" He it!". Made me do. " How are you today?" " "



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" He .... it!". Made me do.

" How are you today?" - " .... ." Fine.

" I .... phone you!". Did.

".... you are here, I'm off! See you!". Since.

"I've never been to Prague." "Neither _____________ Have I."

"Of course! It goes without ...." Saying.

'(1) __________ the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run (2) __________ enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is (3) ______________ of us that owns more than his bare skin. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given during this last year? And what has happened to that milk which (4) _________________ breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you (5) ________ in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. ('Animal Farm' by George Orwell, 1945). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (3)? Not one.

'(1) __________ the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run (2) __________ enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is (3) ______________ of us that owns more than his bare skin. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given during this last year? And what has happened to that milk which (4) _________________ breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you (5) ________ in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. ('Animal Farm' by George Orwell, 1945). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (4)? Should have been.

'(1) __________ the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run (2) __________ enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is (3) ______________ of us that owns more than his bare skin. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given during this last year? And what has happened to that milk which (4) _________________ breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you (5) ________ in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. ('Animal Farm' by George Orwell, 1945). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (2)? Fast.

'(1) __________ the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run (2) __________ enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is (3) ______________ of us that owns more than his bare skin. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given during this last year? And what has happened to that milk which (4) _________________ breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you (5) ________ in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. ('Animal Farm' by George Orwell, 1945). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (1)? Man is.

'(1) __________ the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run (2) __________ enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Our labour tills the soil, our dung fertilises it, and yet there is (3) ______________ of us that owns more than his bare skin. You cows that I see before me, how many thousands of gallons of milk have you given during this last year? And what has happened to that milk which (4) _________________ breeding up sturdy calves? Every drop of it has gone down the throats of our enemies. And you hens, how many eggs have you (5) ________ in this last year, and how many of those eggs ever hatched into chickens? The rest have all gone to market to bring in money for Jones and his men. ('Animal Farm' by George Orwell, 1945). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (5)? Laid.

.... , if he doesn't call you by tomorrow afternoon. I'll let you know.

.... against the yen in the past month? Has the dollar fallen.

.... do? Pleased to meet you. How do you.

.... he's a good student! On the whole.

.... is bad for you. Smoking.

.... is this? It's the Browns'. Whose.

.... other market possibilities, he mentioned a promising deal. While we were discussing.

.... signing here, please? Would you mind.

.... signing the contract he made a phone call. Before.

.... to Mr. Kovac, haven't you? You've already spoken.

.... you nor Tom will have to work this weekend! Neither.

__________ you be so kind as __________ the window? Would / to open.

____________ her illness, Linda continued to play tennis. Despite.

_____________ the play is set in Italy, ________ the characters are Italian. Although / few of.

_______________ information ____________ our company is now possible on line. Obtaining / about.

_______________ is very much a part of Barbara's character. Helpfulness.

________________ my family knew about my boyfriend. None of.

A _____________ the wedding guests ___________ sitting and playing cards. Few of / were.

A flashlight is a battery-powered light .... you can carry around with you. That.

A new wall is .... built. Being.

After the subway bombing last summer, the downturn predicted by so many London watchdogs never happened - if anything, it was just the opposite. Stoic Londoners have carried on with the characteristic stiff upper lip. And with that has come a rapid-fire succession of restaurants from some of the city's (and the world's) most closely watched chefs. Dining out is now one of the capital's favourite pastimes, bringing about the inevitable comparisons to New York. Future openings from heavy hitters like Joël Robuchon, who will make his mark on both London and Manhattan this year, draw the parallel even closer. But London is not just a stage for international players. Everyone passes through Borough Market at some point. It's become a Grand Central Station for food lovers, who stop to marvel at the furred and feathered game, to covet Brindisa's Spanish hams, or to graze at the dozens of stalls serving seared scallops, oysters, chorizo buns. "Furred and feathered game" refers to..... Wild animals.

After the subway bombing last summer, the downturn predicted by so many London watchdogs never happened - if anything, it was just the opposite. Stoic Londoners have carried on with the characteristic stiff upper lip. And with that has come a rapid-fire succession of restaurants from some of the city's (and the world's) most closely watched chefs. Dining out is now one of the capital's favourite pastimes, bringing about the inevitable comparisons to New York. Future openings from heavy hitters like Joël Robuchon, who will make his mark on both London and Manhattan this year, draw the parallel even closer. But London is not just a stage for international players. Everyone passes through Borough Market at some point. It's become a Grand Central Station for food lovers, who stop to marvel at the furred and feathered game, to covet Brindisa's Spanish hams, or to graze at the dozens of stalls serving seared scallops, oysters, chorizo buns. Londoners are described as ....... People not easily phased.

After the subway bombing last summer, the downturn predicted by so many London watchdogs never happened - if anything, it was just the opposite. Stoic Londoners have carried on with the characteristic stiff upper lip. And with that has come a rapid-fire succession of restaurants from some of the city's (and the world's) most closely watched chefs. Dining out is now one of the capital's favourite pastimes, bringing about the inevitable comparisons to New York. Future openings from heavy hitters like Joël Robuchon, who will make his mark on both London and Manhattan this year, draw the parallel even closer. But London is not just a stage for international players. Everyone passes through Borough Market at some point. It's become a Grand Central Station for food lovers, who stop to marvel at the furred and feathered game, to covet Brindisa's Spanish hams, or to graze at the dozens of stalls serving seared scallops, oysters, chorizo buns. Here, "heavy-hitter" means..... Well-known.

After the subway bombing last summer, the downturn predicted by so many London watchdogs never happened - if anything, it was just the opposite. Stoic Londoners have carried on with the characteristic stiff upper lip. And with that has come a rapid-fire succession of restaurants from some of the city's (and the world's) most closely watched chefs. Dining out is now one of the capital's favourite pastimes, bringing about the inevitable comparisons to New York. Future openings from heavy hitters like Joël Robuchon, who will make his mark on both London and Manhattan this year, draw the parallel even closer. But London is not just a stage for international players. Everyone passes through Borough Market at some point. It's become a Grand Central Station for food lovers, who stop to marvel at the furred and feathered game, to covet Brindisa's Spanish hams, or to graze at the dozens of stalls serving seared scallops, oysters, chorizo buns. "Downturn" means... Decline.

After the subway bombing last summer, the downturn predicted by so many London watchdogs never happened - if anything, it was just the opposite. Stoic Londoners have carried on with the characteristic stiff upper lip. And with that has come a rapid-fire succession of restaurants from some of the city's (and the world's) most closely watched chefs. Dining out is now one of the capital's favourite pastimes, bringing about the inevitable comparisons to New York. Future openings from heavy hitters like Joël Robuchon, who will make his mark on both London and Manhattan this year, draw the parallel even closer. But London is not just a stage for international players. Everyone passes through Borough Market at some point. It's become a Grand Central Station for food lovers, who stop to marvel at the furred and feathered game, to covet Brindisa's Spanish hams, or to graze at the dozens of stalls serving seared scallops, oysters, chorizo buns. "A rapid-fire succession of restaurants" are ..... A series of restaurants opening quickly.

Alfred is now hanging around only well-to-do people! Alfred frequenta solamente gente altolocata!

Alice is sincere through and through. Alice è completamente sincera.

All boarding passes .... to the flight attendant before boarding. Must be given.

All the hydrochloric acid .... in this tank. Is stored.

As always happens, an industry grows up around any such laws (and lawsuits), dedicated to policing, sustaining and extending the legal framework. The industry consists of government bodies, (1) ______________ Britain's Commission for Racial Equality, which investigate complaints; official agencies, such as France's Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel, which monitor the media for racist remarks; and (2) ____________ number of informal organisations that represent minorities and win their spurs by doing battle with the political establishment. Laws against incitement to hatred tend to hamper (3) ____________ of debate because they are too easily interpreted as laws against causing offence. The placing of sanctions on "offensive" speech risks conflating two different things: bigoted speech (4) __________ constructive criticism. The big danger is that, in the (5) ______________ of stopping bigots, one may end up stopping all criticism. (The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group, 2006). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (4)? And.

As always happens, an industry grows up around any such laws (and lawsuits), dedicated to policing, sustaining and extending the legal framework. The industry consists of government bodies, (1) ______________ Britain's Commission for Racial Equality, which investigate complaints; official agencies, such as France's Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel, which monitor the media for racist remarks; and (2) ____________ number of informal organisations that represent minorities and win their spurs by doing battle with the political establishment. Laws against incitement to hatred tend to hamper (3) ____________ of debate because they are too easily interpreted as laws against causing offence. The placing of sanctions on "offensive" speech risks conflating two different things: bigoted speech (4) __________ constructive criticism. The big danger is that, in the (5) ______________ of stopping bigots, one may end up stopping all criticism. (The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group, 2006). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (5)? Name.

As always happens, an industry grows up around any such laws (and lawsuits), dedicated to policing, sustaining and extending the legal framework. The industry consists of government bodies, (1) ______________ Britain's Commission for Racial Equality, which investigate complaints; official agencies, such as France's Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel, which monitor the media for racist remarks; and (2) ____________ number of informal organisations that represent minorities and win their spurs by doing battle with the political establishment. Laws against incitement to hatred tend to hamper (3) ____________ of debate because they are too easily interpreted as laws against causing offence. The placing of sanctions on "offensive" speech risks conflating two different things: bigoted speech (4) __________ constructive criticism. The big danger is that, in the (5) ______________ of stopping bigots, one may end up stopping all criticism. (The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group, 2006). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (2)? Any.

As always happens, an industry grows up around any such laws (and lawsuits), dedicated to policing, sustaining and extending the legal framework. The industry consists of government bodies, (1) ______________ Britain's Commission for Racial Equality, which investigate complaints; official agencies, such as France's Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel, which monitor the media for racist remarks; and (2) ____________ number of informal organisations that represent minorities and win their spurs by doing battle with the political establishment. Laws against incitement to hatred tend to hamper (3) ____________ of debate because they are too easily interpreted as laws against causing offence. The placing of sanctions on "offensive" speech risks conflating two different things: bigoted speech (4) __________ constructive criticism. The big danger is that, in the (5) ______________ of stopping bigots, one may end up stopping all criticism. (The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group, 2006). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (3)? Openness.

As always happens, an industry grows up around any such laws (and lawsuits), dedicated to policing, sustaining and extending the legal framework. The industry consists of government bodies, (1) ______________ Britain's Commission for Racial Equality, which investigate complaints; official agencies, such as France's Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel, which monitor the media for racist remarks; and (2) ____________ number of informal organisations that represent minorities and win their spurs by doing battle with the political establishment. Laws against incitement to hatred tend to hamper (3) ____________ of debate because they are too easily interpreted as laws against causing offence. The placing of sanctions on "offensive" speech risks conflating two different things: bigoted speech (4) __________ constructive criticism. The big danger is that, in the (5) ______________ of stopping bigots, one may end up stopping all criticism. (The Economist Newspaper and The Economist Group, 2006). Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (1)? Such as.

As it was getting late, we .... to go. Decided.

As soon as he was arrested, the man gave some .... to the police. Information.

At 5:00 am he was making .... the airport. For.

At first, my friend didn't want to hire Wendy. But, because I had previously worked with Wendy, I told my friend that she _____________ take another look at her C.V. and reconsider _______ for the job. Ought to / her.

Before .... switch off the lights. Leaving.

Before .... the letter we ought to contact the client. Writing.

Bromley Limited (1) ________________ in 1908. The founder of the company, Alec Bromley was a steeplejack. In the early years, Alec ran the business with his son, George. The pair owned a horse and cart, some essential tools and equipment and operated from a rented yard in Liverpool, England. Today there are very few steeplejacks left, as the trade has declined over the years. In the past, (2) _____________ , they were very much in demand. Steeplejacks were tradesmen (3) _______________ worked on tall structures, such as church steeples. As buildings became higher during the industrial revolution, steeplejacks were often employed to climb tall chimneys and work (4) ________________ tall buildings in order to carry out maintenance work. Instead of repairing buildings, many steeplejacks were also hired to knock them down. Demolishing chimneys and industrial structures was often part of the trade. At the time, (5) ____________ the management of George Bromley, the firm was expanding into a regional company. Flyers were delivered by hand to mill owners and architects throughout the north-west of England. Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (3)? Who.

Bromley Limited (1) ________________ in 1908. The founder of the company, Alec Bromley was a steeplejack. In the early years, Alec ran the business with his son, George. The pair owned a horse and cart, some essential tools and equipment and operated from a rented yard in Liverpool, England. Today there are very few steeplejacks left, as the trade has declined over the years. In the past, (2) _____________ , they were very much in demand. Steeplejacks were tradesmen (3) _______________ worked on tall structures, such as church steeples. As buildings became higher during the industrial revolution, steeplejacks were often employed to climb tall chimneys and work (4) ________________ tall buildings in order to carry out maintenance work. Instead of repairing buildings, many steeplejacks were also hired to knock them down. Demolishing chimneys and industrial structures was often part of the trade. At the time, (5) ____________ the management of George Bromley, the firm was expanding into a regional company. Flyers were delivered by hand to mill owners and architects throughout the north-west of England. Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (1)? Was established.

Bromley Limited (1) ________________ in 1908. The founder of the company, Alec Bromley was a steeplejack. In the early years, Alec ran the business with his son, George. The pair owned a horse and cart, some essential tools and equipment and operated from a rented yard in Liverpool, England. Today there are very few steeplejacks left, as the trade has declined over the years. In the past, (2) _____________ , they were very much in demand. Steeplejacks were tradesmen (3) _______________ worked on tall structures, such as church steeples. As buildings became higher during the industrial revolution, steeplejacks were often employed to climb tall chimneys and work (4) ________________ tall buildings in order to carry out maintenance work. Instead of repairing buildings, many steeplejacks were also hired to knock them down. Demolishing chimneys and industrial structures was often part of the trade. At the time, (5) ____________ the management of George Bromley, the firm was expanding into a regional company. Flyers were delivered by hand to mill owners and architects throughout the north-west of England. Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (2)? However.

Bromley Limited (1) ________________ in 1908. The founder of the company, Alec Bromley was a steeplejack. In the early years, Alec ran the business with his son, George. The pair owned a horse and cart, some essential tools and equipment and operated from a rented yard in Liverpool, England. Today there are very few steeplejacks left, as the trade has declined over the years. In the past, (2) _____________ , they were very much in demand. Steeplejacks were tradesmen (3) _______________ worked on tall structures, such as church steeples. As buildings became higher during the industrial revolution, steeplejacks were often employed to climb tall chimneys and work (4) ________________ tall buildings in order to carry out maintenance work. Instead of repairing buildings, many steeplejacks were also hired to knock them down. Demolishing chimneys and industrial structures was often part of the trade. At the time, (5) ____________ the management of George Bromley, the firm was expanding into a regional company. Flyers were delivered by hand to mill owners and architects throughout the north-west of England. Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (5)? Under.

Bromley Limited (1) ________________ in 1908. The founder of the company, Alec Bromley was a steeplejack. In the early years, Alec ran the business with his son, George. The pair owned a horse and cart, some essential tools and equipment and operated from a rented yard in Liverpool, England. Today there are very few steeplejacks left, as the trade has declined over the years. In the past, (2) _____________ , they were very much in demand. Steeplejacks were tradesmen (3) _______________ worked on tall structures, such as church steeples. As buildings became higher during the industrial revolution, steeplejacks were often employed to climb tall chimneys and work (4) ________________ tall buildings in order to carry out maintenance work. Instead of repairing buildings, many steeplejacks were also hired to knock them down. Demolishing chimneys and industrial structures was often part of the trade. At the time, (5) ____________ the management of George Bromley, the firm was expanding into a regional company. Flyers were delivered by hand to mill owners and architects throughout the north-west of England. Which of the given alternatives correctly fills in the gap (4)? On top of.
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