is going to be the presentation which will happen during tomorrow’s class. Students will be encouraged to put on a well thought out presentation. The students will be given a rubric detailing what is needed for the presentation.

    1. Example: Find native dress, make food, and reenact a dance.

  6. The teacher will then display their presentation to give the students a better understand of what is expected. The teacher will present on the topic of their choice, but making it interesting and very fun/funny for the student to encourage student to let interested and more open to different ideas.

  7. Pass out the grade Rubric for this presentation.

Closure: So, today we had the chance to pick a certain area of culture of the Great Plains Indians and research it. Tomorrow’s class everyone will present their area of culture and it will be a lot of fun. Don’t be afraid of getting creative with this presentation.

Materials:



  • Internet

  • Computers

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLISvdf8yyE

  • Paper

  • Pencils

  • Presentation materials for the teacher’s choice.

Resources:

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLISvdf8yyE

Accommodations: For the student who has ADHD he should be placed in a group and given a specific area to research and a certain role. Ex recorder, time keeper. This will keep him focused and on task.

Modifications: Students should try to attend class, but if are unable to attend they will watch the presentations the following day and write a short report on each area of culture.

Enrichment: Student who are gifted are expected to go above and behind with presentation.

Self-Reflections: I think students will really enjoy this class. The more effort the teacher puts in to presentation demonstration the more effective it will be.

“Presentation Day”


  1. U.S. HISTORY: E. Growth and Westward Expansion, 1801-1861 The student will demonstrate knowledge of western expansion, conflict, and reform in America: 1. Students will examine the processes that led to the territorial expansion of the United States including wars and treaties with foreign nations and Indian nations, the Mexican-American War, annexation, Louisiana Purchase and other land purchases, and the removal of American Indians to reservations. 1. The acquisitions of Florida, Texas, Oregon, and California, the Mormon Trail, frontier families

Learning Objectives:

  1. Student will learn about the Great Plains Indians through watching other classmates’ presentations.

Assessment: The student will be evaluated on their presentation determined through the rubric that was passed out.

Transitions: Yesterday’s lesson the students researched an Indian culture topic. Today they will present their findings today in presentation form.

Opening: Good afternoon boys and girls. I hope that everyone worked hard on their presentations last night and are ready to present. Without wasting any more time lest, get to our first presentation.

Procedure:



  1. Place all different group subjects into a hat and draw names out one by one. Whoever is drawn first will be first to go, and so on and on

  2. Pass out rubrics to each student in the classroom

    1. Note one rubric for each presentation.

  3. Inform the students that they are to follow the presentation and grade their peers on all of the areas of the rubric.

  4. Start presentations.

  5. End presentations after every group has gone.

Closure: Congratulations and great work on your presentations. It was fun to watch. Can anyone tell me something they learned today from another group’s presentation? Expect answers about the unique culture of the Indian tribes. Tomorrow’s lesson is going to include the attempted removal of the Great Plains Indians and its effects.

Materials:



  • Pencil

  • Materials for presentation

  • Rubric Grading Sheet

Resources:

Create a Rubric “http://pblchecklist.4teachers.org/testing.php3?idunique=3&max=6&checklist=1”

Accommodations: For the student in the classroom who has ADHD a rubric should be given but not filled out. Their attention should be focused on the presentations and not grading the other students. This will keep them on task.

Modifications: This is an in class activity and no modifications can be made.

Enrichment: For the students who are gifted in this classroom, they should try to link all of the presentations together and make a connection. This connection should be turned in at the end of the class

Self-Reflections: I think this is a fun and interesting lesson. Students will like it. Maybe allow more than one night to prepare for the presentations.


  1   2


The database is protected by copyright ©essaydocs.org 2016
send message

    Main page