11th Grade American Literature Research Paper contents of packet



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11th Grade American Literature Research Paper

CONTENTS OF PACKET

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  • Assignment and list of topics ……….. Pages 2-3
  • Checklist/Timeline …………………. Page 4
  • Avoiding Plagiarism ………………... Page 5

  • MLA Citation Format ………………. Pages 6-7

  • Website Evaluation Checklist ………. Page 8

  • Developing a Thesis Statement/

Controlling Idea ………………………… Pages 9-10

  • Outline Format …………………...… Pages 11-12
  • Using Quotations/citationmachine.net .. Page 13

  • Final Draft Expectations ……………. Page 14
  • Final Draft Grading Rubric ……….… Page 15


Mr. Dial
Fall 2011
11th Grade American Literature Research Paper

Influential People



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Many individuals in history have had a major influence on American and/or world events. Pick an individual who has had a major impact on American or world events and research him or her, examining the significance of his or her role. Individuals such as the following can be considered, as well as others not listed (however, you must clear any alternative topic choice with your teacher first). Please note -- some of the individuals listed below are controversial figures.


In America

Muhammad Ali

Susan B. Anthony

Arthur Ashe

Dennis Banks

Clara Barton

John Brown

Lenny Bruce

Rachel Carson

Cesar Chavez

Roberto Clemente

Crazy Horse

Clarence Darrow

Eugene Debs

Dorothea Dix

Frederick Douglass

W.E.B. DuBois

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Benjamin Franklin

Betty Friedan

William Lloyd Garrison

Gore, Al


Tom Hayden

Patrick Henry

Seymour Hersh

Thomas Jefferson

Barbara Jordan

Chief Joseph

Helen Keller

Billie Jean King

Martin Luther King Jr.

Robert LaFollette

Maya Lin

Abraham Lincoln

The Little Rock 9

Malcolm X

Thurgood Marshall

Arthur Miller

Robert Moses

John Muir

Ralph Nader

Jesse Owens

Thomas Paine

Rosa Parks

Sister Helen Prejean

Jacob Riis

Jackie Robinson

Eleanor Roosevelt

Julius & Ethel Rosenberg

Sojourner Truth

Sacco and Vanzetti

Dr. Jonas Salk

Margaret Sanger

John Scopes

Upton Sinclair

Sitting Bull

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Gloria Steinem

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Ida Tarbell

Hugh Thompson

Henry David Thoreau

Woodward & Bernstein

Harriet Tubman

Nat Turner

Earl Warren

Booker T. Washington

George Washington

Joseph Welch

Outside America

Christopher Columbus

Charles Darwin

Anne Frank

Galilleo

Mohandes Gandhi

Dag Hammarskjold

Vaclav Havel

Joan of Arc

Dalai Lama

Martin Luther

Nelson Mandela

Andrei Sakharov

Ken Saro-Wiwa

Schindler, Oscar

Albert Schweitzer

Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Mother Teresa

Bishop Desmond Tutu

Raoul Wallenberg

Elie Wiesel

Simon Wiesenthal



You will need to use a variety of sources to complete this assignment. The Research Paper must be 4-6 pages in total length, double-spaced (12 pt. Times New Roman font with 1-inch margins), including a cover page and an MLA-style Works Cited page (so at least 4 pages of actual writing).



Research Paper Subjects by Category




Anti-Slavery/Abolitionist


John Brown

William Lloyd Garrison

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Sojourner Truth

Harriet Tubman

Nat Turner



Artist


Maya Lin

Civil Rights


Frederick Douglass

W.E.B. DuBois

Martin Luther King Jr.

The Little Rock 9

Malcolm X

Thurgood Marshall

Rosa Parks

Barbara Jordan

Robert Moses

Jesse Owens

Jackie Robinson

Booker T. Washington



Consumer Advocate


Ralph Nader

Controversial Defendants


Julius & Ethel Rosenberg

Sacco and Vanzetti



Environment/Nature


Rachel Carson

John Muir


Free Speech/Anti-Censorship


Lenny Bruce

Arthur Miller



Holocaust Survivors/Resisters


Anne Frank

Raoul Wallenberg

Elie Wiesel

Simon Wiesenthal


Journalists/Muckrakers


Seymour Hersh

Jacob Riis

Upton Sinclair

Ida Tarbell

Woodward & Bernstein

The Innocence Project



Labor Leaders


Cesar Chavez

Eugene Debs



Native Americans


Dennis Banks

Crazy Horse

Chief Joseph

Sitting Bull


Peace/Humanitarianism


Joe Darby

Mohandes Gandhi

Dag Hammarskjold

Dalai Lama

Bishop Desmond Tutu

Eleanor Roosevelt

Hugh Thompson

Albert Schweitzer


Political/Legal Leaders


Clarence Darrow

Robert LaFollette

Abraham Lincoln

Earl Warren



Political Revolutionaries


Joan of Arc

Benjamin Franklin

Vaclav Havel

Tom Hayden

Patrick Henry

Thomas Jefferson

Martin Luther

Nelson Mandela

Thomas Paine

Ken Saro-Wiwa

George Washington

Prison Reform/Anti-Poverty


Dorothea Dix

Sister Helen Prejean

Mother Teresa

Science/Medicine


Clara Barton

Charles Darwin

Galilleo

Dr. Jonas Salk

John Scopes

Soviet Dissidents


Andrei Sakharov

Alexander Solzhenitsyn



Sports/Athletics


Muhammad Ali

Arthur Ashe

Roberto Clemente

Billie Jean King

Jesse Owens

Jackie Robinson



Women’s Rights


Susan B. Anthony

Betty Friedan

Billie Jean King

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Gloria Steinem

Margaret Sanger



Writers/Philosophers


Ralph Waldo Emerson

Helen Keller

Socrates

Henry David Thoreau



NAME: _____________________ Period: ______

11th Grade American Literature Research Paper

This form is the only place where your points will be recorded. You must turn in this form with your final research paper in order to ensure receiving the full credit.


Date Due

Assignment Due

Pts.


Points Credited and

Teacher Signature

Thursday, November 3



Topic Chosen (write it here):




5




Friday, November 4



Note Card Check #1 (at least 15 cards total)


5




Wednesday, November 9



Note Card Check #2 (at least 30 cards total)


5




Wednesday, November 16



Controlling Idea [thesis statement] due (typed or neatly written in packet)


5




Tuesday, November 22



Detailed Outline due (typed)


10




Tuesday,

December 22, 2011

First Draft Due (typed with cover and works cited page – this should resemble a finished product) – First Draft must be resubmitted with Final Draft


25





Thursday,

Jan. 12, 2012

Final Draft Due (typed with cover and works cited page – this sheet must be included as the last page). Hand in your first draft also.


45




TEACHER COMMENTS:






FINAL GRADE

PLAGIARISM: A Warning

Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty that robs the intellectual property of others. Plagiarism is NEVER acceptable. A research paper showing evidence of plagiarism will receive a grade of zero with no chance of raising the score, and a discipline referral . Remember – if you can find papers or passages to copy on the internet, your teacher can find them, too.



What is Plagiarism


Many people think of plagiarism as copying another's work, or borrowing someone else's original ideas. But terms like "copying" and "borrowing" can disguise the seriousness of the offense:

According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, to "plagiarize" means


  1. to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own

  2. to use (another's production) without crediting the source

  3. to commit literary theft

  4. to present as new and original an idea or product derived from an existing source.

In other words, plagiarism is an act of fraud. It involves both stealing someone else's work and lying about it afterward.

But can words and ideas really be stolen?

According to U.S. law, the answer is yes. The expression of original ideas is considered intellectual property, and is protected by copyright laws, just like original inventions. Almost all forms of expression fall under copyright protection as long as they are recorded in some way (such as a book or a computer file).



All of the following are considered plagiarism:


  • turning in someone else's work as your own

  • copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit

  • failing to put a quotation in quotation marks

  • giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation

  • changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit

  • copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not.

Most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed, and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source, is usually enough to prevent plagiarism.
Source of the above information: www.plagiarism.org
MLA Citation Format

BOOKS
Format: Author: Title: Subtitle. Place: Publisher, Date.
Examples:

Smith, John. Patience: My Story. New York: Random House, 2001.


Smith, Monica A., and John Jordan. How to Use What You’ve Got To Get What You Want. Washington, DC: Grolier Publishing, 2000.

MAGAZINE & NEWSPAPER ARTICLES



Format: Author, “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical Date: First page-last page.

Examples:

Seinfeld, Jerry. “What I Did Today.” People 4 Dec. 1997: A10.


Jackson, Michael and Lisa Marie Presley. “Why We Got Married.” National Enquirer 01 Feb. 1998: 4-5.

ARTICLE FROM A REFERENCE BOOK



Format: Author. “Title of Article.” Book title: Subtitle. Editor. Place: Publisher, Date. First page-last page. [Simply omit any information that isn’t available]
Examples:

King, Martin Luther, “I Have A Dream” Speeches: The Collected Wisdom of Martin Luther King. James Horn. Washington: King Press, 1971. 10-11.



WEBSITE OR WEBPAGE



Format: Author. Title. Editor. Date. Institution. Access Date . [Omit any information that isn’t available]

Examples:

Student Initiated Drinking and Driving Prevention. 4 Oct. 2000. National GRADD. 16 Feb. 2001 .
Various contributors. How To Be Popular In High School. Jeff Marx Books. 16 Feb. 2001 .
MAGAZINE & NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ACCESSED ONLINE
Format:

Author, “Article Title.” Periodical Date of article. Access Date .

[Simply omit any information that isn’t available]
Examples:

“Customer’s Attempt To Complain To Manager Thwarted By Employee.” The



Onion 14 Feb. 2001 .
Carlson, Margaret. “When a Buddy Movie Goes Bad: Bill and Al, the Boys on the Bus-how long ago that seems.” Time 19 Feb. 2001. 21 Feb. 2001 .


MATERIAL FROM A DATABASE SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE

(such as Ebsco or Infotrac)


Format:

Author. “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical Date: First page-last page. Database Name. Subscription Service. Name of Library. Date of Access .

Examples:

Jensen, Jeff. “High School ‘Olympics’ seek big-time sponsors.” Advertising Age 6 Dec 1993: 1+. MAS Ultra School Edition. Ebsco. Coxsackie-Athens High School Library. 3 Nov 2004


Harder, Nick. “Reader share their crazy and inventive uses for duct tape.” (The Orange County Register) Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service 7 Nov 2002: pK1971. Junior Edition K12. Coxsackie-Athens High School Library. 3 Nov 2004


Name:__________________________URL:_________________________________


Period:_______ Topic of Paper:_________________________________





Website Evaluation Criteria Checklist

I. Authority


Is there an author? 

Is the author qualified? An expert?


Who is the sponsor? Is it someone reputable?
Is there a link to information about the author or the sponsor?
If the page includes neither a signature nor indicates a sponsor, is there any other way to determine its origin?

II. Accuracy


Is the information reliable and error-free?
Is there an editor or someone who verifies/checks the information?

Do any other sources have the same information?




III. Objectivity


Does the information show a minimum of bias?
Is the page designed to influence your opinion?
Are there any ads on the page?

IV. Currency


Is the page dated?
If so, when was the last update?
How current are the links? Have some expired or moved?

V. Coverage


What topics are covered?

What does this page offer that is not found elsewhere?


How in-depth is the material?

NOTE: THIS PAGE MAY BE FILLED OUT AND HANDED IN FOR EXTRA CREDIT


Developing a Thesis Statement

(Controlling Idea)
The following examples show how to develop a thesis statement from a broad, general idea. Each step shows a further narrowing of the topic in order to arrive at a legitimate thesis statement.
Broad Narrow

Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn Biographical significance of the ending


THESIS: Huck’s departure at the end of the novel reflects Twain’s own dissatisfaction

with civilization.


Broad Narrow

Public Schools Length of School Year Positive effect of long school year


THESIS: An extended school year would have a positive effect on learning, student

attitudes toward school, and the retention of skills from year to year.


WHAT A THESIS STATEMENT SHOULD NOT BE:
1. A topic or subject by itself cannot serve as a thesis statement. That information tells what the paper is about, but not what you and your research have to say about it.
2. A question cannot serve as a thesis statement because it is not a statement. A question merely says that an answer will follow. However, a question-and-answer pair can be a thesis statement.
3. A general statement that lacks a detailed point of view cannot serve as a thesis statement. A general statement may give the reader background information but does not reflect your point of view.
4. A “so what?” statement. This kind of thesis statement is too obvious (common knowledge) and demonstrates no originality of thought.

WHAT A THESIS STATEMENT SHOULD BE:


1. A complete sentence or two summarizing the point of view in your paper.
2. A specific declaration of your main idea.
3. A statement reflecting your position.
EXAMPLES:
THESIS: The Midwife’s Apprentice is a realistic interpretation of the Middle Ages, showing what life was really like for the common villager.
THESIS: Throughout To Kill A Mockingbird we see Scout Finch mature as she becomes aware of the true nature of the people in her town.
HINT: You write a thesis statement early to focus your attention – not that of your reader. Therefore, as you do your research, you may wish to modify your statement or radically change it (and perhaps you should). That’s okay, but you need to discuss a major change with your teacher.

Your Thesis Statement


First, Jot down your topic:

Now, think about what it is about this topic that you want everyone to know, which they may not already know. Present this in the form of a statement that you can prove is true with your research. Remember, a thesis is not a general statement (so it is not common knowledge, i.e. the Earth is round).




English Research Paper Outline NAME: _____________________________

***DUE: Tuesday, Nov. 22***


PERIOD: ______



  1. Controlling Idea (Thesis Statement)

(“Controlling Idea” is just another term for thesis statement or main idea of your research paper. Copy your revised controlling idea in this space).



  1. Introduction

(Write down any points you want to include in your introduction in this space. You may write the actual introductory paragraph or simply make bullet-point comments. It is customary for the final sentence of an introduction to be the controlling idea/thesis statement).


  1. Supporting information

(Write down any details or facts that support your thesis statement).

(OVER)


  1. Conclusion

(Use this space to write down any points you want to include in your conclusion. You may write the actual concluding paragraph or simply make bullet-point comments).


  1. List of sources

(List the sources you have consulted so far. You do not have to use MLA style here – just list book titles, websites, etc).

Using Quotes Correctly
In The Crucible John Proctor said, “I say – I say – God is dead!” (111).
During the holocaust the Germans “committed unthinkable acts against humanity” (Price 26).
“In search of a better life, Nelson Mandela strived for equal rights,” remarks Professor Jenkins (26).

SAVE YOURSELF EXTRA WORK by…

using www.citationmachine.net to format your in-text citations and Works Cited page. Click MLA in the upper left corner, select your source type (book, encyclodpedia, web page, etc.), enter required information and click submit, and then cut and past the formatted information into your research paper.
Research Paper Final Draft

Expectations



  1. Research Paper is typed, double-spaced, 12 point font, and a normal font type (Times New Roman is the best – this is the default font in Microsoft Word). Margins should be standard 1-inch margins. The Research Paper should look professional – not wrinkled, misprinted, or damaged




  1. You should have a cover page with your NAME, DATE, CLASS PERIOD, and RESEARCH TOPIC. Feel free to add designs or art to the cover.




  1. Your research paper must be at least 6 typed pages in total, including the “Works Cited” page and the cover page (at least 4 pages of actual writing). It should not exceed 8 pages.




  1. You must use quotations and proper MLA citation form. You should have at least ten citations total. Ex. According to Smith, the Middle Ages were “a very exciting time” (46). You must use at least one direct quote.




  1. You must include a Works Cited page at the end of your paper. This is where you list the sources you have cited in your writing. They are listed alphabetically as in a bibliography page. You must have at least 5 sources listed. At least one source must be a book. Also, one web source must be evaluated in a paragraph below the works cited.




  1. You MUST submit your TIMELINE CHECKLIST in order to receive credit on all of the checks. If you do not submit this form, you may only receive partial credit for the final draft.




  1. First Drafts – Your first draft will only be looked at if it is turned in on time. I highly advise you to submit a first draft, as I will be able to give you suggestions to improve your paper. If you do not submit a rough draft, you will lose 25 points off of the final grade (out of 100). This limits you to a maximum score of 75, assuming you earn maximum credit for all other parts. There should be nothing “rough” about your first draft. It will be the first time I see it, but not the first time you have written it.




  1. Research Papers turned in late will lose 5 points every day.




  1. Check your printer well before it is expected to perform. Printers that are out of ink or don’t work correctly will not constitute a legitimate excuse. Also, computers that fail will not be excused. Save your work often - on both your hard drive and a CD/floppy drive/flash drive. Better yet, save it to the school H-drive, so you can print it here.

Research Paper FINAL DRAFT Grading Rubric (45 points total)

NAME: __________________________

1. Paper is neatly presented & follows Yes No / 5 pts.

format:
2. There are at least 10 citations Yes No / 5 pts.

(with one direct quote) & five sources on “Works Cited” page

and one web source evaluated):
3. A clear thesis is stated: Yes No / 5 pts.
4. Thesis is developed and defended well 5 4 3 2 1 / 20 pts.

& writing is original:


5. Mechanics (spelling & grammar) are 5 4 3 2 1 / 10 pts.

error free:



Total: / 45 POINTS


+ _________ points earned previously


FINAL RESEARCH PAPER GRADE = _________






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