11th Grade Literature: Mirror and Catalyst for Change



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Sarah Menger Menger 1

TE 407 Sec 001

Curriculum Map2
11th Grade Literature: Mirror and Catalyst for Change


Unit

Texts

Assessments

Eng Goals


# of Wks

Unit 1
Heroes
To believe in the heroic makes heroes”-Benjamin Disraeli

Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Selections from “Beowulf”


Read/hear ballad of Robin Hood by Francis James Child
“Superman” or “The Punisher” Graphic Novel from DC Comics

Film: Beowulf (2007)

Clips from Lord of the Rings (2001)
Optional: Listen to NPR’s series “In Character” on the Joker from 2008’s The Dark Knight


1) A compare/contrast essay in which different kinds of heroes are compared (i.e. tragic hero like Hamlet, epic hero like Beowulf, anti-hero like the Punisher, or superhero like Superman) Use http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/compcontrast/map/ to map out your essay
2) A comic strip which illustrates one of Beowulf’s epic battles
3) Create a “60 second Shakespeare” at http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/shakespeare/60secondshakespeare/
4) (For fun!) Play the hamlet game at http://versificator.co.uk/hamlet/

Oral tradition
Epic poems and the epic hero
Classical mythology
Literary terms :allusion, hubris, epic, bard, etc…
Middle English/ Modern English Grammar comparison

4

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 1:

  • CE 1.3.2 Compose written and spoken essays or work-related text that demonstrate logical thinking and the development of ideas for academic, creative, and personal purposes: essays that convey the author’s message by using an engaging introduction (with a clear thesis as appropriate), well-constructed paragraphs, transition sentences, and a powerful conclusion.

  • CE 3.2.3 Identify how elements of dramatic literature (e.g., dramatic irony, soliloquy, stage direction, and dialogue) illuminate the meaning of the text.

Unit 2
Identity Creation, Confusion, and Exasperation

“The Tyger” by William Blake
Students select a creation myth from around the world at

http://facstaff.gpc.edu/~shale/humanities/literature/religion/creation.html
“I am Waiting” by Lawrence Ferlinghetti
“My Tocaya” by Sandra Cisneros
Film: Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night
Audio: Pete Seeger “Little Boxes”
Optional: “Poor Little Black Fellow” by Langston Hughes
“Puerto Rican Obituary” by Pedro Pietri


1) A Digital story which tells the story of one particular creation myth including how it affects individual identity in that culture.
2) Draw a Picture and a brief description of one of the “characters” we have studied
OR
Create a character Trading Card of one of the “characters” we have studied. http://readwritethink.org/materials/trading_cards/

3) Identify figurative language in the poems we have read. Create a visual aid which shows important metaphors, similes, imagery, etc...



Character Traits
Archetypes
Digital Literacy
Figurative Language
Poetic Devices

5

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 2

  • CE 1.5.4 Use technology tools (e.g, word processing, presentation and multimedia software) to produce polished written and multimedia work (e.g., literary and expository works, proposals, business presentations, advertisements).

  • CE 3.1.1 Interpret literary language (e.g., imagery, allusions, symbolism, metaphor) while reading literary and expository works.

  • CE 3.1.9 Analyze how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues in literature and other texts reflect human experience.

Unit 3
It’s Alive!”; On Frankenstein, Technology and Materialism

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

William Wordsworth “The World is Too Much With Us”


Current magazine advertisements and select TV commercials

1) In-class debate on the pros/cons of particular technological advances
2) Imagine that the monster from Frankenstein is suing his creator and goes to trial. Write a legal script of the fictional trial.
3) Analyze one advertisement and what it says about the particular culture it is from. Write a brief essay (1-2pages) on this topic.


Literary Devices: Frame story, flashbacks
Gothic Romance
The Romantic Poets
Structured Debate


3

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 3

  • CE 3.1.3 Recognize a variety of plot structures and elements (e.g., story within a story, rising action, foreshadowing, flash backs, cause-and-effect relationships, conflicts, resolutions) and describe their impact on the reader in specific literary works.

  • CE 3.1.9 Analyze how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues in literature and other texts reflect human experience.

Unit 4
Fairy Tales, Folk lore, and fantasy: Reflection of Cultural Norms

The Brothers Grimm selections “Fitcher’s Bird”, “Little Red Cap” and “Cinderella”
Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Select African Folktales found at http://www.canteach.ca/elementary/africa1.html




1) Write an original short story/fairy tale which reflects the cultural values of today
2) A short essay discussing the fairy tales you were told as a child and the messages that were instilled into your mind

Elements of a Short story
Folklore as a reflection of cultural values
Creative writing
Archetypes
Grammar review

3

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 4

  • CE 1.3.2 Compose written and spoken essays or work-related text that demonstrate logical thinking and the development of ideas for academic, creative, and personal purposes: essays that convey the author’s message by using an engaging introduction (with a clear thesis as appropriate), well-constructed paragraphs, transition sentences, and a powerful conclusion.

  • CE 3.1.9 Analyze how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues in literature and other texts reflect human experience.

Unit 5
What the Future Holds: Dystopia and Utopia

Literature Circle Options:

  • Brave New World by Aldus Huxley

  • A Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

  • 1984 by George Orwell

  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Film: V for Vendetta


W.B Yeats “The Second Coming”
Selections from HG Wells’ A Modern Utopia


1) Each Literature Circle group will prepare a presentation for the class summarizing their novel and providing historical context for the issues addressed in each novel.
2) Students will write a journal entry in the form of a utopia/dystopia, describing their critiques and concern about the future including discussion of social issues like the environment, technology, limits on freedom, gender relations, etc…

Dystopian and Utopian Literature
Poetic Conventions
Public Speaking

5

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 5

  • CE 1.2.2 Write, speak, and visually represent to develop self-awareness and insight

  • CE 1.2.3 Write, speak, and create artistic representations to express personal experience and perspective (e.g., personal narrative, poetry, imaginative writing, slam poetry, blogs, webpages).

  • CE 1.3.7 Participate collaboratively and productively in groups

  • CE 1.5.2 Prepare spoken and multimedia presentations that effectively address audiences by careful use of voice, pacing, gestures, eye contact, visual aids, audio and video technology.

  • CE 2.3.7 Participate as an active member of a reading, listening, and viewing community, collaboratively selecting materials to read or events to view and enjoy (e.g., book talks, literature circles, film clubs).




Unit 6
The Western World and “the other”

Selections from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness
“A Modest Proposal” by Jonathon Swift
George Orwell “Shooting an Elephant”
Rudyard Kipling “The White Man’s Burden”
Optional: “To the Person Sitting in Darkness” by Mark Twain

1) Select a passage from Heart of Darkness and write about its significance and relevance in the historical and social context
2) Socratic Circle Discussion in class

Close Reading
Critical Analysis
Discussion

3

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 6

  • CE 1.3.2 Compose written and spoken essays or work-related text that demonstrate logical thinking and the development of ideas for academic, creative, and personal purposes: essays that convey the author’s message by using an engaging introduction (with a clear thesis as appropriate), well-constructed paragraphs, transition sentences, and a powerful conclusion.

  • CE 2.2.1 Recognize literary and persuasive strategies as ways by which authors convey ideas and readers make meaning (e.g., imagery, irony, satire, parody, propaganda, overstatement/understatement, omission, and multiple points of view).

  • CE 3.2.4 Respond by participating actively and appropriately in small and large group discussions about literature (e.g., posing questions, listening to others, contributing ideas, reflecting on and revising initial responses).

Unit 7
Modernism and Stream of Consciousness: Going against the grain

Carl Sandburg’s “Chicago”
Virginia Woolf To the Lighthouse
Selections from TS Eliot’s “The Wasteland”
Film: The Third Man
A Lifetime of Secrets by Frank Warren

1) Compare Virginia Woolf’s Novel and the film The Third Man in style. What are their social critiques? Write a critical essay which discusses the two texts and how the structure and visual conventions convey their messages.
2) Further research one or more of Eliot’s allusions and present findings to the class; visit http://eliotswasteland.tripod.com/ and see scholarly journals
3) Read 3-4 secrets from the Postsecret book and find a common theme. Post in our online discussion forum how these secrets reflect the abstract expression of Modernism and their relation to the collective unconscious.

Modernist Literature
Stream of Consciousness
Research and analysis of a text

4

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 7

  • CE 2.1.8 Recognize the conventions of visual and multimedia presentations (e.g., lighting, camera angle, special effects, color, and soundtrack) and how they carry or influence messages.

  • CE 3.1.1 Interpret literary language (e.g., imagery, allusions, symbolism, metaphor) while reading literary and expository works.

  • CE 3.4.1 Use methods of close and contextualized reading and viewing to examine, interpret, and evaluate print and visual media and other works from popular culture.

Unit 8

Discontent and Counterculture in America

JD Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye
Selections from Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl”
Langston Hughes “Let America be America Again”
Audio: Bob Dylan “The Times They are A Changing”

1) An original poem which reflects the discontent of the time period and the artistic style of the beat generation
2) A blog which is written from the perspective of a teenage youth in the 1950s/ 1960s


American Literature
Poetry
Critical Perspectives

5

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 8

  • CE 1.2.3 Write, speak, and create artistic representations to express personal experience and perspective (e.g., personal narrative, poetry, imaginative writing, slam poetry, blogs, webpages).

  • CE 3.1.9 Analyze how the tensions among characters, communities, themes, and issues in literature and other texts reflect human experience.

  • CE 3.4.1 Use methods of close and contextualized reading and viewing to examine, interpret, and evaluate print and visual media and other works from popular culture.

Unit 9
Contemporary Literature: Emphasis on Social Issues

Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech
They Poured Fire on Us from the Sky by Alephonsion Deng, Benson Deng, and Benjamin
  Ajak
Audio: Selected poems by spoken word artists like Bob Holman, Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz, and Beau Sia
Audio: Bob Marley “Redemption Song”
Current Newspaper Articles as chosen by the student


1) Write and deliver a persuasive speech on a contemporary controversial issue
2)An in class Poetry Slam which reflects the style of contemporary spoken word artists
3) A newspaper article which summarizes and addresses the issues of the Lost Boys and the Sudanese Civil War
4) Turn in your Final Portfolio of your work this year with reflections on your learning.

Persuasive Writing
Contemporary Poetry and spoken word tradition
Critical Perspectives

5

State of Michigan Standards Addressed in Unit 9

  • CE 1.1.1 Demonstrate flexibility in using independent and collaborative strategies for planning, drafting, revising, and editing complex texts.

  • CE 1.1.4: Compose drafts that convey an impression, express an opinion, raise a question, argue a position, explore a topic, tell a story, or serve another purpose, while simultaneously considering the constraints and possibilities (e.g., structure, language, use of conventions of grammar, usage, and mechanics) of the selected form or genre.

  • CE 1.2.4 Assess strengths, weaknesses, and development as a writer by examining a collection of own writing.

  • CE 1.3.4 Develop and extend a thesis, argument, or exploration of a topic by analyzing differing perspectives and employing a structure that effectively conveys the ideas in writing

  • CE 2.2.1 Recognize literary and persuasive strategies as ways by which authors convey ideas and readers make meaning (e.g., imagery, irony, satire, parody, propaganda, overstatement/understatement, omission, and multiple points of view).

  • CE 3.4.1 Use methods of close and contextualized reading and viewing to examine, interpret, and evaluate print and visual media and other works from popular culture.

Reflection on Curriculum Map

As a teacher I am and always will be, changing and adapting my methods and beliefs about teaching English. This is necessary because education is not static; it is ever changing to meet the needs of each year’s youth. What holds together the changing goals and priorities of English is my teaching philosophy. This curriculum map reflects my current beliefs about teaching English and my philosophy about education. I believe that education should be meaningful and relevant to student’s everyday lives; that it should appeal to and include an audience of diverse learners; and it should foster critical thinking and further discussion of the subject matter.

Firstly, this curriculum map is evidence of my one overarching belief about teaching, that education should be meaningful and relevant to my students’ lives. The incorporation of technology and internet resources such as the digital story in Unit 1, the “60 second Shakespeare” in Unit 2, and the blog in Unit 3, makes use of the technological skills my students will need as we are on our way to a digital world. Students will be required to do internet research on TS Eliot’s “The Wasteland”, create a newspaper with Microsoft Publisher, and “blog” from different critical perspectives. All of these assignments were created with the intention that my students will not only have fun with their work but also explore the many uses of the internet and computer technology. With the incorporation of humor and popular music like Bob Dylan in Unit 8 to reflect cultural values of the time, I hope to make meaningful connections between my students’ interests and their learning.

Making instructional choices can be difficult because it requires teachers to take into consideration so many different variables in classroom and often times, one choice may lead us on a whole new path than the one on which we began. In creating this curriculum map I found myself torn in a multitude of different directions but ultimately, this final product is a reflection of my belief in appealing to and teaching to a diverse group of learners. I have included a variety of different media in order to appeal to a wide range of student strengths. Mixed in with the essays are comic strips, blogs, original poetry, dramatic performances, and creative writing; there should be something for everyone here. I also have incorporated different cultural texts not only to appeal to the students who are of the same cultural background, but also to open my students’ eyes to a diverse and changing world. The Lost Boys novel, Harlem Renaissance poetry, and the colonial literature of Unit 6 should be excellent starting points in establishing an open discussion.

It is also important to me that my classroom is a venue in which students feel comfortable taking risks and thinking critically. I hope that this curriculum map allows for students to find different outlets which foster creative and critical thinking. Problem solving and analysis are skills which are needed both in the workplace and in social interactions. In several units students will be asked to write a critical essay which uses what they have learned from in-class materials but requires further thinking and analysis. I think that with the many creative assessments like performances and original creative writing, students will feel more comfortable delving deeper into the subject matter.

While creating this curriculum map, I went through many rough drafts which seemed to look nothing alike. Each new idea or theme led me to another and to another. Finally, after considering my beliefs and what I feel is important for my students as learners and as people, this is what it has become. This map is a reflection of my educational philosophies and beliefs about teaching English for today’s students; each unit was thoughtfully created to be meaningful to diverse learners and foster critical thinking.

Revision 1 (9/26)

After reviewing this curriculum map, I have made some revisions to the texts and assessments I will be using. More importantly, I have included a theme-based curriculum in order to make literature more meaningful and interesting for my students. In creating the theme “Literature as a Mirror and a Catalyst for Change” I am emphasizes the following things: literature has the capability of reflecting and spreading cultural norms and values; through literature, authors have the potential to inspire change and challenges to tradition; and that it is important to look at literature as a moldable entity which can shape or be shaped by society.

Revision 2 (9/27)

After attending the MSU Technology Conference for Teachers, I wanted to even further incorporate diverse texts and assessments with technology to address diverse learners. I have included many more internet- based texts and assessments like the African folk tales, graphic organizers like the compare/contrast map online, and the character trading cards with the hope that students will become more “digitally literate” but also in order to appeal to different learning styles. I have also utilized the multitudes of resources available online like listening to the Robin Hood ballads, the NPR broadcast, and other online texts. There is just so much information and resources available on the internet and I feel that these particular ones are useful and appropriate for my curriculum.

Many of the assessments I have chosen are considered “alternative assessments”, that is they are not all the typical essays or exams used traditionally to assess student understanding. I realize that these forms of assessment, exams and essays, do not provide an outlet for all learners to demonstrate their understanding. Some students can demonstrate their learning in creative ways like the journal entries, original creative writing, and the digital story while others might prefer to do so orally through the in-class debate, Socratic discussion circle, and group presentation. I think that at some point in the curriculum, every student can find a form which best demonstrates their learning whether it is through the traditional or the alternative assessments.

Revision 3 (9/28)



After” finalizing” (I say this is final, yet know that it will continue to adapt and change to fit my students’ needs) my curriculum map, I put in the State of Michigan Educational Standards for English/Language Arts Curriculum which were addressed in each unit. I found that several standards could apply for each assessment and each unit. The ones that I chose to focus on I felt were most relevant and most important in my eyes. This curriculum map is a product of thoughtful research and my educational philosophy guided its creation; the standards simply publicly validate the assessments and texts used in this map.


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