1. Lt. Noah G. 1 Lilley



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Descendants of Noah G. LILLEY

Generation No. 1

1. Lt. Noah G.1 LILLEY was born 19 Apr 1771 in Martin Co., North Carolina, and died Bef. 21 Aug 1844 in Red River Co. (Camp Co.), Texas. He married Mary Curry BARNETT Abt. 1807 in probably Smith Co., Tennessee, daughter of Hugh BARNETT and Margaret McFARLAND. She was born 27 Jul 1785 in Person Co., North Carolina, and died Aft. 1837 in Red River Co. ( Camp Co. ), Texas.

Notes for Lt. Noah G. LILLEY:

On 15 December 1798 in Sumner County, he was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Tennessee Militia. On 15 May 1801 in Smith County, he was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Tennessee Militia. ( Ref: Record of Commission of Officers in the Tennessee Militia....1796-1815...by Mary Brown-Daniel- Moore ) From 1809 to 1819 he was found living in Rutherford County. In 1819 he moved to Hardin County. In 1837 he was found living in Red River County, Texas, ( Ref: Obituary of Thaddius Boliver Lilley ) (Paschal County) ( Red River County ) (Upsher County) now Camp County. ( Note: This part of the County that Noah lived in, changed names several times.) There are three creeks and a town in Camp Co., named after him. Lilley Post Office, North, Middle and South Lilley Creek

Noah Lilley was the postmaster at Lilley P.O. in Hardin Co., Tennessee, which was in existence from May 1834 through June 1835. I suspect that it was near Loweryville which also replaced Cherryville in May of 1835.

LILLEY, TEXAS. Lilley was on the Cherokee Trace near the shores of Lilley Creek 7½ miles from Pittsburgh in southwestern Camp County. The village and the creek were both named for the first settler in the area, Noah Lilley, who patented his land in 1842. A post office was established in Lilley in May 1880 with James Musick as postmaster. The office was closed in January 1883, reopened in September 1890, and closed again in April 1891. By 1908 Lilley had apparently ceased to exist as a named community.

CENSUS: 1810 Rutherford Co. TN. Noah Lilley 26-45, Wife 16-26, 2 Females under 10. He had 1 Slave. 1820 Hardin Co. TN. Noah Lilley, 45+, Wife 26-45, 4 Males under 10, 1 Female under 10, 2 Females 10-16. Slaves; 2 Males to 16, 1Male to 25, 1 Female to 25. 1830 Hardin Co. TN. Noah Lilley 50-60, Wife 40-50, 1 Male 10-30, 2 Males 15-20, 2 Male 5-10, 1 Male under 5, 1 Female 10-15, ( Margaret, Nancy and Martha was already married by the time the 1830 Census was taken) 1840 Republic of Texas Census, his last name spelled as Lelly....4 Slaves....360 Acres.

1839 Noah Lilley furnished 120 bushels of corn at $4.00 per bushel.....$ 480.00. 310 bushel’s of fodder at $4.00 per 100...$12.40. 1 auger at $3.00. Total $ 495.00. To Capt. William B. Stout’s Co. Of Rangers, while stationed at Ft. Sherman.

OBITUARY: Printed in THE NORTHERN STANDARD, CLARKSVILLE, TEXAS on August 21, 1844, page 4, column 1. " Lilly, Noah, Esq., died of acute gastritis on his plantation in the Southern District of Red River County ( now Camp Co. )in the 74th year of his age. He was born in Martin County, NC., in 1771, emigrated to Tennessee at an early day, from whence he came to Texas in 1837. He was a kind and indulgent parent, an honored, benevolent citizen, and has left a large circle of friends and connections to mourn his loss..." From the book: "Abstracts of Early East Texas Newspapers 1839 - 1856":

Notes for Mary Curry BARNETT:

Her ancistors were from Scotland and Londonderry, Ireland. After the death of her father (Hugh Barnett Jr.) her Mother (Margaret Harris (McFarland) Barnett ) and children along with her mothers siblings ( the McFarlands ) moved from Person Co., North Carolina to Ohio Co., (now Daviess Co.,) Kentucky, in about 1805. After the death of Hugh Barnett, Margaret Harris McFarland Barnett met and married Merideth Cox. It is bot known if this marriage took place before she left North Carolina or after her arrival in Kentucky. It is unknown if Noah met Mary on her way from Person Co., North Carolina to Ohio Co., Kentucky or not, since he was living along the route, in Smith Co., Tennessee at the time. In about 1820 when Missouri opened for settlement her mother, some of the children and some of the McFarlands mover from Kentucky to Ralls Co., Missouri. Her mother also lived in Clinton and St. Clair Co's in Missouri. Her mother died in Ralls Co., Missouri in March 1838, and was buried in the family cemetery, which is now a cow pastur. When the Lilley Family moved from Hardin Co., Tennessee to what is now Camp Co., Texas, her son Zachariah did not move to Texas with them, but moved to Missouri where his grandmother and Uncles were living.

Children of Noah LILLEY and Mary BARNETT are:

+ 2 i. Margaret2 LILLEY, born 1808 in Smith Co., Tennessee; died 24 Mar 1840 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

+ 3 ii. Nancy LILLEY, born 1810 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee; died Aft. 1880 in Titus Co., Texas.

+ 4 iii. Sheriff Zachariah ( Zach ) LILLEY, born 06 Jul 1812 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee; died 14 May 1896 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

+ 5 iv. Harris Barnett ( Haad ) LILLEY, born 05 Jul 1814 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee; died 15 Dec 1893 in Daingerfield, Morris Co.,Texas.

+ 6 v. Capt. Joseph David LILLEY, born 30 Nov 1816 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee; died 15 Aug 1860 in Daingerfield, Titus Co.( now Morris Co. ), Texas.

+ 7 vi. Martha Adeline LILLEY, born Apr 1819 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died Nov 1906 in Haskell City, Haskel Co., Texas.

8 vii. Hugh Brantley LILLEY, born 1820 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died Unknown in Unknown.

Notes for Hugh Brantley LILLEY:

TEXAS RANGER: He served under his brother in the Texas Rangers. On 23 July 1841 Capt. Joseph D. Lilley's Company of Paschal County Minute Men Republic of Texas was called to duty. Term of service was 13 days, ending on 4 August 1841.

MEXICAN WAR: At age 27 he served in the Mexican War, in the Texas Mounted Volunteers, Co. E ( Composed of personnel recruited primarily at San Antonio, Texas. Mustered into federal service on June 17, 1847.) ( Deserted at Cerralvo, Mexico on April 30, 1848)

CIVIL WAR: Pvt., Co. A., 2nd Btn. Texas Cavalry State Troops ( 6 months 1863-64 ) CSA

CENSUS: 1850 Federal Census of Texas, Titus Co., dated 11 September 1850, His age was listed as 30, and his occupation a Farmer. He had his brother Thaddeus Boliver, age 22, his occupation listed as a farmer and his sister Mary J. age 17 living with him after the death of their parents. All three listed their place of birth as Tennessee.

+ 9 viii. Harriet M. LILLEY, born 1822 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died Bef. 1860 in Marion Co., Texas.

+ 10 ix. Capt. William Crogan LILLEY, born 1824 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died 1864 in near Crockett, Houston Co., Texas.

11 x. 2nd Lt. Thaedus Boliver( Bob ) LILLEY, born 03 May 1827 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died 27 Mar 1884 in Leesburg, Camp Co., Texas.

Notes for 2nd Lt. Thaedus Boliver( Bob ) LILLEY:

CENSUS: On 11 September 1850 in Titus Co. Texas Census Thaddeus Boliver age 22 and Mary J. age 17 was living with their brother, Hugh B., apparently their parents was dead by this time. 1860 US Census of Texas, Upsher Co. Western District. dated 21 June 1860, age 30. Occupation Farmer. Property valued at 900 dollars. Personal property values at 2,000 dollars. He was living with his sister Nancy Cherry. 1870 Census of Texas, Upsher Co., Pine Tree P.O., Precinct 5, dated Age: 40 Occupation: Farmer 1880 Census of Texas, Camp Co., dated 2 Jul 1880, age 53. His occupation was a Farmer. His sister Mary Sayles was living with him. ( Her name was listed as Lilley instead of Sayles) He listed his mother as being born in Kentucky, instead of North Carolina.

1850 SLAVE SCHEDULE: Titus Co., Texas 15 September 1850. T. B. Lilley owned the following slave; 1 male 23.

CIVIL WAR: Private, 10th Regiment, Texas Cavalry., 2nd Lieutenant, Co. D., Saufley's Scouting Btn., Majors Texas Cavalry and Co. F, Chisum's Reg't Texas Cavalry (Dismounted)( 2 Partisan Rangers, Stone's Regiment ) Also known as 38 Partisan Rangers and Crill Miller's Reg's Texas Dismounted Cavalry, Confederate Army, CSA. On 5 March 1862 while on a march from Clarksville, Texas to Arkansas Perry Cherry and Boliver Lilley came down with the measles. They were left in Clark Co., Arkansas to recover. They later rejoined their command.

OBITUARY: Pittsburg Gazette, dated Wednesday, April 9, 1884 Died, at the residence of Mr. H. G. King, ( son-in-law of Mary J. Lilley Sayles ) in Camp County, March 27th, of Ulceration of the spleen, Mr. T. B. Lilley, in the 57th year of his age. Thaddeus Bolivar Lilley was born in Hardin County, Tenn., May 3rd, 1827 and came to Texas with his parents in 1837 and was raised near Daingerfield, Morris County. He settled in Upshur County, now Camp, where he lived many years and at the time of his death. Being one of the pioneers of Texas, he endured many of the dangers and hardships of frontier life. He served as Lieutenant in the late war and discharged the duties of his office so that he gained the confidence and esteem of his whole command, many of whom remain to shed the tear of grief for him. He left many relatives and friends, and but few, if any, enemies. He did not profess regeneration of heart until his last sickness, when he found Jesus precious in the pardon of his sins and died trusting in Him for salvation. Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, they cease from their labors and their works do follow them.

BURIAL: Reeves Cemetery, Camp Co., Texas. Row 4, 6th grave. Directions: From Business {271}on the south side of Pittsburg, TX. Take Highway {556}west for 2 miles. Take county road {1519}west for 2 miles. Turn left onto the blacktop road {3326}, (A sign as one turns left has the church name and insignia).

+ 12 xi. Mary Jane LILLEY, born Sep 1833 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died Aft. 1900 in Believe Haskell Co., Texas.

Generation No. 2

2. Margaret2 LILLEY (Noah G.1) was born 1808 in Smith Co., Tennessee, and died 24 Mar 1840 in Hardin Co., Tennessee. She married (1) Noel CHERRY Abt. 1825 in Hardin Co., Tennessee, son of Isham CHERRY and Silvah HARRELL. He was born 13 Mar 1802 in Martin Co., North Carolina, and died Bef. 21 Sep 1835 in Hardin Co., Tennessee. She married (2) Samuel WATSON 23 May 1837 in Hardin Co., Tennessee. He was born 15 Sep 1803 in York Co., South Carolina, and died 14 Oct 1865 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

Notes for Noel CHERRY:

He died bef. 21 September 1835 in Hardin Co., Tennessee, when Eli Cherry and Margaret Cherry entered into a new bond as guardian of the minor heirs. ( Har Tn, Co Ct Min, C/71 ) He had three children. ( Ibid 96 ) Eli Cherry was appointed guardian of Mary Ann Cherry, Harrel Cherry and Isham B. Cherry the minor orphans. ( Ibid 418 )

Notes for Samuel WATSON:

1850 Hardin County, TN Census

11 68 68 Watson Samuel 46 M Farmer 3,000 SC

12 68 68 Watson Margaret 43 F TN

13 68 68 Watson John 20 M Farmer TN

14 68 68 Watson Rebecca 15 F TN

15 68 68 Watson H L 12 M TN

16 68 68 Watson Noah Z 10 M TN

17 68 68 Watson Elizabeth 7 F TN

18 68 68 Watson John 4 M TN

19 68 68 Watson Margaret 2 F TN

20 68 68 Watson Bowen 7/12 M

Note: black individual listed as living in home of Samuel.

21 68 68 Mitchell Alfred 28 M B Laborer TN

From: First 100 years ?

Watson, Samuel

Head of household, 1830 (USC); Head of household, 1840 (USC-228); Named as

steward, 13 August 1853 (MethCt); License to preach renewed, 20 August 1854

(MethCt); License renewed, 5 September 1857 (MethCt); License renwed, 4

September 1858 (MethCt); Listed as #110 in special census, March 1833 (SC);

Listed in 1st Dist. with 300 acres, 7 June 1862 (CWDT)

Tennessee Tidbits, 1778-1914, Volume 1, by Marjorie Fisher

Watson, Samuel - 7 November 1842 was appointed guardian of Martha G. Watson,

John W. Watson, and Matilda R. C. Watson, minor heirs of Samuel Watson and

grandchildren of John White, Sr. (Was he appointed guardian of his own

children.) (Har TN, Co Ct Min, C/515)

Children of Margaret LILLEY and Noel CHERRY are:

+ 13 i. Mary Ann3 CHERRY, born 20 Sep 1826 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

+ 14 ii. Harrell Lilley CHERRY, born 1828 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died 21 Jan 1890 in Bowie, Montague Co., Texas.

+ 15 iii. Isham Barnett CHERRY, born 1830 in Savannah, Hardin Co., Tennessee.

Children of Margaret LILLEY and Samuel WATSON are:

+ 16 i. Hugh Lilley3 WATSON, born Abt. 1838 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

17 ii. Noah Zachariah WATSON, born Abt. 1840 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

Notes for Noah Zachariah WATSON:

CENSUS: 1850 Census of Tennessee, Hardin Co., Age. 10. 1860 Census of Tennessee, Hardin Co., Coffee Landing, dated Sept. 1880. Age 20. Occupation: Farmer I have not been able to find Noah on the 1870 Census.



3. Nancy2 LILLEY (Noah G.1) was born 1810 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee, and died Aft. 1880 in Titus Co., Texas. She married Jessie CHERRY in Hardin Co., Tennessee, son of Isham CHERRY. He was born 27 Apr 1804 in Martin Co., North Carolina, and died Bef. 1850 in Tennessee.

Notes for Nancy LILLEY:

After the death of her husband, Nancy never remarried. She moved from Hardin Co., Tennessee to Titus Co., ( now Morris Co.) Texas.

CENSUS: 1850 US Census for Texas, Titus Co., ( now Morris Co.) Age: 42 1860 Census of Texas, Upsher Co. Gilmer P.O, Western District. dated 21 June 1860, age 50. She was a Farmer. Property valued at 12,800 dollars. Personal Property valued at 2,300 dollars. Her brother Thaddeus was living with her. 1870 Census of Texas, Hopkins Co., Millers Grove, Precinct 4, dated 13 October 1870. Age: 60 Occupation: Keeping House 1880 Census of Texas, Hopkins Co., Precinct 7, dated 19 June 1880. Age 70. She was living with her son Washington.

1850 SLAVE SCHEDULE: Titus Co ., Texas 15 September 1850. Nancy Cherry owned the following slave; 1 male 30.

Children of Nancy LILLEY and Jessie CHERRY are:

+ 18 i. Columbus F.3 CHERRY, born 27 Apr 1827 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died 03 Apr 1897 in Squaw Valley, Fresno Co., California.

+ 19 ii. 2nd Lt. Isham Perry CHERRY, born Abt. 1830 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died Bef. 1910 in Washington Co., Arkansas.

+ 20 iii. Noel Franklin CHERRY, born 01 Jun 1831 in Hardin Co., Tennessee; died 23 Oct 1903 in Hardin Co., Tennessee.

21 iv. Margaret Elizabeth CHERRY, born Abt. 1832 in Tennessee.

Notes for Margaret Elizabeth CHERRY:

CENSUS: 1850 Census of Texas, Titus Co., 10 Sep - 7 Oct 1850. Age: 18

22 v. Jackson CHERRY, born Abt. 1836 in Tennessee.

Notes for Jackson CHERRY:

CENSUS: 1850 Census of Texas, Titus Co., 10 Sep - 7 Oct 1850. Age: 14

23 vi. Adaline CHERRY, born Abt. 1838 in Tennessee.

Notes for Adaline CHERRY:

CENSUS: 1850 Census of Texas, Titus Co., 10 Sep - 7 Oct 1850. Age: 12

24 vii. Hugh CHERRY, born Abt. 1841 in Tennessee.

Notes for Hugh CHERRY:

CENSUS: 1850 Census of Texas, Titus Co., 10 Sep - 7 Oct 1850. Age:9 1860 US Census of Texas, Upsher Co. Western District. dated 21 June 1860, age 17.

+ 25 viii. Jessie Washington CHERRY, born Abt. 1846 in Texas.



4. Sheriff Zachariah ( Zach )2 LILLEY (Noah G.1) was born 06 Jul 1812 in Rutherford Co., Tennessee, and died 14 May 1896 in St. Clair Co., Missouri. He married (1) Margaret Ann WAGONER. She was born 21 Apr 1817, and died 22 Mar 1835 in Hardin Co., Tennessee. He married (2) Agatha Lewis NASH 31 May 1837 in St. Clair Co., Missouri, daughter of Gabriel NASH and Elizabeth McCLANAHAN. She was born 19 Aug 1819 in Roanoke, Virginia, and died 03 Dec 1888 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Sheriff Zachariah ( Zach ) LILLEY:

On 21 Sept. 1835 he was appointed a Constable in Capt. Tankersley's Company, Hardin Co., Tennessee.

1839 Hardin Co. Tn. Direct Deed Book D-360 Noah Lilley gave a Slave to his son Zachariah. .

From 1846 to 1850 he was Sheriff of St. Clair Co., Missouri.

CENSUS: 1840 US Census of Missouri, Henry Co., Wableau Twp. pg 366-1: 1M(0-4), 1M(10-14), 1M(20-29), 1F(20-29), 1SM(10-23), 1SF(10-23), 1(Com). 1850 Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., 15 August 1850, Occupation:Farming.: 1860 Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co. Oseola Twp. 1870 Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 57 Occupation: Farmer. 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 67 Occupation: Farmer

1850 Slave Schedule: St. Clair Co., Mo. 15 August 1850, Zach Lilley owned the following slaves: 1 female 30; 1 male 25; 1 male 20; 1 male 5; 1 female 3; 1 male 1.

1860 Slave Schedule, St. Clair Co., Oseola Twp.,

Osceola Herald, Osceola, MO, 14 September 1871, The School Election.

The election for school officers on Saturday last passed off satisfactorily. The Democracy had brought out a ticket the week before, but the dissatisfaction at their nominees, compelled the withdrawal of Mr. Donovan and the placing of a Republican, Mr. Linney, upon their ticket; with one exception the ticket as then formed was elected. While there were two tickets, there was but a difference of two names upon them, Messrs. Lilley, Nesbit and Sander being upon both tickets. The following gentlemen were elected: Zach. Lilley, F.C. Nesbit, J.H. Linney, W.D. Graham and Ferd. Sander. The Board met and organized with D.P. Shield, President; J.H. Linney, Clerk; F.C. Nesbit, Treasurer. We consider the Board an excellent one.

Osceola Township Officers, elected in 1874: Zach. Lilley, trustee

Osceola Township Officers, elected in 1875: Zachariah Lilley, trustee

Osceola Sun 17 July 1879 Board of Education – Z. Lilley ( Unknown if this is Zachariah or Zachariah L.)

LILLEY, ZACHARIAH

Zachariah Lilley (1812-1896), one of the eight children of Noah Lilley, a native of North Carolina, and Mary Curry Barnett (North Carolina), was born in Rutherford county, Tennessee, July 6, 1812 and died in St. Clair County, Missouri, May 14, 1896. When Zachariah left Tennessee in 1836, his family was living in Hardin County in that state. Most of his brothers and sisters moved to Texas, which as a new state, was offering opportunities to settlers. Some of Zachariah's relatives had preceded him to Missouri, so he was not a complete stranger when he arrived at the settlement on the Osage River in Rives County, and took a position as clerk in the Cox Brothers Store. On May 30, 1837, he was married to Agatha Lewis Nash (born August 19, 1819 in Roanoke Co., Virginia; died December 4, 1888 in St. Clair County, Missouri). She was the daughter of Dr. Gabriel Penn Nash and Elizabeth Madison McClanahan, who had now become Mrs. P.M. Cox, Sr. In 1840, Zachariah Lilley signed the petition to make St. Clair County from a portion of Rives County. Zachariah and his wife Agatha lived in a small house in Osceola, then purchased several hundred acres across the Osage about a mile from Osceola, and with the help of slave labor, operated the farm. Known as the Beers place today, it was then called Cedar Cliff. The old house was on the bluff, the corn fields were in the rich bottom land and the famous watermelon patch was on Lilley's Island. Mrs. and Mrs. Lilley and their eleven children are buried in Osceola Cemetery. -- St. Clair County Democrat, 14 March 1940

A petition for the organization of St. Clair county to become an independent municipality in 1840 was signed by: John Barnett, S.C. Bruce, R.P. Cocke, Dr. P.M. Cox, Thomas Cruthaid, J.A. Culbertson, G.B. Culbertson, J.C. Greenwell, Columbus Halin (Hahn?), H.N. Hester, John Howard, James Hoover, William B. Lawler, Z. Lilley, James Renfro, J. Ridgeway, W.H. Scobey, Albert Sheldon, George Short, Hiram Short, H.Y. Small, R.H. Sproul, Ervin Thomas, John R. White.

At that time, there were 350 heads of families.

The Burning Of Osceola: By The Jayhawker Jim Lane

Osceola, the pride of all Southwest Missouri and portions of Arkansas, was razed to the ground, not a house being left to mark the spot where a few hours previously had teemed and toiled nearly 2,000 souls.

From a correspondent of the Osceola Sun we extract the following, giving a vivid description of the destruction of this important town and trading post:

The "Border War" was known all over the United States long before the first cannon boomed at Sumpter, and grew out of the questions that had long been agitated, whether Kansas should be a free or slave state, and it culminated in the election, the freesoilers carrying the day by a small majority. Jim Lane and others of less notoriety began a warfare all along the frontier counties in Missouri, bordering on Kansas. This grew more bitter when Missouri began retaliation, crossing the border into Kansas and committing many depradations in revenge for deeds that had been committed in their state.

It was these bands that afterwards became noted as the Missouri and Kansas guerillas. Jim Lane, long before 1861, had threatened to make a raid on Osceola, for the purpose of robbing the bank at this point. Osceola, at that time was the great metropolis of southwest Missouri, and in fact, it was the greatest commercial city west of Jefferson City or southwest of Boonville. The people of St. Clair County had nothing to do with casting illegal votes in the Kansas election, nor had they taken any part in the border war. About the first of December, 1860, Jim Lane collected together about one hundred and fifty of his followers and started for Osceola. After moving his band as far east as Papinville, he retraced his steps back across the border line, and his band disbanded, subject to the call of their leader. The cause of his sudden change of mind was that the citizens of St. Clair County had been informed of the object of his visit, and had collected in force for the defense of their beautiful county seat. Fully five hundred well armed men were ready to meet him and they remained on guard till all danger was over. Lane kept up his agitation of a raid on Osceola, and pictured to his followers in glowing colors the vast amount of wealth that would be secured from the town and bank, but they well knew that the old pioneers would never give their consent, and that the streams would be dyed with blood as long as the old Virginians and Kentuckians, by whom the county was populated, had strength enough to level the ever ready and never failing rifle. Soon after this futile attempt of Lane's the thunder of battle sounded along Columbia's southern shore.

Fort Sumpter fell, star after star shot from the cluster of states, and southern blood and valor were at fever heat and rallying to arms. 1861 was here, and war was inaugurated. The blaze of battle began to scorch the fair fields of the sunny south, and the great commonwealth of Missouri was suffering terribly from invading armies on three sides of her, she being almost a desolate daughter of the Southern Confederacy. Illinois joined with Kansas and sent untold numbers of plunderers into the richest districts of Missouri. Banks were robbed, the wealthiest citizens plundered, stock driven off, and wagons and teams stolen and loaded with the goods taken from the people, and wearing apparel and jewelry of every description was taken from the ladies. There never was a richer field for plunder than Missouri in 1861. The people flew to arms. Old men and boys alike, regardless of age, formed themselves into home guards for protection against the numerous bands of outlaws that overran the state. Guerilla bands were organized all along the bloody border, and a jayhawker and guerilla war began in earnest. Old men and boys were murdered by the jayhawker bands for opinions' sake, and "blood for blood" became the rallying cry; and, to give a more bitter aspect to the feeling, black flags were unfurled by both parties, and the glare of the burning houses served to show where the human monsters had left their prey.

As men were now hurrying off to join the regular army the Missouri border was left pretty much unprotected, and the Jayhawkers widened their field of operations. In September 1861, while General Price's army was at Lexington, and no Confederate soldiers in St. Clair County, except a few stragglers and recruiting officers, Lane considered his chance for carrying out his long neglected threat of burning and sacking Osceola. It stands on the right or south bank of the Osage River, and is one of the healthiest towns in the West, being situated upon a beautiful elevation of 200 feet above the river bed and surrounded by beautiful, rolling ridges, at the foot of which gush forth springs of sparkling water of the finest quality and taste. St. Clair County was settled up by a thrifty and enterprising people, who turned their attention largely to stock raising, and a majority of them had grown wealthy before hostilities began. Men of wealth and enterprise bought property in Osceola and went into business. The town is considered at the head of navigation, although the boats have ascended as far up the beautiful stream as Taberville, at or near the western boundary of the county. Boats ascended the river as far as Osceola regularly before the breaking out of the war, and the town became the great shipping point for eleven counties in the Southwest, and goods were also hauled from this point to Benton County, Arkansas.

The town had grown to large proportions, and was a mine of wealth to the citizens of the county. To show the flourishing condition of our county in 1860, it is only necessary to say we had a common school fund of $98,000. There were twelve or fifteen business houses in town, and several did wholesale as well as retail business. Prominent among the business men we may mention Johnson & Vaughn, John F. Weidemeyer & Son, dry goods: John Yeater, dry goods and groceries; Sterns & Baker, saddlery, and Sterns also had a shoe shop; Dorchester, hardware; Clark Vaughn, hardware; Dr. Dorrell, drugs; Henry Pollard and Richard Fuell, hotels and livery. Besides these we had one furniture store, several saloons and blacksmith shops, several church houses, a carding factory, tan yard and several other businesses, including a bank and newspaper office. The newspaper was owned by Richard (Dick) Devin, who died not long since. The bank was controlled and principally owned by Messrs. Johnson, Vaughn and Weidmeyer. The court house was a fine brick structure which had been built at a cost of $15,000 to the county. Johnson & Vaughn and John F. Weidmeyer & son did wholesale business, and at times as many as a hundred wagons from the southwest counties were on the streets or backyards waiting for loading at these two business houses. The place had long been the "apple in the eye" of Jim Lane as the richest strike in the southwest, and on the 22nd day of September, 1861, he collected together about two hundred of his band and from a point near Fort Scott made a bee line for the town.

The bank deposits, amounting to about $150,000, had been removed to other cities for better security, as the directors knew the exposed condition of the place, and Lane's desire to raid the town. The line of march of the Jayhawkers led down the south side of the Osage River from Fort Scott to Osceola, a distance of about sixty miles. They crossed Sac River at the Waldo Ford. Sac River is a small stream that empties into the Osage two miles above Osceola. On the 23rd day of September, 1861, about eight o'clock p.m., Lane and his band entered the town with torches in hand and two pieces of artillery. No Confederate soldiers were occupying the town at the time of their entrance, but Captain John M. Weidemeyer and forty men chanced to be in the vicinity, and as Lane entered the town they fired upon him from the brush, and then slowly retreated in the direction of Warsaw. Weidemeyer has since often been heard to say that if he could have pictured the scene which a short twenty-four hours was to bring forth, he and his men would have died in their tracks before deserting the doomed city. The pillage soon began. Instead of pursuing Weidemeyer the Jayhawkers burst open the doors of the bank and removed the safe that had contained the money, and blew it open, but only a few private papers of no value to anyone except the owners rewarded them for their trouble. Finding himself balked, Lane flew into a towering rage, and swore the whole town should suffer the consequences, and be burned and pillaged. The clan were ordered to search the town for anything of value. No citizens from the country were allowed to pass the pickets under any circumstances while the pillage was going on.

The morning of the 24th, Dr. John Trollinger and three others wished to cross the river into town, not knowing that it was infested by Lane and his band. They arrived on the opposite side of the river and hallooed for a skiff to bring them over. This was done, but no sooner were they safely landed than they were fired upon by fifty or sixty outlaws. The doctor received eleven buckshot wounds, though not of a serious character, and one of his friends, named Summers, was shot in the mouth with a minnie ball, which carried away a part of his jawbone and injured him for life. The other two managed to escape, leaving their horses in the hands of the enemy.

As Zachariah Lilley, one of the old pioneers of the county, and a man greatly beloved by all who know him, was fording the river on horseback, aiming to come to town, he was fired on by the guard, and the gentleman had to wheel his horse and dash into the timber to save his life, the bullets whistling around him in a very unpleasant manner, but fortunately he escaped unscathed.

In this manner they fired on everyone who dared to approach the town. By night the pillage was over, and a large wagon train had been loaded with the spoils. Negroes swarmed to Lane like flies around a carcass, and were permitted to load themselves down with goods of every description. What was considered of little value or too bulky for easy removal was thrown into the streets. Hundreds of barrels of whiskey had their heads knocked out, and the contents formed little rivulets and ran into the river. The court house was broken open and the county records destroyed. And now Lane ordered his men to scatter and apply the torch to every house in town. The band went to work, and soon the business portion of the town was a seething mass of flames.

The fire leaped from house to house. The flames and smoke seemed to have reached their element, but still the storm raged on. The county buildings were soon enveloped by the devouring fiend, but still the flames went up. It was not long before the entire city of magnificence and wealth - the pride of the entire people of Southwest Missouri, was a smoking mass of ruins. Even the women and children were not allowed to move anything from their burning houses, and much suffering was the result. Soon the work of destruction was finished. Lane and his men started with their plunder for Kansas, leaving old age and helpless innocence to keep vigil over the dead and wounded, and water with tears the spot which only a few short hours before had been peaceful, contented, happy homes. In Lane's official report to the government he said he had taken $1,000,000 worth of goods away with him, and it could not have fallen short of that amount, and it is safe to say he destroyed a great deal more than he carried away.

But the city of Osceola was fearfully avenged when Lawrence, Kansas, was razed to the ground, and the inhabitants scattered to the four winds of heaven.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Margaret Ann WAGONER:

BURIED: Ross 111 Cemetery, Hardin Co., Tennessee.

Notes for Agatha Lewis NASH:

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 50 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 60

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri. 69yr 3mo 7days

Children of Zachariah LILLEY and Agatha NASH are:

26 i. Gabriel N.3 LILLEY, born Abt. 1838 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 23 Aug 1879 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Gabriel N. LILLEY:

St. Clair Deputy Treasurer.

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 30 Occupation: Farmer.

Osceola Sun, Osceola, MO, 28 August 1879

The funeral last Sabbath was largely attended and many tears fell while the solemn and impressive ceremonies were in progress. Few men leave behind them as few enemies and many friends as did Gabriel N. Lilley.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri

27 ii. Mary E. LILLEY, born 14 Oct 1840 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 27 Aug 1842 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Mary E. LILLEY:

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

28 iii. Sarah M. LILLEY, born 26 Nov 1843 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 26 Nov 1843 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Sarah M. LILLEY:

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

+ 29 iv. Ellen Gertrude LILLEY, born 11 Nov 1844 in Osceola, St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 06 Jan 1926 in Appleton City, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

30 v. Infant Daughter LILLEY, born 30 Jan 1847 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 30 Jan 1847 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Infant Daughter LILLEY:

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

31 vi. William P. LILLEY, born Abt. 1848 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 12 Jan 1901.

Notes for William P. LILLEY:

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 21 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 32 1900 Haskell Co., Texas Precinct 1, dated 7 June 1900, age 51. Living with his fathers sister's Mary J. Sayles, Martha A. Fields and her son William W. Fields.

Osceola Sun, Osceola, MO. 5 December 1878

On Thursday last the young men of Osceola and environs, in accordance to agreement, made a sortie into the surrounding country with direful interest.

Many of them started the night before so that they might be at what they believed, the best hunting neighborhood, at an early hour.

All the game was in at seven o’clock, p.m., per agreement, and Dr. Pingry, an old and well trained son of Diana, was solicited and prevailed upon to take the Judge’s chair, and made the following amount of points: W. Daniels (Capt.): A.M. Simms, 125; Jno. Philips, 140; Sam’l Lewis, 65; F. Hostetter, 105; J.R. Baldwin, 120; Dan’l Morgan, 70; Jas. Henley, 50; A. Benner, 105; Dock Lilley, 55; Joel Dean, 110; Wm. Holsapple, 210. Total: 1125. Ed. Lewis (Capt.): Will Lilley, 115; Walter Lilley, 175; Fred R. James, 25; Hiram Meeker, 45; Fred Daniels, 155; J.J. Chaney, 115; Ed. Simms, 75; Wm. Henley & Wm. Gallaway, 70; David Chinn, 70; James Derringer, 90. Total: 915.

The day was not one of the best for hunting and, considering the amount of practice the members of the two clubs have had the amount of game obtained speaks well for St. Clair County sportsmen. As will be seen by reference to the above figures, Mr. W.A. Daniels’ side came off victors by a majority of 190 points. W.C. Holsapple by his 210 points brought victory to his side. Mr. Walter Lilley tallied the second greatest number of points, ie., 175. Mr. Fred Daniels with 155 points was third. Fortunately we are unable to record any accidents.

Osceola Sun, Osceola, MO, 17 Jul 1879

The first watermelons of the season appeared in the Osceola market last Saturday and were readily sold at good prices. The melons were raised by Wm. Lilley.

Osceola Sun, Osceola, MO, 28 August 1879

Will Lilley is the boss watermelon vendor in Osceola.

Voice of The People, Osceola, Missouri, 25 February 1880

Mr. William Lilley is seriously sick with pneumonia.

Osceola Sun, 11 March 1880

Will. Lilley is convalescent. He is able to sit up, but afflicted with rheumatism somewhat.

An Archery Club was organized which attained considerable skill. In a trial of skill between opposing sides the following were the winners:

Capt. J.H. Linney, Miss Sallie Harris, Mrs. E.L. Landes, Miss Lizzie Lilley, Mrs. J.H. Linney, Mrs. J.H. Lucas, Will Lilley, L. Conant, Miss Ella Amrine.

Tombstone Inscription: 53 yr 2 mo. 14 days.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

32 vii. Walter E. LILLEY, born 04 Mar 1851 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 24 Jan 1898 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Walter E. LILLEY:

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 19 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 29 Occupation: Merchant of goods

Osceola Sun, Osceola, MO. 5 December 1878

On Thursday last the young men of Osceola and environs, in accordance to agreement, made a sortie into the surrounding country with direful interest.

Many of them started the night before so that they might be at what they believed, the best hunting neighborhood, at an early hour.

All the game was in at seven o’clock, p.m., per agreement, and Dr. Pingry, an old and well trained son of Diana, was solicited and prevailed upon to take the Judge’s chair, and made the following amount of points: W. Daniels (Capt.): A.M. Simms, 125; Jno. Philips, 140; Sam’l Lewis, 65; F. Hostetter, 105; J.R. Baldwin, 120; Dan’l Morgan, 70; Jas. Henley, 50; A. Benner, 105; Dock Lilley, 55; Joel Dean, 110; Wm. Holsapple, 210. Total: 1125. Ed. Lewis (Capt.): Will Lilley, 115; Walter Lilley, 175; Fred R. James, 25; Hiram Meeker, 45; Fred Daniels, 155; J.J. Chaney, 115; Ed. Simms, 75; Wm. Henley & Wm. Gallaway, 70; David Chinn, 70; James Derringer, 90. Total: 915.

The day was not one of the best for hunting and, considering the amount of practice the members of the two clubs have had the amount of game obtained speaks well for St. Clair County sportsmen. As will be seen by reference to the above figures, Mr. W.A. Daniels’ side came off victors by a majority of 190 points. W.C. Holsapple by his 210 points brought victory to his side. Mr. Walter Lilley tallied the second greatest number of points, ie., 175. Mr. Fred Daniels with 155 points was third. Fortunately we are unable to record any accidents.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

33 viii. Sheriff Zachariah L. ( Zach ) LILLEY, born 19 Jul 1855 in Osceola, St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 27 Jan 1890 in Osceola, St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Sheriff Zachariah L. ( Zach ) LILLEY:

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 13 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 23 Occupation: Merchant of goods

From 1884 to1888 he was Sheriff of St. Clair Co., Missouri

Death Certificate lists him as an ex Sheriff. Undertaker was Thomas Amrine. Osceola, Missouri. He was Single, Place of death was Osceola, Missouri. He was an American, born in Osceola and had lived in Missouri all of his life. He was male white age 34 years and 8 days old. St. Clair County, Roll No. 9978 , Page 30. No. 35.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri. 28 Jan 1890.

34 ix. Elizabeth M. ( Lizzie ) LILLEY, born 1859 in St. Clair Co., Missouri; died 1893 in St. Clair Co., Missouri.

Notes for Elizabeth M. ( Lizzie ) LILLEY:

CENSUS: 1870 US Census of Missouri, St. Clair Co., Oceola Twp., 3 January 1870. Age 11 1880 Census of Missouri, St, Clair Co., Oceola Twp. dated 3 June 1880. Age: 19

An Archery Club was organized which attained considerable skill. In a trial of skill between opposing sides the following were the winners:

Capt. J.H. Linney, Miss Sallie Harris, Mrs. E.L. Landes, Miss Lizzie Lilley, Mrs. J.H. Linney, Mrs. J.H. Lucas, Will Lilley, L. Conant, Miss Ella Amrine.

BURIAL: Osceola Cemetery, St. Clair Co., Missouri.


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